Philadelphia Union reserve Matt Kassel injures American hero Brek Shea in exhibition, gets booed by own fans

Philadelphia Union reserve Matt Kassel injures American hero Brek Shea in exhibition, gets booed by own fans

It’s a rare thing for a player to be booed at home while an opposing player walks off the field to cheers.

But last night in an international friendly at PPL Park, Philadelphia Union reserve Matt Kassel managed to accomplish such a feat.

In the 27th minute, with the Union trailing Stoke City of the English Premier League by a pair of goals, Kassel went in for a hard tackle on Stoke City winger Brek Shea. Kassel was shown a yellow card and booed the next couple of times he touched the ball, while Shea limped off the field as “U-S-A” chants rained down from the PPL Park seats.

Here’s why: just two days ago, Shea had become one of the few US soccer players to ever score a tournament-winning goal when he netted the only goal in a 1-0 win over Panama in the Gold Cup final. Then, the rising American star met up with his Stoke City teammates in Philly, scored another goal, and promptly sustained what could be a serious knee injury in a meaningless exhibition.

You can see the video of Shea's goal at the 29:45 mark and would be able to see the injury at around the 37:55 mark if not for an ad for a 50/50 raffle. (This seems suspicious but I’m told it’s a coincidence. The stream was taken directly from what was shown on the video board since there was no broadcast and it just happened that the 50/50 ad went up right before the tackle.)

As you might expect, Stoke City manager Mark Hughes did not handle it well, saying he expected Shea to be out “for a number of weeks at least,” calling it “a very, very poor challenge by the boy,” and even calling into question Kassel’s motives.

“You don’t expect that,” Hughes said. “It’s a friendly game. You need to protect your fellow professional. And I don’t think the guy did that. I don’t know who he was. Maybe he was trying to make a name for himself. I don’t know. He went the wrong way about it.”

Hughes’ quotes perhaps seem a little bit harsh but the timing couldn’t have been worse, considering Shea was coming off such a huge goal and was heading into the English Premier League season with a lot of confidence.

To his credit, Shea handled it relatively well, admitting he was “pretty upset” but also making sure to say he’s not mad at Kassel. Shea’s best quote after the game: “When I was walking off, he apologized. And I said, ‘Shit happens.’”

As for Kassel, he expressed a lot of remorse after the game and apologized again to Shea. But the player previously best known for sorta sharing a name with an NFL quarterback is getting absolutely hammered online – by US Soccer and Stoke City fans – as you can see from the comments in the article I wrote for MLSsoccer.com.


Let’s hope for everyone’s sake that Shea’s injury is not that serious. But no matter what, Kassel should learn from this and not make such hard tackles in exhibitions, even if he is trying to prove he deserves more playing time.

Or he could just take teammate Amobi Okugo’s advice and tackle players that aren’t, you know, American heroes coming off championship-winning goals.

Laughed Okugo, "We all made fun of Kassel - like why aren’t you trying to take out someone like [Honduran Wilson] Palacios or someone else that’s in CONCACAF?”

Phillies will take a peek at Tim Tebow, mostly out of curiosity

Phillies will take a peek at Tim Tebow, mostly out of curiosity

CHICAGO — The Phillies will send a scout to watch Tim Tebow’s baseball showcase next Tuesday in Los Angeles.

Now, before you start clearing a space in your closet for a red-pinstriped Tebow jersey — you know, right next to the midnight green Tebow jersey — keep this in mind: the Phillies, and every other team that stops by Tebow’s workout, are merely practicing due diligence by taking a look at an accomplished athlete who long ago showed some baseball aptitude. Tebow’s chances of ever playing in a major-league game are extremely thin.

The former Heisman Trophy winner and two-time national championship quarterback from the University of Florida has not played baseball since 2005, his junior year in high school. He has been training as a baseball player for several months in Arizona. Next week’s showcase was arranged by Tebow’s representatives. Southern California is loaded with amateur baseball talent so many scouts live there. It makes sense that most teams would have a set of eyes on hand for curiosity if nothing else.

