In Homer We Trust... How 'bout You?

In Homer We Trust... How 'bout You?


NHL general managers, scouts, and media are gathering in LA ahead of tonight's entry draft, and so far, there's little in the way of actual news to report. Don't expect that to be the case for long though, and the Flyers will likely be one of the teams most mentioned in discussions. When aren't they?

Without a pick until #89, which falls late in the third round, the Flyers could still look to move up and add a prospect to their system, which has seen its two biggest stars (JVR and Giroux) join the big club already. Or they could land a goalie, as many stories have cited as their primary goal this weekend. Last year, the big news of the draft was the blockbuster deal that brought Chris Pronger to Philly in exchange for a sizable package of draft picks and players. That move obviously paid dividends, but the cost will now be more clear. 

How will Paul Holmgren fare in a draft weekend during which he possesses no high picks as trade chips while being hamstrung by the salary cap and the agreements he already has in place? 

There's a lot of work to be done before next season, and several key questions need to be answered somewhat soon to continue the domino effect that NHL moves require in the current era. Each deal impacts the next in a salary-capped league, and signing or trading one player often means others will have to go, sometimes for what seems like not-enough-in-return. 

Cap-strapped and bereft of picks, some will criticize Holmgren. It happens to most GMs in any sport, because as fans, we pretty much want it all. Holmgren is berated for having his team up against the cap, while the Eagles catch hell if they're anything but right up against it. I've been lovingly picked apart here as being a homer for Homer, and I understand why. There are a few contracts on the dockets that are overinflated and/or compounded by no-movement clauses for players, and raise your hand if you were alive for the last Flyers parade. We want a winner, and until one is delivered, everyone is open to criticism.

But I still think Homer deserves a lot of credit for the Flyers making it to the Finals and little blame for their falling short and also their dud of a regular season. The fact that they made it that far in the playoffs showed me that the team as he'd created it was good enough to be one of the top seeds in the East. They had the talent and leadership to get within two games of hoisting the Cup. The players just didn't execute in the regular season, and Homer can't very well get out there on the ice and show them how. 

Stevens and Lavvy
Homer made the tough decision to fire the team's head coach, a guy who'd been part of the organization for the some of their greatest achievements in the AHL, then led a historic turnaround when handed a dead-last place team. Peter Laviolette may not have improved upon the Flyers' record under John Stevens, but no one will evaluate Lavvy's impact in terms of regular season wins and losses alone. I don't recall ever seeing a head coach do more to get his players a W, and they thrived in the playoffs under his direction. 

Their conditioning was garbage when he got here. Lavvy made that clear after the season. Imagine what they could be if they enter the season in great shape and have a full campaign of his rigorous practices heading into next season's playoffs. John Stevens was the right man for the job when he was hired, but Homer knew that changes within the team meant that a change was needed behind the bench as well, even though very few people were blaming Stevens for the losses on the ice. Then Homer picked exactly the type of coach the Flyers needed during their "headless chicken" stage last season, and I don't think anyone can question that decision. 

Goalies
But what about the team that was on the ice? You can't be GM in this town without drawing fire for your inability to put a true #1 goalie into an orange and black mask. Homer rolled the low-stakes dice by banking on Ray Emery in net. Emery was in exile due to behavior issues, so Homer got him on the cheap and for a short-term deal. Brian Boucher was brought back amidst clamorous criticism to be the backup. 

But neither was inked to be the future. The elusive true #1 wasn't available last season, and let's be real here for a second—when are these guys available? Once a team identifies a stud in net, that's it. More often that not, he's locked up and never allowed to leave until he's old and too expensive. Teams chase the dream of a goalie that can carry them no matter what, and most of their gambles fall flat. The goalies that fans have wanted Homer to acquire in past seasons have mostly shat the bed wherever they did end up, supplanted by a guy like Michael Leighton anyway. Goalies are inconsistent and impossible to predict. Across the state, you see a guy like Marc-Andre Fleury be a vital part of a Cup winner one season, then allow more than two goals in 9 of 13 playoff games the next. 

Knowing how hard it is to even identify a true #1, much less acquire one, Homer built last season's Flyers to win without that luxury. Obviously, they weren't built strongly enough to win it all without a better goalie than they had. We saw that as Patrick Kane's pad-tester dribbled through Leighton and the Cup was brought onto our ice. But they were damn close to being good enough to win almost regardless of who was in net. Ray Emery the misfit... Brian Boucher the has-been/never-was... and Michael Leighton the guy who has been waived five friggin' times, including once by the Flyers. 

