Gregg Henson Out at 950 WPEN

Gregg Henson Out at 950 WPEN

If Gregg Henson leaves WPEN 950's morning show and nobody is listening, does it make a sound?

Well, apparently he is no longer on the show and has left for greener.. er.. Detroit.

A reader tipped us off to Henson's blog in which he notes:

This morning I left my position at Sports Radio 950 in
Philadelphia.  Nicole and I have decided to return to Detroit to
operate our own business.  Greater Media in Philadelphia is a
phenomenal company and it is very sad to leave the great people at
WPEN.  They have been nothing but great as I mulled my decision to
return home.

Temple football players not shying away from rising expectations

Temple football players not shying away from rising expectations

After a grueling preseason practice in the summer heat last Tuesday, Temple football players, their gear drenched with sweat, gathered at the Temple logo at midfield at Chodoff Field on campus and took a knee on the turf to listen to a familiar voice.

But it wasn’t that of head coach Matt Rhule or any other member of the Owls’ coaching staff.

It was the voice of former Eagles and Super Bowl-winning coach Dick Vermeil, whose message was simple yet effective: “Hard work is not a punishment.”

That’s a motto the Owls have to live by this season if they want to live up to the lofty goal they’ve collectively set for themselves.

As senior linebacker and defensive leader Avery Williams explained, the 2016 Owls are determined to be “the greatest Temple team ever.” The motivation and conviction for that goal comes from the nightmarish ending to last year’s dream season.

“Man, we ended the season with a losing record,” Williams said of last December’s losses to Houston in the AAC title game and Toledo in the Boca Raton Bowl. “We lost those two games. That’s not good at all around here.

"We want to be the greatest Temple team ever, every year. When I leave, I want those dudes to focus on being the greatest Temple team that year. Nobody’s complacent around here. We want to get better each year and just keep getting better.”

It’s one thing to say you want to be the greatest at anything. It’s another animal to go out there and actually do it.

By now, most know the tale of Temple’s 10-3 campaign in 2015, which included landmark moments such as the first win over Penn State since 1941, the classic primetime showdown with Notre Dame and the first-ever AAC Eastern Division title, among other things.

Needless to say, topping those achievements will be a hefty task for a team that needs to replace plenty on the defensive side of the ball with three leaders who’ve moved on to the NFL.

But Rhule’s message to his team coming into camp was to forget all about last season because, as far as he wants his team to be concerned, last season is over and is just a figment of imagination.

And with just a few days left until Friday’s 2016 opener against Army at The Linc, it seems Rhule’s edict has gotten through to his players.

“Yeah, there is pressure, but that’s what athletes live for. They live for the pressure of being that same team or being better than last year’s team,” said senior quarterback Phillip Walker, who's coming off a record-breaking season in 2015 and remains one of the Owls’ key components. He’s looking to become the first quarterback in program history to lead the Owls to back-to-back bowl games.

“[This season] is an opportunity for us for to be great this year again and we’re looking forward to it," Walker said. "I think we have a great team that’s willing to go out there and put everything on the line each week just to have success at the end of the season.”

“We have a motto around here saying we want to be 1-0 every week,” said senior running back Jahad Thomas, who’s part of a deep and talented backfield. “We want to be undefeated once it’s all said and done and that’s the goal here. … What comes with that is great execution. We all gotta be in sync — offense, defense and special teams.”

The fact of the matter is that, after last season’s new heights of success, expectations for Temple’s program have risen. And, in all likelihood, they’ll continue to rise.

Williams feels the key to dealing with those rising expectations is not worrying about them and focusing only on what the players themselves can control.

“If the hat’s on your head, you’ve got to produce,” said Williams, a Baltimore native who amassed 49 tackles and an interception last season.

“We never pay attention to the opponent, it’s all how can we get ourselves better and what are we doing wrong? In life, you never getting beaten by another person, you’re really beating yourself. You messed up. If you’re not working as hard as you can in school, it’s your fault. It’s not the teacher’s fault for making the test. You never look at the opponent, you always look at yourself and see how you can get better.

