Philadelphia Union midfielder among the Mexican soccer fans that love Estados Unidos 'forever and ever'

Philadelphia Union midfielder among the Mexican soccer fans that love Estados Unidos 'forever and ever'

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oz1XhaBT45I
In what might have been the most dramatic US soccer moment since this, the Americans scored two stoppage-time goals to stun Panama 3-2 in the final game of World Cup qualifying last night.

The drama, though, wasn’t concerning the US, which had already secured a World Cup berth and was fielding a lineup of mostly second-stringers trying to book their own place in Brazil 2014.

The drama involved Panama – which, before the American rally, was minutes away from an unlikely fourth-place finish in CONCACAF that would have set them up with a two-game playoff with New Zealand for a World Cup berth. And, more than anything else, it involved Mexico, which was losing 2-1 to Costa Rica at the exact same time of the US-Panama game and needed a US tie or win to avoid being passed by Panama and missing out on the World Cup for the first time since 1982.

Knowing those stakes, there were plenty of American fans that would have been perfectly content seeing their favorite team lose, only because it would mean so much devastation for their Mexican rivals. The final few minutes of both games were not nearly as much fun for El Tri supporters, like the Philadelphia Union’s Mexican-born midfielder Cristhian Hernandez.

https://twitter.com/amobisays/status/390315718073647104
And then, just like that, Graham Zusi scored a goal that gutted Panama, thrilled Mexico and showed how prideful this American team can be.

The jubilant Mexican announcer in the epic video above said it all when, after seeing the US goal on a split screen, exclaimed: “Gooooooal Estados Unidos! We love you! We love you forever and ever! God bless America!”

Hernandez was equally excited, and may have even expressed that excitement with a meal for his Union teammates today.


But what do the American fans think about the Zusi goal that kept Mexico’s World Cup dream alive? We might find out when Zusi’s Sporting Kansas City team plays its next road game – which just happens to be at PPL Park on Oct. 26.
https://twitter.com/amobisays/status/390316472377303040
Count Union manager John Hackworth as one of the Americans who was conflicted about last night's results. At his weekly press conference today, the longest-tenured coach in Philly pro sports noted that "it was a crazy situation because I’m cheering for the US and at the same time, I’m thinking, What am I doing? Because If I’m cheering for the US, I’m cheering for Mexico too."

But the former US national team assistant coach eventually got over that feeling and was thrilled that the goal was not only scored by an MLS player but was set up by another one in Houston's Brad Davis. (He also thought Real Salt Lake's Kyle Beckerman was the best player on the field.) And while Hackworth believes last night's results say a lot about how the fierce US-Mexico rivalry has changed, he's now prepared to cheer on Mexico in their two-game series with New Zealand.

"For a long time, people thought Mexico was untouchable and far ahead of the US," Hackworth said. "The reality is that's not the case right now. We just helped them both financially and the way they feel about themselves. It's remarkable. I'm enjoying it. At the same time, I do hope they go beat New Zealand and represent CONCACAF so we have four teams in the World Cup - and that all four teams do well."

Cold can't keep Joel Embiid away from first Sixers practice

Cold can't keep Joel Embiid away from first Sixers practice

STOCKTON, N.J. — Joel Embiid awoke Tuesday morning and was still feeling ill from a cold and virus he has been battling since last Friday. He had been coughing, experiencing a bloody nose and even vomiting, but all those symptoms could not stop him from a day he has been eyeing for over two years: his first NBA practice.

Embiid had stayed back in Philadelphia on Monday night while the Sixers traveled to training camp at Stockton University in South Jersey. On Tuesday, he decided to leave the city and join the team on campus.

“I woke up this morning and I was like, ‘I waited too long for this time, so I’ve got to go and try to do some work in there,’” Embiid said.

Embiid had been sidelined by foot injuries since the Sixers drafted him third overall in 2014. Tuesday marked his first NBA practice, and he is eyeing his first preseason game next Tuesday against the Celtics.

Embiid was not expected to be part of training camp Tuesday because of his illness. He surprised the team when he arrived while practice was underway. The Sixers' medical staff cleared him before he took the court.

“He forced himself into practice today,” head coach Brett Brown said. “He said, ‘I feel good, I want to go.’ With the time that he has put in the last few years, he meant it. You respected that instruction.”

