A Breakdown Of The Sixers Game One Win

A Breakdown Of The Sixers Game One Win


As you know by now, the Sixers stole one from the Pistons in game one of the seven game series. Haven't caught Sixers fever just yet? No worries, our buddy Goot wrote up a nice quarter-by-quarter breakdown of the game.

1st Quarter
Thaddeus Young got the start and made Mo look good, with an early steal, dunk, and a couple of nice put backs.  Rasheed Wallace heated up and scored 8 of the Piston's first 12 points.  The Sixers shooting went cold and they didn't hit a shot in the last 4:28 of the quarter allowing the Pistons to take a 27-22 lead after 1.

2nd Quarter
The Sixers playoff inexperience showed in the 2nd quarter, they had too many turnovers, poor shot selection, and the Pistons owned the glass.  After a 'Sheed 3 to put the Pistons up 11, Mo realized he need Reggie Evans and Dalembert in to defend against 'Sheed and bench player Jason Maxiell(who ended with 10pts and 9reb. at the half).  The refs wanted to make sure 'Sheeds stat line was full and T'ed him up for arguing a foul called against Prince.  The Sixers entered the locker room down 13, 31-58.

3rd Quarter
The Sixers were determined to make this a game and came out hot, going
on an 8-0 run to start the half.  After a Pistons' timeout, they
answered with a 9-0 run of their own.  After trading a few shots, the
Sixers went on another 10-0 run and eventually ended the quarter down
70-63.

4th Quarter
Andre Miller came out like a man possessed and stole the ball from
Hamilton and hit a layup to set the tone.  Miller went on to score 12
of his 20 points in the first 6 minutes of the quarter and the Sixers
took their first lead since the 1st, 78-77.  Reggie Evans hit a
turnaround at the top of circle as the shot clock expired to keep the
Sixers ahead.  92% free throw shooter Chancey Billups missed 3 of 4
foul shots and Lou Williams hit a 19-footer, and the Sixers held a
84-80 lead with 2 minutes to play. The Sixers came out of a timeout and
Iguodala booted the ball driving to the net, the Pistons scored on
their next possession down the floor to pull within 2.  Andre Miller
missed a running jumper and Reggie Evans was there to tip in to put the
Sixers up 86-82.  'Sheed takes off his headband to show he means
business and draws a foul at the other end and knocks down his foul
shots.  Iguodala got fouled, made his first, missed his second, and
Maxiell got called for a lane violation, but Iguodala missed again.
Billups regained his form and sunk 2 foul shots to pull within 1.  The
Sixers got the ball out of a timeout and Iguodala made a pass to Sammy,
who then got called for an offensive foul (personally, I think it was a
bad call;  Maxiell got to the spot after Sammy was already in the
air).  With 26 seconds left on the clock, the Sixers were up 1 and the
Pistons had the ball.  The Sixers defense clamped down, Tayshaun Prince
missed a 19 footer, and Iguodala collected the rebound and got fouled
at 11 seconds.  With Iguodala at the line, he missed his first...
NOOoooo.. but hit his second to put the Sixers up 2.  Pistons took
their last timeout.  Right before play was about to start, 'Sheed leans
in on the Sixers huddle. He had a smile on his face, but that's messed
up... you don't pull that crap in the playoffs.  The Pistons run their
play and it's to 'Sheed, Karma pays him back and he misses it .
Iguodala secures the rebound, gets fouled, and thankfully makes both
shots to end the game.

Notes
If the Sixers are going to stay in this series, Reggie Evans (11-14)
needs remain a factor down low, Rasheed Wallace (24-9, 7 blocks) and
Maxiell (11-12, 6 off) were eating them up in the second quarter.  The
Sixers really stepped up the defense in the second half, when they held
to Pistons to 35 points on top of 39% shooting for the game.  Andre
Miller took the game over to begin the 4th and was the primary reason
the Sixers pulled out a win.  The Sixers need to make their free
throws, and they were lucky to win after shooting 19 of 27 at the line.
It's not often Chauncey Billups is going to miss 3 free throws in the
4th quarter.  Game 2 is set Wednesday night 7:30pm.