“We don’t pay attention to nobody else but ourselves. We always look interior, never exterior. When you start looking on the outside world, then you’ll start letting the outside world affect you. So you have to look at what’s wrong with you and what’s great with you and how to perfect it.”

To achieve their goal this season, the Owls know they’ll likely have to go through Houston, the defending conference champion and heavy AAC favorite entering this season. No. 15 in the AP preseason poll, the Cougars demolished Florida State in last year’s Peach Bowl after vanquishing Temple in the AAC title game.

Houston (West) and Temple (East) will not meet during the regular season as both are in different divisions of the AAC. The two teams can only meet this season in a conference title game rematch.

The Cougars are on the minds of the Owls as the season gets ready to begin, but the Owls know there’s work to do first before any shot at Houston becomes a realistic option.

“We haven’t beaten Houston since I got here, so I really want to get after them,” said Williams, one of the Owls' most-trusted voices on defense. “But in order to beat Houston, we’ve got to go through all 12 games on our schedule. So we have to take it one day at time.”

It all begins again Friday night.

Best of MLB: Mets win in 10th on Yoenis Cespedes' walk-off HR

Best of MLB: Mets win in 10th on Yoenis Cespedes' walk-off HR

NEW YORK -- Yoenis Cespedes homered with two outs in the bottom of the 10th inning to give the New York Mets a 2-1 victory over the Miami Marlins in the first game of a pivotal series between National League playoff contenders Monday night.

Jose Reyes dashed home to score the tying run in the eighth on a dangerous collision at the plate, and the Mets pulled even with Miami for second place in the NL East. With its seventh victory in nine games, New York remained 2 1/2 games behind St. Louis for the league's second wild card.

It was an exhilarating win for the Mets, who appeared to be at a major disadvantage on the mound in the opener of a four-game set. New York was shut out for six innings by Marlins ace Jose Fernandez, but Mets starter Rafael Montero also put up zeros in his first major league start since April 2015 (see full recap).

Martinez's 13 K's, throwing error give Cards win
MILWAUKEE -- Stephen Piscotty scored on a throwing error in the ninth inning after Carlos Martinez struck out a career-high 13, leading the St. Louis Cardinals over the Milwaukee Brewers 6-5 on Monday night.

With two on and nobody out in the ninth, Yadier Molina dropped down a bunt. Reliever Tyler Thornburg (5-5) threw to third base for a force out, but Jonathan Villar's throw to first was wild, allowing Piscotty to score.

After Martinez held Milwaukee to one run over six innings, the Brewers scored four runs in the seventh to take a 5-3 lead. St. Louis tied it in the eighth on a two-run homer by Randal Grichuk off Corey Knebel.

Seung Hwan Oh pitched a perfect ninth for his 14th save. Miguel Socolovich (1-0) pitched 1 2/3 scoreless innings to pick up his first win.

Jedd Gyorko and Kolten Wong each hit solo home runs for the Cardinals (see full recap).

Royals keep rolling, take down Yankees
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Dillon Gee kept the Royals' momentum going with six sharp innings, Alcides Escobar hit a three-run homer and Kansas City beat the New York Yankees 8-5 on Monday night to open their three-game set.

Gee (6-7) allowed only four hits and a run in the latest impressive start by the Royals' staff, helping the reigning World Series champions win for the 18th time in 22 games.

Lorenzo Cain, Kendrys Morales and Alex Gordon drove in runs off Michael Pineda (6-11) during a five-hit salvo in the first inning. Pineda then retired 15 straight before getting into a two-on, no-outs jam in the seventh that led to Escobar's homer off reliever Blake Parker.

Starlin Castro drove in two runs for the Yankees, the second in a four-run eighth inning that forced Kansas City manager Ned Yost to summon fill-in closer Kelvin Herrera (see full recap).