Tebow, who turned 29 earlier this month, was a left-handed hitting outfielder/pitcher in high school. He hit .494 with four homers and 30 RBIs as a junior at Nease High School in Ponte Vedra, Florida, before giving up baseball to focus on football. That was a good move as he enjoyed a storied run at Florida. But Tebow has not been able to stick in the NFL.

Tebow played for the Denver Broncos in 2010 and 2011 and the New York Jets in 2012. He attended training camp with the Eagles in 2015, but failed to make the team. He spent last year working as a broadcaster for ESPN.

Obviously, Tebow’s competitive juices still run hot. His athletic résumé alone will attract scouts to his baseball showcase, which, by the way, will be closed to the public.

Prosecutor says he doesn't believe Jerry Sandusky accuser's claim

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AP

Prosecutor says he doesn't believe Jerry Sandusky accuser's claim

BELLEFONTE, Pa. -- A former Pennsylvania prosecutor testified Tuesday he does not believe a man who reached a settlement with Penn State over a molestation claim is the same person seen by a witness being abused by Jerry Sandusky in a university football team shower.

Joe McGettigan, a former prosecutor who is now a lawyer in private practice, took the stand as the final witness during three days of testimony in Sandusky's bid for dismissal of charges or a new trial.

McGettigan said his opinion about the man who claims to be the person described as Victim 2 in court records is based on changes in the man's story, that he appears too old to be the boy in the shower and that he did not provide certain details to investigators until after the man who witnessed the attack had given his own story in open court.

Sandusky's grounds for appeal include a claim that McGettigan lied when he said during closing argument that Victim 2 was known "to God but not to us."

McGettigan said he did not believe the man's claim to be Victim 2 at the time of Sandusky's 2012 trial.

"I did not then and I do not now," McGettigan said.

Graduate assistant Mike McQueary has testified he saw Sandusky abusing a boy inside a team shower late on a Friday night in early 2001, and reported the matter to then-head coach Joe Paterno and other top administrators.

Sandusky was convicted of 45 counts of abuse of 10 boys after eight of them testified against him -- but not Victim 2.

McGettigan said the man who settled with Penn State was born in 1987, so he would have been about 14 at the time, but McQueary described Victim 2 as being about 10. McGettigan said the man was unable to properly describe the location of the attack and drew a map of a locker room that was not accurate.

The man denied to police in September 2011 that any abuse occurred and gave the same statement to an investigator working for Sandusky's lawyers. But after McQueary testified in a related preliminary hearing, he hired a lawyer and changed his story, claiming to have been sexually abused. Neither the man nor Penn State has disclosed the precise nature of his claim against the university or said how much he was paid to settle it.

McGettigan said Sandusky, who attended all three days of the Post-Conviction Relief Act hearing, "could at any time have told any number of persons" the identity of Victim 2. "He declined to say so."

Another former state prosecutor, Jonelle Eshbach, testified that her office set up a sting after a March 2011 story in The Patriot-News of Harrisburg disclosed details of the grand jury investigation that led to Sandusky's arrest about seven months later.

She and her supervisor, Frank Fina, placed a fake notice within the prosecution agency's file about someone who had been subpoenaed and then watched to see if it would produce a story that would indicate a leak within the attorney general's office. She said no one took the bait.

Fina, the third person to testify Tuesday, said his doubts about the man's claim to be Victim 2 were based in part on early questions about when the McQueary incident occurred. At first, it was publicly reported to be 2002, which the man confirmed. Later it was determined to have been 2001.

"There was a possibility that (he) had conformed his testimony to Mr. McQueary's recollection of the date," Fina said.

Sandusky previously lost direct appeals to the state's Supreme and Superior courts. The current process, presided over by the trial judge, is under the Post-Conviction Relief Act and therefore limited to newly discovered evidence, constitutional violations and ineffective lawyering.

The judge did not say when he would rule but indicated there may be additional proceedings.