Guest Post: An Open Letter to SI and Tom Verducci

Guest Post: An Open Letter to SI and Tom Verducci

A lot of folks in Philly are less than thrilled with Sports Illustrated's decision to not give the Phillies' first World Series win in 28 years its own cover. Nationally, the win was but a post-it on a picture of upright citizen Albert Haynesworth. In the mid-Atlantic region, the prominences were reversed, but a text box sullies the great picture of our moment of moments. In the following letter to SI and Tom Verducci, who penned the cover-crowding letter to Bug Selig, Dan Roche sums what a lot of Philadelphians are feeling.


I am writing to you as a life-long fan of both the Phillies and your
magazine. Having experienced plenty of disappointment by the former,
the latest dose from your publication was no less severe.

The city of Philadelphia waited a quarter-century between major sports
championships. And for this reader, the anticipation of seeing how the
event would be immortalized by the photographers and wordsmiths at SI
is just as integral as the celebration in the streets on the night of
the clinching game and the subsequent parade that followed.

The last -- and only -- time the Phillies conquered Baseball's Mount
Olympus, back in 1980, they were passed over for the cover of the
subsequent SI issue by marathoner Alberto Salazar (take a second to
think about that). When I received the latest issue in the mail, I
hoped for retribution. I began at the photo of an enraptured Brad Lidge
and Carlos Ruiz, and making my way down the cover (which I imagined
framing in my unborn child's room), saw that the picture had been
sullied by a box filled with the beginning of a letter from columnist
Tom Verducci to MLB Commissioner Bud Selig. (I now know by skimming
your website that the national cover went not to the Phillies, but to
Albert Haynesworth, who, at last check, hasn't won anything besides a
5-game suspension for stomping a helmetless foe 2 seasons ago.)


I immediately opened to the article, which only intensified my
apoplexy. Verducci mentions the Phillies only tangentially to make his
points to improve the World Series to make it more fan-friendly. Well,
sir, I am a fan, and friendly is not what I'm feeling right now.

Verducci manages to step off the soapbox long enough to give back story
on Charlie Manuel's journey through hardship. During this portion of
the article (paragraph 23), we stumble over the fact that yes, the
Phillies won the 2008 World Series. And only after the end of the 30th
paragraph (of 32) does Verducci stop to mention any of the players by
name. Maybe space-filler?

I've never written a letter like this to voice my displeasure. I
certainly hope Mr. Verducci got Commissioner Selig's attention with
this article, and elicited a response that is within a toll call of the
feelings I'm experiencing right now.

This article is self-serving, aimless drivel. And if folks weren't
interested in watching the World Series, as you imply, they certainly
wouldn't have wasted any time side-stepping the photos that bracketed
your pointless ramblings.

At the risk of prolonging a stereotype, Verducci, boo.

Note: SI also released a Commemorative Edition. Perhaps with the regular issue covers, they hoped to sell more of that? We're a little puzzled by the decision, with an obvious bias.

Top Phillies prospect Mickey Moniak adds muscle, looks for big season 2017

Top Phillies prospect Mickey Moniak adds muscle, looks for big season 2017

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. – The difference was striking.
 
When Mickey Moniak arrived in Philadelphia to sign his first professional contract six months ago, he was rail-thin and 170 pounds.
 
On Tuesday night, Moniak made a quick visit to the winter meetings to be honored as Baseball America’s high school player of the year for 2016. 
 
He’d added 20 pounds to his 6-foot-2 frame.
 
“It’s all muscle,” Moniak said proudly.
 
The Phillies selected Moniak with the first pick in the June draft and signed him for $6.1 million. Just a few months of professional baseball convinced the 18-year-old centerfielder that he needed to get stronger. He recently capped off his first year of pro ball with a three-week stint at the Phillies’ strength and conditioning camp in Clearwater.
 
“It’s something the Phillies wanted me to do and I knew I definitely needed it, too,” Moniak said. “I really enjoyed my first year. I got a taste of what it was like to play baseball for a job and it was a good time.
 