Jake Thompson tweaks delivery, offers ray of light on a dark night for Phillies

Jake Thompson tweaks delivery, offers ray of light on a dark night for Phillies

BOX SCORE

On the surface, this was not a very positive night at the ballpark for the Phillies. They had just four hits and lost, 4-0, to the Washington Nationals in front of the smallest crowd of the season – 16,056, announced – at Citizens Bank Park (see Instant Replay).
 
But lest we forget, this is a rebuilding season and in a rebuilding season the final score isn’t always paramount. So on an otherwise dark Monday night there was a ray of light for the Phillies.
 
Jake Thompson had the kind of start those who traded for him a year ago and those who watched him pitch this season in Triple A said he was capable of having.
 
“It was great to see,” manager Pete Mackanin said. “That’s just what he needed. He needed a real positive outing. I think this will do wonders for him down the road.”
 
Thompson held the NL East-leading Nationals to two runs over seven innings, his longest of five outings in the majors.
 
“He looked like the pitcher that was advertised,” Mackanin said.
 
Thompson’s first four outings in the majors were poor. He was tagged for 22 hits and 21 earned runs in 19 1/3 innings. He walked 13 and struck out 13. Those results were starkly different than his last 11 starts in Triple A. He went 8-0 in those 11 starts and recorded a 1.21 ERA while allowing just 10 earned runs in 74 1/3 innings. He gave up just 52 hits and 18 walks over that span while striking out 42.
 
After watching Thompson for four starts, pitching coach Bob McClure decided to suggest some delivery changes to the 22-year-old right-hander.
 
Players are often receptive to making adjustments when they are struggling. Thompson incorporated the changes McClure suggested and found success Monday night.
 
“We just tried to simplify his delivery so he could make better quality pitches,” McClure said.
 
In his old delivery, Thompson started off facing home plate. He pulled his arms over his head, turned and lifted his front leg before delivering the ball. McClure eliminated many of the moving parts. No more lifting the arms above the head. No more body turn. Thompson started his delivery with his body already turned, like a modified stretch. He simply lifted his leg, let his body go down the slope and fired. The new delivery slowed everything down for him. He looked poised, especially after the first couple of innings, and started attacking hitters with first-pitch strikes like a confident pitcher does.
 
Considering he only worked on the new delivery in two short bullpen sessions Saturday and Sunday in New York, Thompson was a pretty quick study.
 
“It was huge,” he said of the new delivery. “Just on the physical side of things, I’m in a better position to make pitches. I took away some moving parts to make it easier on myself.”
 
Thompson allowed seven hits, walked one and struck out three. All three strikeouts came in his final inning of work. He struck out leadoff man Trea Turner with two men on base with a slider to end the inning.
 
That’s another adjustment McClure made. He had Thompson stop throwing his curveball and focus on his fastball, slider, cutter and changeup.
 
Both of the runs that Thompson allowed came in the first inning on a solo homer by Jayson Werth and an RBI single by Anthony Rendon. After that, Thompson recorded six straight shutout innings. His teammates didn’t support him offensively. Washington right-hander Tanner Roark pitched seven shutout innings. He is 3-0 and has allowed just two runs in 28 innings in four starts against the Phils this season.
 
Thompson needed a start like this for a couple of reasons. First, if he had been pounded again, Phillies officials might have had to consider taking him out of the rotation just so his confidence didn’t get ruined.
 
And second, with Aaron Nola and Zach Eflin out with injuries, the team needed to know something was going right for one of the young pitchers being groomed for the future. Vince Velasquez, another young arm, had three poor outings before pitching well in New York on Sunday.
 
“This will help his confidence a lot,” McClure said.
 
McClure then offered a little glimpse into Thompson’s competitive character.
 
“He seemed pissed that he wasn't pitching well,” McClure said. “But he wasn't deflated. We felt like we should keep starting him because he didn't seem beaten. He seems like a tough kid mentally. We felt like once he started making better quality pitches, he'd get better results.”
 
It happened Monday, a ray of light on an otherwise dark night.