It was a testament to the guys in pads last year, the guys on the ice, and to their GM that they could make it to the Cup Finals despite an unprecedented run of back luck in goalie injuries—even in the playoffs. Still, Homer knows that with better goaltending, the team could be amazing, and he's hunting for his #1 despite what the team achieved without one last season.

The Bad Contracts
Two names come up more than any others when Holmgren is being flogged for his bad contracts—Scott Hartnell and Danny Briere. Hartnell had a terrible season plagued by some off-ice issue no one is really talking about, and every bad penalty the took reminded fans that he had a no-movement clause in his contract. Briere has one too, and he makes a ton of money to boot. But here's why I don't get too down on Homer for those two contracts, the flaws of which were evident the day they were signed. The Homer Haters will have a field day on me, but honestly I just think it takes time for an exec and a franchise to get used to the implications of something so paradigm-altering as a salary cap being added to their league. 

Imagine doing your job in a certain environment for years, one in which you have more money at your disposal to solve problems in your production than your competitors do. Then all of a sudden a government ruling gives everyone the same spending ceiling, which takes away one of your company's biggest advantages—its willingness to fix mistakes by spending more money. That's kind of how I think it went for the Flyers when the cap was put in place for the '05-'06 season. These guys are hockey guys. They aren't mathematicians. The NHL hasn't yet hit the phase where the guys from Harvard and Stanford are running the teams, and fitting all your players under a finite sum that changes from season to season (or in some cases doesn't when you were hoping it would) isn't as easy as getting out the calculator. 

Homer fixed the Flyers' problems by tossing some money at them, and like many free agent signings and trades, they didn't all pan out perfectly well. Just look at some of the other signings around the league that year. We knew Briere's deal would hurt later in its term, but most fans were spoiling for a quick fix too. I imagine it's been frustrating for the club that Briere has played inconsistently during his time here, showing flashes of brilliance followed by droughts. He's also been slowed or off the ice entirely due to abdominal injuries. But he's also the guy who scored 30 points for the Flyers in the playoffs this season. Contract looked mighty fine for a few weeks this spring... One of the biggest knocks against Homer for two seasons became the most dangerous offensive weapon on the road to a Cup Finals appearance. Maybe a permanent move back to center is in the cards for Briere. Obviously, this would mean an even bigger logjam up the middle, possibly resulting in a trade.

Hartnell... Well, yeah, it's a bad contract. But a lot of that is on #19 himself, who played more than a few games looking like he had money on the other team this year. Whatever was going on with him off the ice flat out destroyed him, physically and mentally. He did rebound late in the playoffs though, so if he's not one of the players moved in the off-season (which would require him allowing the trade), maybe we'll see him in better shape next season. If he can put up 25 goals like we know he has the ability to, the contract becomes more palatable. 

Those two contracts overshadow some truly outstanding acquisitions by Homer though. Perhaps the Pronger deal still has fans divided, but I haven't heard from its critics much lately. Pronger was amazing last season, exactly what this team needed, and he's got a ton of hockey left in him. Kimmo Timonen is a Homer guy that doesn't get mentioned when GM piñata is hanging from the tree. What about that gunpoint robbery of the Red Wings for the Flyers' new rookie record holder for points in the playoff, Ville the Kid Leino? How about the fact that Homer didn't lock up Braydon Coburn when everyone everywhere thought he would be amazing for years to come? Coburn may still get a deal, but I doubt it will be what his side wanted during previous negotiations. Other trades may not have gone as obviously well, with the Carcillo-Upshall deal still a major dividing line for fans. Again, understandable. 

There are eggshells in the omelette until we have a Cup. 

What's Next?
As of this posting, we're still waiting to hear that Dan Hamhuis has signed. We originally guessed at a $4 million/year deal, but reports have his side wanting more and Homer not taking the bait just yet. Tim Panaccio now thinks the deal will not be done this weekend, and that leaves a big question mark while Homer fields and places calls for other potential players. If not signed by July 1, Hamhuis becomes a free agent. While we all want to see Hamhuis in a Flyers uni, it's great to see restraint on the part of Holmgren. A few seasons ago, Hamhuis might already have a deal signed, a no-trader, and a Flyers boat parked in his driveway. 

The goalie market is again a fickle lot this off-season. I'm not wild about the reports that the Flyers were talking to the Bruins about Tim Thomas, who lost his job last season after getting a big deal following a career season, but I'm not putting a whole lot of stock into anything there just yet either. He's old and owed a lot of money, and he lost his job last season (albeit to a very talented kid). Don't see that as a good fit here... 

