Philadelphia Union midfielder among the Mexican soccer fans that love Estados Unidos 'forever and ever'

Philadelphia Union midfielder among the Mexican soccer fans that love Estados Unidos 'forever and ever'
In what might have been the most dramatic US soccer moment since this, the Americans scored two stoppage-time goals to stun Panama 3-2 in the final game of World Cup qualifying last night.

The drama, though, wasn’t concerning the US, which had already secured a World Cup berth and was fielding a lineup of mostly second-stringers trying to book their own place in Brazil 2014.

The drama involved Panama – which, before the American rally, was minutes away from an unlikely fourth-place finish in CONCACAF that would have set them up with a two-game playoff with New Zealand for a World Cup berth. And, more than anything else, it involved Mexico, which was losing 2-1 to Costa Rica at the exact same time of the US-Panama game and needed a US tie or win to avoid being passed by Panama and missing out on the World Cup for the first time since 1982.

Knowing those stakes, there were plenty of American fans that would have been perfectly content seeing their favorite team lose, only because it would mean so much devastation for their Mexican rivals. The final few minutes of both games were not nearly as much fun for El Tri supporters, like the Philadelphia Union’s Mexican-born midfielder Cristhian Hernandez.
And then, just like that, Graham Zusi scored a goal that gutted Panama, thrilled Mexico and showed how prideful this American team can be.

The jubilant Mexican announcer in the epic video above said it all when, after seeing the US goal on a split screen, exclaimed: “Gooooooal Estados Unidos! We love you! We love you forever and ever! God bless America!”

Hernandez was equally excited, and may have even expressed that excitement with a meal for his Union teammates today.

But what do the American fans think about the Zusi goal that kept Mexico’s World Cup dream alive? We might find out when Zusi’s Sporting Kansas City team plays its next road game – which just happens to be at PPL Park on Oct. 26.
Count Union manager John Hackworth as one of the Americans who was conflicted about last night's results. At his weekly press conference today, the longest-tenured coach in Philly pro sports noted that "it was a crazy situation because I’m cheering for the US and at the same time, I’m thinking, What am I doing? Because If I’m cheering for the US, I’m cheering for Mexico too."

But the former US national team assistant coach eventually got over that feeling and was thrilled that the goal was not only scored by an MLS player but was set up by another one in Houston's Brad Davis. (He also thought Real Salt Lake's Kyle Beckerman was the best player on the field.) And while Hackworth believes last night's results say a lot about how the fierce US-Mexico rivalry has changed, he's now prepared to cheer on Mexico in their two-game series with New Zealand.

"For a long time, people thought Mexico was untouchable and far ahead of the US," Hackworth said. "The reality is that's not the case right now. We just helped them both financially and the way they feel about themselves. It's remarkable. I'm enjoying it. At the same time, I do hope they go beat New Zealand and represent CONCACAF so we have four teams in the World Cup - and that all four teams do well."

Doug Pederson not afraid to get agressive with play-calling

Doug Pederson not afraid to get agressive with play-calling

Talk to Doug Pederson and he comes across … what’s a nice way to put it … dry?

Very nice guy. Very friendly. Very down to Earth. But not the most dynamic personality in public.

Which is why his personality on gameday has been so surprising.

Pederson is a risk taker as a playcaller. Aggressive and fearless.

Whether it’s going for it on fourth down with the lead, going for two after a successful PAT or throwing deep in a situation that doesn’t necessarily call for it, Pederson has proven to be the proverbial riverboat gambler that Chip Kelly was expected to be but never became.

“My personality is probably a little more conservative by nature, I think,” Pederson said Monday. “You'd probably agree with that.”

Pederson got a laugh with that comment because his public persona is exactly the opposite of his gameday demeanor.

It only took one day before we all got a taste of Pederson’s fearlessness.

In the season opener against the Browns, with the Eagles clinging to a 15-10 lead and a rookie quarterback making his first NFL appearance and a 4th-and-4 at the Browns’ 40--yard-line, he kept the offense on the field.

Carson Wentz responded by connecting with Zach Ertz on a five-yard gain to move the chains, and one play later, the Eagles took command on Wentz’s 35-yard TD pass to Nelson Agholor.

Six weeks in, the Eagles are 5 for 5 on fourth down. Only the Falcons have converted more fourth downs in the NFL this year, and they’re 6 for 10.

In the win over the Bears, the Eagles were 3 for 3 on fourth down, their best fourth-down conversion day in nine years.

This is the first time in 14 years the Eagles have converted five or more fourth downs through six games.

According to Pro Football Reference, the Eagles are one of only seven teams in NFL history to attempt five or more fourth down plays through six games and still be at 100 percent. The Lions are also 5 for 5 this year.

Pederson said analytics are a big part of his decision-making process, but he also trusts his instincts.

“I think it's both,” Pederson said. “But I trust our guys and I trust our offensive line and I think it sends a great message to the rest of the team, to the defense and special teams, that, ‘Hey, if we can convert this and stay on the field,’ it sends a good message.

“And on the other side of that, if you do convert, (it’s about) the message you send to the other team and the fact that you're going to stay aggressive.”

The Eagles are 29th-best in the NFL on third down at just 34 percent. But they’re one of only three teams that’s at 100 percent on fourth down.

“It's kind of a crazy deal when you're not great on third down, but you can be 5 for 5 on fourth down and convert them,” Pederson said. “It's a weird deal. But credit to the guys for the execution.

“I'm going to continue to look at it. I don't ever want to be in a position that I'm going to jeopardize the team at the time (by being too aggressive). Looking at the five fourth-down decisions this year, I don’t think they put us in any harm at that time.”

Wentz is 3 for 3 for 21 yards on fourth down, with the four-yard completion to Ertz, a seven-yard first down to Jordan Matthews in the Bears game and a nine-yard to Dorial Green-Beckham, also in the win in Chicago.

He also rushed six yards for a first down on a 4th-and-2 Sunday in the win over the Vikings. The Eagles’ other fourth-down conversion this year was Ryan Mathews’ one-yard TD on a 4th-and-goal against Chicago.

Pederson said as an assistant coach under Andy Reid, he always found himself asking himself whether he would be conservative or aggressive in crucial situations.

We’re all learning the answer now.

“Yeah, you definitely put yourself in those situations, as a coordinator and a position coach,” he said. “Putting yourself in those spots, it's a lot easier when you're not making the decision obviously to go, ‘Oh, yeah, I would have not gone for it there or not gone for it there.’

“Now, being in this position, it's my tail on the line if we don't convert.”

6 months later, Cubs' Kyle Schwarber returns for World Series Game 1

6 months later, Cubs' Kyle Schwarber returns for World Series Game 1

CLEVELAND — Chicago Cubs slugger Kyle Schwarber's rehab finished just in time for the World Series.

Schwarber will bat fifth and be the designated hitter for the National League champions in Game 1 on Tuesday night against Cleveland's Corey Kluber. Schwarber hasn't played in the majors since tearing ligaments in his left knee on April 7 in a collision with teammate Dexter Fowler.

Dallas Cowboys orthopedic surgeon Dr. Daniel Cooper operated 12 days later to repair torn anterior cruciate and lateral collateral ligaments. He was expected to miss the rest of the season but was cleared to return on Oct. 17.

Schwarber played a pair of games in the Arizona Fall League, going 1 for 6 with a double and two walks, and flew to Cleveland on Monday.