Need a Philly Sports Fix? Here's a Union Primer

Need a Philly Sports Fix? Here's a Union Primer

The Phillies crashed and burned in the NLDS. The Eagles are 1-4. The Flyers, who are off to a phenomenal start, are just three games into an 82 game season. The Sixers? Well, the NBA might be a while.

So, where can you turn during a sports crisis like this? Where and how should you reallocate your suddenly available sports watching hours?

How about the Union?

Now, I realize that for whatever reason a large percentage of you are anti-soccer. That’s fine. I am not here to convert you. I am simply saying that if you are reading this site you are a sports fan. You enjoy watching teams or individuals compete.

You particularly enjoy watching games where the home team is good, the stands are full, the crowd is invested, and the tension is palpable. How much fun is it to watch the Phillies play at Citizens Bank Park in front of a sellout crowd hanging on each pitch? How great is it to watch a game being played at the Palestra?

It’s a fairly easy equation. Competitive Philadelphia Team + Boisterous Crowd = Compelling Sports Television.

Week in and week out PPL Park is bonkers. The Union average 18,201 fans. The team is in first place. It’s a good time to hop on board.

In the event you are worried, I can assure you that you will not turn into that pinko commie soccer loving caricature by simply watching a game. I promise.

In case you are joining this season already in progress here’s what you need to know.

WHERE THEY STAND

The Union, in just their second season, sit in first place in the MLS Eastern Conference. They host Toronto FC tomorrow in the final home game of the regular season. Win and they clinch a playoff berth.

I am not going to get into all the possible playoff permutations. What you need to know is that if the Union win their last two games they’ll finish first in the East.

WHO TO WATCH

The best player is Sebastien Le Toux. He’s a classic Philly fan favorite. Yes, he leads the team in both goals and assists, but what makes him special is his effort. Le Toux has played every minute of every league game. His work rate is off the charts. He never stops running. Ever.

ORGANIZATIONAL PHILOSOPHY

Fifteen of the twenty-seven players on the roster are 23 years old or younger. Yes, their most important players (Le Toux, Danny Califf, Carlos Valdes, Brian Carroll, and Faryd Mondragon) are all older than 23, but the organization has placed a premium on identifying young talent.

No matter the sport you need to be strong up the middle. It’s no coincidence that the Union deploy their veteran players in the middle of the field. Mondragon, Califf, Valdes, Carroll, and Le Toux are the spine of the formation.

The rest of the starting lineup is composed primarily of young players. The other six starting spots usually come down to some combination of the under-23 group of players.

THE KEY YOUNGSTERS

Freddy Adu (22 years old) – Yes, he’s still only 22. He scored last week against Seattle and is rounding into form.

Michael Farfan (23 years old) – A revelation on the outside. Crafty beyond his years.

Gabriel Farfan (23 years old) – Michael’s twin brother has filled the void created by the trade of Jordan Harvey.

Zac MacMath (20 years old) PICTURED – Has stepped in and gone 3-0-4 in relief of the injured Mondragon.

Jack McInerney (19 years old) – A striker with an uncanny ability to get behind opposing defenses.

Danny Mwanga (20 years old) – The former first overall pick is coming back from injury. The most physically talented of the Union forwards.

Amobi Okugo (20 years old) – A ball-winning midfielder who could develop into a box-to-box midfielder.

Zach Pfeffer (16 years old) – The Upper Dublin native has seen some important minutes down the stretch. A future playmaker in the midfield.

Roger Torres (20 years old) – The most creative player on the team. Brings a much-needed offensive mindset to the midfield.

Sheanon Williams (21 years old) – Runs all day. Gets forward. His long throw-ins are a dangerous weapon.

THE COACH

Peter Nowak has won an MLS Cup as both a player (Chicago Fire) and coach (D.C. United). He’s a hardnosed coach who wants his players to attack, attack, attack. He’s probably the most intimidating coach in Philadelphia since Mike Keenan. Would destroy Keenan in a tough-guy staredown.

WHERE TO WATCH

Saturday’s game against Toronto will be on Comcast SportsNet (4PM). You could also do a lot worse than spending a Saturday afternoon tailgating outside of PPL Park prior to kickoff.

Tickets are tough to come by, but there’s always a handful available online. The weather should be nice -- mid-60’s, no rain.

The game will be over at 6ish, which transitions nicely into the Flyers/Kings game and Mike Richards’ return to Philly.

Union soccer. Seriously.

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Photos from the Union on Facebook and US Presswire

Sixers beat Pelicans without Joel Embiid leading the way

uspresswire-sixers-ilyasova-rodriguez.jpg
USA Today Images

Sixers beat Pelicans without Joel Embiid leading the way

BOX SCORE

NEW ORLEANS -- Joel Embiid shot just 5 for 15 from the field and the Sixers … wait … the Sixers won. 

Surprising? Actually, that’s just how the Sixers envision finding success.

It’s not about Embiid having a relatively quiet night on offense with 14 points, especially going 0 for 5 from three. It’s about other players getting involved and taking the burden off the rookie. Embiid has proved he can do a lot of things, but carrying a team each night in his first season isn’t what the Sixers have in mind. 

