Clap Your Hands Say Yeah in the Basement of the First Unitarian Church

Clap Your Hands Say Yeah in the Basement of the First Unitarian Church

I just spent 20 f@#@ing minutes typing up a nice little review I was rather happy with and then I hit some stupid godamn link and it all got deleted.  I want to break shit.  Anyway, here is my half assed second attempt:

What the hell is the title of my post?  Clap Your Hands Say Yeah is a band.  Rock and Roll and shit.  The basement of the First Unitarian Church is, well, the basement of a church on 21st and Chestnut.  It was an absolutely horrible venue to see a show.  Perhaps the worst venue/setup I have ever been to.  It was about 120 degrees, no ventilation, sweaty people, etc.  My bro seems to think the Wetlands was hotter, but I disagreed.

So CYHSY is a pretty hyped up indie band.  They got a stellar review from Pitchfork back in June and their Internet buzz started off from there.  I think I first heard about them on Stereogum.  You can download some free mp3s from their website.  Their CD is rather great, I've probably listened to it 40-50 times over the last month or so.  I read it described somewhere as perfect for playing really loud while driving in your car.. that is exactly how I've listened to it.

The venue was hot as shit and rather packed for Clap Your Hands.  They opened up with my favorite track off of their self titled CD, Let the Cool Goddess Rust Away.  They are definitely a lot less polished live and the opening bass didn't have the same effect.  A nice opener none the less.  The crowd was rather odd, no one was really dancing, but the biggest crowd pleaser was The Skin of My Yellow Country Teeth.  The crowd reacted rather well to this one.  I enjoyed Details of the War (I am always a fan of a nice harmonica) and the song they closed with Upon this Tidal Wave of Young Blood.  I think they played 2 songs which weren't on the album.  One of which sounded like "Satan" in which they tried to get some crowd participation to no avail.  They almost had the place rocking at a few points, but I think the heat was oppressive.  For such a small venue, I couldn't really see much of anything unfortunately.

Lead singer Alec Ounsworth constantly gets David Byrne comparisons and it is easy to hear.  He sounds a lot less polished live and a bit harsher than on the album.  I don't think this is bad, just a different feeling.  If you think his lyrics are hard to understand on the album, good luck trying to decipher them live.  I would like to check these guys out again, but in a much nicer venue.

Clap Your Hands was actually opening up for Magnolia Electric Company which I only stayed for about three songs.  I do have a job which requires me to be up at the crack of dawn, believe it or not.  There was also a band two guys called Grand Buffet who were rather hilarious.  I have no idea how to describe them so I'll tell you what r5productions has to say:

A swashbuckling hip hop mess-up from Pittsburgh's goofball Ritalin kings. Heavily styled in the vein of immature-era Beastie Boys, with shit-eating moog beats and catchy, nerve-rattling vocals. An audio carwreck you can't turn away from.

No. 24 Penn State at Purdue: Nittany Lions seek first road win

No. 24 Penn State at Purdue: Nittany Lions seek first road win

Penn State (5-2, 3-1) vs. Purdue (3-4, 1-3)
Ross-Ade Stadium, West Lafayette, Ind.
Saturday, noon, ABC/ESPN2

Scouting Penn State
The Lions (5-2) upended the Buckeyes, 24-21, when safety Marcus Allen blocked a field goal and cornerback Grant Haley returned it 60 yards for a touchdown with 4:27 left in the game. The Lions, who rallied from a 21-7 deficit after three quarters, earned their third straight victory.

Allen and Haley were named Big Ten co-Special Teams Players of the week, and linebacker Brandon Bell, who had a career-high 19 tackles in the game, earned the conference’s Defensive Player of the Week honor.

Running back Saquon Barkley has rushed for 681 yards, fifth-most in the Big Ten, and is tied for the conference lead in touchdowns with nine.

Scouting Purdue
Purdue (3-4) fell to Nebraska last week in the debut of Boilermakers interim coach Gerad Parker, who replaced the fired Darrell Hazell on Oct. 16. Quarterback David Blough leads the Big Ten in passing yardage (2,065) and total offense (300.7 yards per game), and has thrown 14 touchdown passes (albeit with 11 interceptions).

The Boilermakers are, however, last in the Big Ten in rushing offense (120.3), total defense (441.0), turnover margin (minus-8) and red-zone offense (15-for-23, 11 touchdowns) and next-to-last in rushing defense (249.0) and passing efficiency.

The Lions lead 13-3-1 and have won the last seven meetings, the most recent a 45-21 victory in 2013.

Storyline to watch
This is the ultimate trap game for PSU, and the Lions’ approach to it will say a lot about their leadership and maturity. They have also dropped their last four road games dating back to last season, including both this fall. Their last victory away from home came last Oct. 24, against Maryland in Baltimore.

What’s at stake
The Lions can become bowl-eligible with a victory.

Penn State 35, Purdue 21

Embiid and Okafor want to play together, but not just yet, says Brown

Embiid and Okafor want to play together, but not just yet, says Brown

CAMDEN, N.J. — If all goes as planned, a time will come when the Sixers can roll out a dominating frontcourt duo with Joel Embiid and Jahlil Okafor sharing the court in lengthy stretches.

That moment has to wait, though, as both Embiid and Okafor are on minute restrictions. As he returns from a knee injury, Okafor currently is coming off the bench and backing up Embiid.

“This conversation with Jahlil and Joel is more intelligent and applicable at a later date,” Brett Brown said at practice Friday. “When Jahlil’s minutes start going up and Joel can, then it’s a real conversation. I do think you may see them sooner than even I thought together. But as far as making it a real constant part of a strategy or rotation, it’s beyond too early days.”

In an ideal world, Brown could pair the two bigs now and use all of their allotted minutes (Embiid 20, Okafor 14) at once. That would leave an extensive workload on second-year bench player Richaun Holmes.

“This is a hot topic,” Brown said. “I will say it one more time: If I play Jahlil and Jo together, I hope Richaun can play 35 minutes.”

It’s an unrealistic expectation for Holmes, who averaged 13.8 minutes in 51 games last season. Brown caps the majority of the Sixers at six-minute segments to keep them competing at a high energy level.

“Right now, he’s a backup,” Brown said of Holmes. “I think he’s going to be an NBA player for a very long time. I just feel like in the role, he’s a second-year player that didn’t really have much of a role last year. He’s shown everybody that he’s for real. He really can play a role. At this early stage, that is the key word.”

Embiid and Okafor have been envisioning competing together since Okafor was drafted two years ago. They became friends long before they were NBA players and have an easy chemistry on the court as a result.

“I think it’s going to be exciting,” Embiid said. “We played a little bit together today in practice. We’re figuring out how to play with each other. It’s a process and we’ve got trust it.”

Yes, the players know they have to wait, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy for them to resist an opportunity to play with one another.  

“I think once we figure it out, we can really dominate together,” Okafor said. “We were able to flirt with it again today. We accidentally keep ending up on the same team even though Coach keeps telling us to make sure we alternate. But we’re having fun. We’re trying to put some pressure on it because we want to play together.”

Is that accidentally with air quotes?

“Yeah, exactly,” Okafor said with a laugh.