So What Are the Odds Galvis Is Getting Hosed?

So What Are the Odds Galvis Is Getting Hosed?

At least one person wasn't so quick to jump to the conclusion Freddy Galvis was doing anything that might be construed as "juicing." Shortly after the news of the 50-game suspension broke late Tuesday afternoon, John Finger tweeted this link, which suggests the substance the young second baseman was taking -- Clostebol -- might have other, less incriminating ways of entering the blood stream.
A paper submitted by a group of doctors to an international journal of clinical laboratory science known as Clinical Chemistry (bear with us) put forth the suggestion back in 2004 that trace amounts of Clostebol could enter the blood steam another way.
The most likely of those seemed to be simply by taking a prescribed medication containing this substance, but one claim even pegged the contamination on sex. Supposedly, if your partner happens to be taking a drug with Clostebol, trace amounts of the drug could be transferred through intercourse. Wild.
Galvis seemingly maintained his innocence in his apology statement yesterday, and at least for some folks, the parts-per-trillion or whatever (we're science-y) in his urine was so low as to not trigger full-on skepticism as to how the drug ended up in his system. Others wanted to defend the kid's character, or point out that he wasn't hitting the ball a ton -- not that that's definitive one way or the other. Still others merely assumed that what was accused was true, because the only thing surprising about PED suspensions anymore is the "who."
Further clouding matters is that while Galvis has denied intent, he either accepted his suspension without appeal or privately appealed and was denied. Ruben Amaro Jr would not comment on whether there was an appeal. Instead, Galvis simply apologized, seeming all too eager to quickly put this whole situation behind him.
It can't hurt he'll be serving his 50 games on the disabled list, but we shouldn't automatically think appealing only serves to delay his return to the diamond. If Galvis is caught again, the punishment only gets worse next time. Even if a guilty user isn't concerned with clearing his name, he probably doesn't want to earn a strike, especially not at the age of 22.
The suspension is unfortunate, and after years and years of finger pointing over steroids and other PEDs in baseball, the logical conclusion when MLB comes down on a guy is he must be caught red handed. Maybe Freddy Galvis turns out to be one of those guys, but maybe there was more to the story as well.

Best of NHL: Trocheck's last-second goal lifts Panthers past Blues

Best of NHL: Trocheck's last-second goal lifts Panthers past Blues

ST. LOUIS -- Vincent Trocheck scored with just under 5 seconds remaining to lift the Florida Panthers to a 2-1 victory over the St. Louis Blues on Monday night.

Jonathan Marchessault also scored and James Reimer stopped 26 shots to help the Panthers complete a 5-0 road trip -- their first perfect trip of at least that many games in franchise history.

Reimer has won five straight decisions and has not lost in regulation since Jan. 7 against Boston, going 6-0-1 since.

The Panthers moved into a tie with Boston for third place in the Atlantic Division, but have the edge because they have a game in hand on the Bruins.

Kyle Brodziak, playing for the second time after missing 10 games due to a broken foot, scored for the Blues and Jake Allen finished with 31 saves. St. Louis lost its second straight since winning six in a row (see full recap).

Coyotes use three-goal 1st period to beat Ducks
GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Radim Vrbata capped Arizona's three-goal first period and the Coyotes held on for 3-2 victory over the Anaheim Ducks on Monday night.

Christian Dvorak and Jakob Chychrun also scored for Arizona, and starting goalie Mike Smith had 27 saves before leaving about 4 1/2 minutes into the third period after a collision in the net. Marek Langhamer helped kill a power play after being pressed into action for his NHL debut and stopped six of the seven shots he faced.

The Coyotes have won four of their last six.

Langhamer gave up Ryan Getzlaf's second goal of the night with 26.8 seconds to play, but thwarted two quality shots in the final seconds.

Jonathan Bernier gave up three goals on six shots in the first period for the Ducks. John Gibson came on to start the second and stopped all 14 shots he faced (see full recap).

Joel Embiid admits to reaggravating foot injury after 2014 surgery, almost quitting

Joel Embiid admits to reaggravating foot injury after 2014 surgery, almost quitting

Joel Embiid trusts the Process, more so than anyone — the process of patience.

After sitting out two whole seasons because of foot injuries, Embiid learned the importance of patience the hard way.

Appearing on NBA TV's Open Court, Joel Embiid opened up about how he reaggravated the fracture in his foot that cost him the 2015-16 season.

"I didn't know how to deal with patience," Embiid said on the roundtable discussion. "I just wanted to do stuff, that's why I think I needed a second surgery, because after my first one, I just wanted to play basketball again. I just wanted to be on the court and I pushed through what I wasn't supposed to.

"At one point I thought about quitting. I just wanted to come back home and just forget everything."

Embiid goes on to discuss the Sixers' turnaround this season and his mindset during his recovery. Watch the full clip below. 

Embiid also said he models his game after Hakeem Olajuwon.