“I think that’s when we’re at our best,” Nik Stauskas said after the Sixers beat the Pelicans 99-88 (see Instant Replay). “Obviously there are a few guys in the NBA like a LeBron (James), KD (Kevin Durant) or Steph (Curry) that can single-handedly win a game throughout the entire season. But most of the teams are going to rely on bench players to step up and make shots and make plays. I think that’s when we’re most effective.”

Embiid entered Thursday night averaging 24.3 points and shooting 48.9 percent in Sixers wins (three games played). His 14 points against the Pelicans were his fewest in a victory this season. He also grabbed seven boards with four blocks and three steals. Embiid was a game-high plus-27, which Brett Brown called "massive."

Instead of being powered offensively by their centerpiece, the Sixers received solid efforts from the starters and reserves. Ersan Ilyasova scored 23 points (along with eight rebounds) for the second straight game. Sergio Rodriguez chipped in 16 points and eight assists. Off the bench,  Stauskas hit three treys en route to 14 points while Dario Saric scored 10 points with five rebounds as the team snapped an overall eight-game losing skid and a 23-game road losing streak. 

Embiid’s teammates attribute their success to the fact he is such a focal point of the opponents’ defense. In comparison to the beginning of the season when Embiid was getting stifled by double-teams, he has been learning how to pass out of them. Embiid expects to see two defenders every game and has been making adjustments to create opportunities for others to shoot rather than committing turnovers. 

“We’re not standing around a lot and just focusing on what Jo can do,” Robert Covington said. “Jo is making great moves to find guys that are open. He’s willing to pass. We’re starting to build the chemistry that everyone’s been looking for.”

Ilyasova has noticed a change in the flow of the offense and has capitalized on defensive mismatches when opponents swarm Embiid. 

“We just share the ball well,” Ilyasova said. “I find myself open. Obviously Joel does a great job of as far as when there is a double-team, just kicking out. When I see the open look, I try to knock that shot down.” 

This style of play is mutually beneficial for both Embiid and his teammates. Just because Embiid is passing out doesn't mean he's not getting his looks. Oftentimes, dishing out of a double-team allows him to get a better look on the next touch. 

“It’s a team effort," Covington said. "We’re doing so much as a unit that we’re not just focusing on just get Jo the ball and let him do his thing. He’s getting the ball, he’s surveying the floor and then he’s making his moves. He’s reading the defense really well. He’s doing a lot of [kicking out]. Then we find him a lot of re-posts and finding the open shot and making it easy for him to find the easy bucket.” 

Embiid is capable of scoring 20-plus in spite of his 28-minute restriction. The Sixers are making strides, though, by finding ways to win when he isn’t the running up the scoreboard. 

“I think there’s no doubt Jo is our best player and our offense is going to revolve around him most of the time,” Stauskas said. “But we’re playing our best when he’s posting up and kicking out to guys and they’re hitting threes or we’re taking pressure off him by making plays and the defense can’t just be solely focused on him. In a game like tonight, that’s kind of what you saw.”

Connor McDavid: Brandon Manning made 'classless' comments about injury

Connor McDavid: Brandon Manning made 'classless' comments about injury

Connor McDavid scored his first power-play goal of the season in the second period during the Flyers' 6-5 win on Thursday night (see Instant Replay). After his 12th goal of the year, McDavid made a point to stare down and exchange words with Flyers defenseman Brandon Manning.

In the first period, Manning and McDavid were in the middle of a scrum after the whistle, chirping each other (see 10 observations). The battle between the two roots back to when Manning broke the rising superstar’s collarbone November 2015 during a play against the boards in Edmonton.

“You know what, I did all I could defending him last year in the media," McDavid said after Thursday's game. "I didn’t want to make a big deal saying he did it on purpose.

"He wanted to make some comments today about what went on last year and I thought it was one of the classless things I’ve ever seen on the ice. He said some things and our guys responded accordingly.

"We can put the whole 'he did it on purpose' thing to rest, because what he said out there confirmed that. It shows what kind of guy he is, how he doesn’t step up and fight some of our guys.”

Manning received death threats from Edmonton fans last season, and responded after the game Thursday, reiterating the play that injured McDavid was an accident.

"I think anybody who knows me or who has played with or against me along the road here," Manning said, "knows that I am not that kind of player. I am not out there intentionally trying to hurt people. I'm a guy who plays the game hard and I take pride in that.

"I think going back to last year, it was a total accident. I mean, there were three players involved and there was never any intention of hurting anyone."

The injury ended up costing McDavid a few months, and a year later, the tension is still high between him and Manning.

As the second period moved along, McDavid continued to make plays for the Oilers. At the 4:35 mark in the second period, he took the puck away from the Flyers and then helped set up Andrej Sekera for a shorthanded goal that tied the game, 3-3.

The shorthanded goal helped give the Oilers momentum at the end of the period, but they could not carry it over to the third. The loss Thursday is the second night in a row in which Edmonton lost a game it looked like it was going to win.

“I’m not too sure what it is but I think we will figure it out,” McDavid said. "I’m not too sure what it is, like I said before. Something we need to figure out real fast here.”