Embiid is following a minutes restriction during training camp, which currently is 25 minutes for the morning session and 20 minutes for the evening session. His previous physical restrictions have been lifted and the team is monitoring him for workload and time on the court.

“I step back and figure out how do I want to spend my money?” Brown said. “If we’ve got X amount of time, where do I feel like he can make the most improvement? Where do I feel like he’s going to have the best chance to get on the court and play minutes, as we expect against the Celtics?”

Tuesday morning’s session focused on the defensive end. While Embiid had trouble breathing at points and tired quickly, he made an effort to give 100 percent on the court. The only lags in Embiid’s game Brown noticed were attributed to his illness, not because of his foot.

“I don’t think he’s missed a beat from a great month of September,” Brown said.

The Sixers sensed the enthusiasm from Embiid. Regardless of his restrictions, his energy was felt among the team.

“When he did get in, he played well,” Ben Simmons said. “He’s a big inside presence. He got a lot of boards and crashed the offensive glass.”

Added Jahlil Okafor: "He’s excited to be here. Obviously, he’s had a couple tough years with his injuries that he couldn’t control. But he’s finally here and he’s taking advantage of that."

The Sixers will hold training camp through Friday at Stockton University. Embiid is looking to push past any symptoms to be on the court as much as he can.

Nerlens Noel's complaints only damage Sixers' trade leverage

Nerlens Noel's complaints only damage Sixers' trade leverage

Silence is golden.

It's a phrase uttered often by parents and teachers. It can also be an effective phrase when dealing with negotiations.

I'm not revealing a big secret by saying the Sixers have a logjam in their frontcourt. At some point, something has to give.

Nerlens Noel, a key component of the aforementioned logjam, doubled down on his quotes from over the weekend about the Sixers' "silly" frontcourt situation.

"I don't see a way it can work," Noel said on Monday. "It's just a logjam. You have three young, talented centers that can play 30-plus minutes a night."

Uh-oh.

Bryan Colangelo acknowledged that teams have been trying to "poach" a big man off him. He's been adamant in saying that he's not shopping any of his bigs. For leverage purposes, that's wise.

Any leverage Colangelo may have accrued through his media tour this summer took a hit. With the health of Joel Embiid still a question mark, it's important that the Sixers take a wait-and-see approach to their situation. Noel may have just put a damper on that plan.

I'm not advocating for the trade of Noel and keeping Jahlil Okafor. In fact, I've said that if Embiid proves he's healthy, I'd move both Noel and Okafor if the value was appropriate.

There can be arguments made for keeping Noel over the other two centers. His athleticism and rim protection skills fit Brett Brown's system and the way the NBA is trending. And it's important to note that Noel isn't wrong. It won't benefit him to take a cut in minutes. It won't help Okafor either. It's not the most pleasant situation to be sure. He has every right to be unhappy, but getting the media involved doesn't benefit Noel or the Sixers.

Anyone in any job should have the right to speak out if they feel they're being slighted, but sometimes you have to "play the game." If Noel were a poker player, he just revealed his hand. He should've shown up, said the right things and allowed Colangelo to negotiate a deal.

The best parallel is what the Eagles and Sam Bradford went through this offseason. Bradford was unhappy the Eagles traded valuable draft picks to acquire Carson Wentz. Understandable, but when he threw his rattle down and sat out part of camp, it helped nobody. The Broncos tried to lowball Howie Roseman, figuring Roseman had no leverage with Bradford's intent to get traded out of town. Roseman stood his ground and the Eagles were able to hold the Vikings hostage when Teddy Bridgewater suffered a season-ending knee injury.

It's not something you hope for by any means, but these things happen. Players get hurt and teams are left scrambling to find a replacement. Take a look at the Chris Bosh situation with the Miami Heat. Bosh, who's had a tremendous career, will likely never play again because of issues with blood clots. The Heat are likely not a match for the Sixers given defensive-minded center Hassan Whiteside's new contract, but the point is that you never know what will happen between now and opening night.

For Bradford, it was resolved just a week before the season started. If Noel follows suit with Bradford, perhaps there will be a similar solution.

"Things need to get situated," Noel said. "I think things obviously need to be moved around, someone needs to be moved around. It's just a tough situation. I can't really say too much because I have no say in the matter, so obviously that's for who can handle the situation in the right manner."

Well, Nerlens, you said too much already.