6 observations from Sixers-Nets

6 observations from Sixers-Nets

December 16, 2013, 10:15 pm

BOX SCORE

NEW YORK -- Another game, another three-point barrage against the Sixers. Here are six observations from the Nets’ 130-94 victory over the Sixers on Monday night at the Barclays Center (see Instant Replay).

1. Back when Kevin Garnett played for the Celtics, his pregame psych-up theatrics caused a bit of a commotion. In games at the Garden, the Boston fans got fired up and cheered along with Garnett as he beat on the basket support, made a mess with the talcum powder at the scorer’s table before hopping and skipping onto the floor with fist bumps all around.

But in Brooklyn, the crowd is a little more laid-back and cool. Garnett’s theatrics aren’t broadcast on the scoreboard at the Barclays Center. In fact, Garnett got tangled up in the cord of a courtside camera when going through his regimen.

Whatever it is about Garnett’s routine, it works. In his 19th year in the NBA, Garnett knows what it takes to get himself ready and on Monday night, it worked. Garnett drilled a 19-footer on the first shot of the game. He also contributed four rebounds and three assists and was a plus-26 in 12 minutes during the first half.

2. Evan Turner hobbled off the floor and into the locker room just 90 seconds into the game with what turned out to be a contusion to the nail bed of his left big toe. Given the pounding the players’ feet take during a game, let alone an 82-game season, it’s a wonder Turner had a toe nail to protect the nail bed in the first place.

Turner didn’t stay off the floor long. Presumably, he had the toe bandaged and that was good enough.

3. Paul McCartney attended the game in Brooklyn. Any time a Beatle is in the building, it automatically becomes one of the top-two coolest places in the world.

4. Clearly the biggest issue during the Nets’ slow start to the season was the absence of point guard Deron Williams. Playing in his fourth game in a row, Williams had a knack for being in the middle of everything. Early in the first, Williams picked up an assist, stole the inbounds pass and stepped back to drill a three-pointer. On that one, Brett Brown called a quick timeout and lit into his team.

Meanwhile, Williams dished out a season-high 13 assists. Those passes led to 34 points. Conversely, the Sixers’ got five layups from their top assist man, Turner.

5. Before the game, Nets coach Jason Kidd warned his team that the Sixers would not relent from their up-tempo pace. Because the Sixers are the youngest team in the league with an average age of 23.5 and the Nets are the third-oldest with an average age of 30, the pace could have led to some uncomfortable moments.

“No matter what the score is, these guys keep coming,” Kidd said. “They play 48 minutes. [The Sixers] come at you on makes and misses, so transition defense is going to be big.”

6. When Celtics great Larry Bird scored 60 points against the Atlanta Hawks in 1985, his outside shooting was so unbelievable that players on the Hawks’ bench were high-fiving each other. There was no high-fiving on the Sixers’ bench during the third quarter on Monday night, but no worries. Joe Johnson didn’t need it for everyone to know he was shooting the lights out.

Johnson scored 29 points in the third quarter against the Sixers, which is the fifth-most points scored in one quarter in NBA history (see video). It also is the most points scored in one quarter against the Sixers. Had Johnson’s right heel not been on the three-point line on one shot late in the quarter, he would have had an even 30 points in the quarter.

Johnson made eight three-pointers in the quarter and shot 10 for 13. He also had an assist, which is pretty incredible in itself.

Who scores 29 points in a quarter and gets an assist?

Johnson did not play in the fourth quarter, but finished the game with 37 points on 13 for 20 shooting, including 10 for 14 from three-point range.

Meanwhile, the Nets made 21 three-pointers. In the last two games, the opposition is 42 for 72 from three in the last two games.