So Glad Jrue Made the All-Star Game Instead of Those Other Dudes on Good Teams

So Glad Jrue Made the All-Star Game Instead of Those Other Dudes on Good Teams

When Golden State's David Lee was interviewed after a recent Warriors
win about the possibility of being honored with an All-Star nod, he said
that what would make the nomination so special was that it would come
because his team had played well, reflecting better on him by
comparison. Needless to say, this was not the case with our own Jrue
Holiday, but if I were him, I would find the honor of being chose in
spite of my team far more flattering and special than being honored
because of my team. If you're chosen as an All-Star when your team has a
16-24 record and hasn't won consecutive games since November, you must
have been really, really good this season.

Jrue Holiday has been really, really good this season. Better
than we would have thought, better than we could have expected, better
than we might've even hoped. He was put in just about every possible
position to flounder—given far more responsibility than he had in
previous years, but with far fewer weapons to work with—and still
managed to put up not just career numbers, but numbers nobody else in
the league is putting up. (The list of players averaging 19 points and
nine assists starts and ends with Jrue.) When watching him put in a
signature takeover performance during that game against the Raptors, I
posed the question (to myself) "Has watching Jrue this year been worth
having to watch the rest of the team?" I concluded that indeed, it had.

Jrue's numbers (and he's not just a numbers guy, he's damn
impressive to watch as well) have been good enough this year that his
All-Star candidacy should've been a no-brainer. But certain
coaches—let's call one of them D. Collins, for example—insist that when
choosing All-Stars, you work from the top of the standings down, and if
you come up with enough plausible candidates before you get to the 9th
and 10th seeds, tough luck for the guys on those lottery-bound teams.

And so candidates like Brooklyn's Deron Williams, Milwaukee's
Brandon Jennings, and especially New York's J.R. Smith were given
protracted consideration for All-Star status, with three of the four TNT
analysts choosing Smith to just one (Barkley, duh) going to bat for The
Damaja. No matter that all three's stats were easily inferior to
Holiday, that D-Will was so bad at the start of the year that his coach
basically got fired for it, and that Milwaukee and New York would gladly
trade either Jennings or Smith for Holiday in a heartbeat—these guys
were on teams with winning records, therefore they must have been
worthier than Holiday.

Thankfully, Jrue was the one who got the nod—along with the
Cavaliers' Kyrie Irving, who had an even worse record (but arguably an
even more impressive season) than Holiday. As happy as I was that Jrue
had been selected, it's nothing compared to how angry I would've been if
we were deprived of the One Good Thing that could've come out of the
Bynumless era of the 2012-13 76ers because coaches decided that other
dudes should be awarded for having better teammates. The TNT bros still
waxed infuriantingly rhapsodic about Smith's snub—et tu, Ernie
Johnson?—but whatever. Justice was done.

So for the second straight year, the Sixers have a first-time
All-Star. But more than Iguodala's selection last year—which, while not
undeserved, was certainly helped dramatically by the Liberty Ballers'
excellent first half to the season—this one really feels earned. The
Sixers have been awful to watch this year, but at least we have Jrue,
one of the best guys in the East, representing for us, making sure we
don't fade into total national anonymity as we wait for Bynum's legs to
grow back. We can't wait to see him running the fast break with Paul
George and getting backdoor feeds from Joakim Noah in Houston a couple
weeks from now.

Doug Pederson: Dak Prescott knew he didn't have to win by himself

Doug Pederson: Dak Prescott knew he didn't have to win by himself

For the most part, Carson Wentz had a pretty successful rookie season. 

Sure, the Eagles finished with a 7-9 record, but Wentz did enough to continue the franchise's belief that he is indeed the quarterback of the future. 

Another guy in Dallas did the same thing with the Cowboys. Actually, Dak Prescott had an even more impressive rookie season, leading the Cowboys to 13 wins, while winning the Offensive Rookie of the Year award. 

Prescott, a fourth-round pick, had a great year, but didn't try to do too much. And that's what impressed Eagles head coach Doug Pederson the most. 

"[Prescott] understood this right away, that he didn't have to win the game for them," Pederson said on The Doomsday Podcast, hosted by Matt Mosley and Ed Werder. (Pederson also talked about running the Rocky steps). "He knew that he had a good defense, a tremendous offensive line, a great runner, he had some veteran players that he could rely on and he learned that early. As soon as he had the opportunity to play and that was early, from Day 1. 

"That's something that a young quarterback, sometimes it takes them a while to figure out the game that way. That's the impressive thing, that he learned how to handle that business that well, utilize the people around him and understand that he didn't have to go win the game."

While Prescott had plenty of help during his rookie season, it was pretty evident Wentz was lacking in that area. 

Prescott had a great offensive line, Dez Bryant, Ezekiel Elliott and others. Wentz had an offensive line that was missing Lane Johnson, an often-injured Ryan Mathews and receivers like Nelson Agholor and Dorial Green-Beckham playing serious snaps. 

So it made sense when the team went out this offseason and signed Alshon Jeffery, Torrey Smith, and recently LeGarrette Blount, as free agents, finally getting Wentz some real help. 

"We had opportunities to get those two guys and it was obvious last year, we were young at the wide receiver position," Peterson said. "We needed some leadership, some veteran presence there and we went out and got that with Torrey and Alshon. We still want to build through the draft, we still want to acquire young talent. 

"LeGarrette Blount now is a guy that gives us that big back, running back, that can come in and compete and hopefully he does everything he did at New England the last couple of seasons. He had 18 rushing touchdowns for over 1,000 yards and we just expect that same level of performance here."

Maybe having weapons will allow Wentz to do what made Prescott so impressive to Pederson in 2016: not too much. 

Tonight's lineup: Michael Saunders dropped to eighth in order

Tonight's lineup: Michael Saunders dropped to eighth in order

Pete Mackanin is still searching for answers to the Phillies' offensive woes following Sunday afternoon's disheartening 1-0 loss in Pittsburgh during which the Phils could only muster three hits.

The latest lineup twist as the search for an answer continues will see Michael Saunders bat in the eight-hole tonight as the Phils open a four-game series with the surging Rockies tonight at Citizens Bank Park (see game notes).

When he has started this season, Saunders has been a fixture within the middle of the Phillies' order. After all, the offseason free-agent signing was an All-Star for Toronto last season when he hit 24 homers and drove in 57 runs.

But this season hasn't gone as planned as Saunders is hitting just .232 with four homers and 15 RBI in 41 games with the Phils this season.

With Saunders' drop down the lineup, Tommy Joseph will bat fourth, Maikel Franco fifth and Odubel Herrera sixth against Rockies spot starter Jeff Hoffman.

Tonight's full lineups can be found below:

Phillies
1. Cesar Hernandez 2B
2. Freddy Galvis SS
3. Aaron Altherr LF
4. Tommy Joseph 1B
5. Maikel Franco 3B
6. Odubel Herrera CF
7. Cameron Rupp C
8. Michael Saunders RF
9. Jerad Eickhoff SP

Rockies
1. Charlie Blackmon CF
2. D.J. LeMehiau 2B
3. Nolan Arenado 3B
4. Carlos Gonzalez RF
5. Mark  Reynolds 1B
6. Gerardo Parra LF
7. Alexi Amarista SS
8. Tony Wolters C
9. Jeff Hoffman SP