-Goot

(Inquirer Image)

Sixers' game vs. Kings rescheduled for Jan. 30

Sixers' game vs. Kings rescheduled for Jan. 30

The NBA has determined a new date for the Sixers home game against the Kings, which was postponed on Nov. 30 because of unsafe playing conditions on the court.

The game has been rescheduled for Monday, Jan. 30 at 6 p.m. This will create back-to-backs for both teams.

The Sixers are playing in Chicago on Jan. 29. They will play consecutive games against the Bulls and Kings, then have a road back-to-back against the Mavericks and Spurs on Feb. 1 and 2.

The Kings will be on what is now an eight-game road trip. They will play a back-to-back against the Rockets the next night in Houston.

Former Flyers coach Bill Dineen dies at 84

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The Associated Press

Former Flyers coach Bill Dineen dies at 84

Bill Dineen, who had the distinction of being Eric Lindros’ first NHL coach, died early Saturday morning at his home in Lake George, New York. He was 84.
 
“Such a wonderful person, who got along with everybody,” Flyers president Paul Holmgren said. “I never played for him, but worked with him in scouting. Just a great guy.” 
 
Dineen succeeded Holmgren as head coach during the 1991-92 season.
 
“When I got fired, a lot of our guys were squeezing their sticks,” Holmgren said. “They were tight. It shouldn’t be hard to play the game. When things got tough, they were a little under stress, Billy coming in, he loosened things up.”
 
Dineen coached parts of two seasons here from 1991-92 through the 1992-93 season, which was Lindros’ first year as a Flyer.
 
“Bill treated everyone with the utmost respect,” Holmgren said. “He was the perfect guy for Eric coming in here. That respect goes both ways. He was almost a grandfatherly figure for Eric at the time.”

Dineen served as a scout with the organization from 1990-91 until succeeding Holmgren as coach. He then returned to a scouting role in 1993-94 and remained with the Flyers as a scout through 1996-97.
 
Mark Howe, one of the greatest Flyers defensemen of all-time, played for Dineen as an 18-year-old rookie in the WHA with the Houston Aeros (1973-74), and also had him during his final year as a Flyer in 1991-92.
 
“He was one of the best people I ever met in the game of hockey,” Howe said. “He was a real players coach. Of all the guys I ever played for. Maybe a little Paul Holmgren, too. 
 
“If you lost the game, he was one of the very few people if you went for a bite to eat or a beer after the game you lost, you actually felt poorly for letting the coach down.”
 
Howe said Dineen’s teams weren’t all about skill.
 
“He picked people that were about ‘the team,'” Howe said. “He made me earn my spot that first year in Houston.”
 
Dineen posted a 60-60-20 record with the Flyers. His son, Kevin, played on both of those teams before assuming the captaincy from Rick Tocchet in 1993-94. 
 
A gentleman behind the bench, Bill Dineen was much the same person as a player. A former right wing who spent the majority of his six-year playing career with the Detroit Red Wings, he had just 122 penalty minutes in 322 games, scoring 51 goals and 95 points.
 
“I knew Billy for a long time," Flyers senior vice president Bob Clarke said. "He was a player and coach at the minor league level and the NHL level, but I think more importantly he was a really, really good hockey person and really good person.” 

Dineen won two WHA titles coaching the Aeros and two Stanley Cups as a player with the Red Wings. A member of the AHL Hall of Fame, Dineen also coached the Adirondack Red Wings from 1983 through 1988-89.
 
Three of his five sons — Gordon, Peter and Kevin — played in the NHL. Sons Shawn and Jerry had their roots in the AHL. 
 
“His boys are scattered all over the map,” Holmgren said. “Just a tremendous hockey family.”
 
Dineen is part of Flyer folklore trivia. He, along with Keith Allen and Vic Stasiuk, were all Red Wings teammates during 1953-53. They also shared something else in common: all three later  became Flyers head coaches.