“There were a lot of positives that came out of the first year. I felt like I jumped in there and really competed. I hit well in July. In August, I started to fatigue and I wasn’t prepared for that, being my first season. But it was a good learning experience. I needed to get stronger.”
 
Moniak hit .284 with a .340 on-base percentage, 11 doubles, four triples, a homer and 28 RBIs in 46 games for the Phillies’ prospect-stacked Gulf Coast League team. That club, loaded with young Latin players and first-year talent from the 2016 draft, went 41-17 and advanced to the finals of the league playoffs before losing to the Cardinals.
 
After the playoffs, many of the players from that club participated in the Florida instructional league. Moniak played sparingly, however, after dealing with some soreness in his right hip. He was checked out by doctors in Philadelphia and there are no more concerns.
 
“It was just tightness,” Moniak said. “Everything is good. I’m 100 percent. They said it was either a growing pain or just tightness. I just have to stretch more.”
 
Moniak is an athletic centerfielder with speed and a good left-side bat. He has been compared favorably to former All-Star Steve Finley.
 
"Collectively, we believe Mickey was the best player available in the draft," Johnny Almaraz, the Phillies head of amateur scouting, said on draft night in June. "He's a true centerfielder with incredible offensive ability and the potential to be a perennial All-Star."

Moniak hit .476 with seven homers, 12 triples and four doubles at La Costa Canyon High School in Carlsbad, California, during his senior season. He impressed a rival scout who saw him play five times during the season.

“The bat is good,” the scout said. “He’s going to hit and hit for average. He’s a good centerfielder. He can run. The question is how many home runs will he hit? If he ends up getting stronger, he could be a corner bat that’s unbelievable. There’s no negative here. It’s a good pick.”
 
Now, Moniak is stronger. He looked sturdy in a dress shirt and tie at the winter meetings Tuesday night. He is eager to see how it all translates on the field in 2017.
 
“I’m excited for the season,” he said. “I’m just going to go to spring training and compete and hopefully end up in (Single A) Lakewood, stay healthy and hopefully have a winning season and win a championship. That’s the ultimate goal and if personal stats come with that, too, that’s great.”

Eagles Injury Update: Eagles get top running back, receiver back at practice

Eagles Injury Update: Eagles get top running back, receiver back at practice

The Eagles will get a boost on Wednesday as they begin to prepare for Washington and a chance to snap a three-game losing streak. 

Their top running back and receiver – Ryan Mathews (knee) and Jordan Matthews (ankle) – will both practice. 

Ryan Mathews, who suffered an MCL sprain against Seattle, has missed the last two weeks. Jordan Matthews, who hurt his ankle against the Packers, missed the Bengals game. It was the first game he had ever missed in his collegiate and NFL career. 

“He’s good to play,” head coach Doug Pederson said about Ryan Mathews. “We’ll find out today, but he’s cleared and ready to go.”

In the two weeks without Mathews in the lineup, the Eagles had their two worst rushing performances of the season: 81 yards against the Packers and 53 against the Bengals. 

Obviously, getting behind in those games skewed those numbers plenty. But it should still be a boost to get Mathews back. 

“We fell behind so it gets us out of that mode a little bit,” Pederson said. “But I like where we’re at. I do lean on that offensive line quit a bit. I do talk to them during the week and say hey this might be the week that we need to rush the ball 30-35 times and they’re up for the challenge, obviously. 

“With the addition of Ryan coming back, it gives us depth and a bigger [running back] back there and hopefully we can get back to running the ball like we did a few weeks ago.” 

With Jordan Matthews out against Cincinnati, undrafted rookie Paul Turner made the most of his opportunity. He caught six passes for 80 yards, while playing in the slot. 

Pederson said that even with Jordan Matthews’ returning, the Eagles will still try to find ways to keep Turner involved. 

The team will practice indoors on Wednesday because the fields at the NovaCare Complex are too saturated thanks to Tuesday's constant rain.