The way the goalie market has played out recently has not been cap-friendly to many teams. The champion Blackhawks are even shedding salary in serviceable players while their previously ordained #1 swings the gate for Antti Niemi, who makes millions less per season than Huet. Evgeni Nabokov has been shown the door in San Jose. Thomas gave way to a rookie. 

Meanwhile, two guys who were relative nobodies backstopped their teams in the Stanley Cup Finals this year. Ryan Millers don't grow on trees, and it's not the worst thing in the world to build your team up to support whomever's in net, rather than vice-versa. One injury changes everything, and even Miller couldn't keep his club alive this postseason. 

Anthony San Filippo reported months ago that the Flyers would be looking for a young goalie to backstop their team for years to come. Despite the trip to the Finals, it seems that's still their goal. We could find out who that player is tonight, or over the weekend. If Hamhuis signs, the Flyers' starting goalie next season will be perched behind one of the league's truly elite defenses, a great situation to build within. However, it's still possible that we'll see Michael Leighton, Brian Boucher, and Johan Backlund on the depth chart come this fall.

There are other moves to be made as well. Claude Giroux needs to skate with scorers. The role players may need to be shuffled. For the latter, we've seen Homer bring in the likes of Ian Laperriere and Blair Betts a season after he was nailed to the cross for losing Glen Metropolit. He's got an eye for gritty players. 

In summary, I'm feeling confident that Paul Holmgren will put a contender on the ice next season just as he did last. The team will have more time under Laviolette's system, and the young core is more experienced. I've made my peace with the Cup loss, and I'm starting to get excited for what happens next. Hopefully the man pushing the buttons has learned enough from what didn't go so well in the past, because mistakes are costlier than ever in this league, and the Flyers' window is now. 

Housekeeping
Enrico and I will be off the grid for most of the day and night, so if a deal happens, we'll be counting on you to update this thread or whatever quickie we can toss up until getting into further detail tomorrow. 

I've been meaning to say this since the series ended, but thank you all for reading this season and for the comments you've left. It is a pleasure to experience the Flyers with you and learn more about our team and our fans through all of our many exchanges. You guys and gals are really awesome. Now go ahead and give it to me for being a homer.

Photo by Getty

Instant Replay: Nationals 4, Phillies 3

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Instant Replay: Nationals 4, Phillies 3

BOX SCORE

Jeremy Hellickson did everything he could Monday night to stop the bleeding a rough road trip through Detroit and Chicago provided the Phillies.

But the usually consistent Hector Neris had his worst inning of the year and Washington pounced.

The Nationals scored three runs in the top of the eighth inning and snapped a four-game losing streak to the Phillies with a 4-3 win on Monday at Citizens Bank Park.

Jayson Werth’s two-out RBI single plated the tying run in the top of the eighth to even the score at 2-2. Neris then walked Chris Heisey to load the bases for Daniel Murphy, who homered earlier. He delivered with the crushing blow, a two-run single that put the Nationals ahead for good.

Jonathan Papelbon, whom the Phillies have had success against at Citizens Bank Park, worked around back-to-back doubles by Maikel Franco and Ryan Howard to start the ninth inning and to pick up his 14th save of the season.

Papelbon fanned pinch-hitter Tommy Joseph with a slider, blew a fastball by Cesar Hernandez and got Tyler Goeddel to line out to second base to end the game.

The Phillies, now losers in eight of 10, saw their record fall to 26-25. On Tuesday, they’ll try to avoid falling to .500 for the first time since April 26.

Starting pitching report
In a pitcher’s duel against Washington’s Tanner Roark, Hellickson was dominant in seven innings of work. He needed just 79 pitches in those innings before being lifted for a pinch-hitter in the bottom of the seventh inning.

For the fifth straight time, Hellickson held his opponents to three runs or less. He struck out eight Nationals and scattered just three hits while not issuing a walk. Hellickson left the game in line for the win, but the Phillies' usually efficient bullpen faltered.

Hellickson struck out the side in the sixth inning, which ended with Werth swinging through a breaking ball.

Bullpen report
Neris entered Monday having not given up a run since May 6, a streak of nine and 2/3 innings. He started off by striking out Wilson Ramos with his nasty splitter.

Neris then walked Danny Espinosa before getting pinch-hitter Clint Robinson to line out for the inning’s second out. But command continued to be an issue. Neris walked Ben Revere to keep the inning alive for Werth, who made him pay. And then Murphy made it worse.

Jeanmar Gomez came on to clean up the eighth inning and then pitched a perfect ninth inning.

At the plate
The Phillies used their small ball ways to score the game’s first run in the bottom of the second. Back-to-back one-out walks of Hernandez, who would steal second and reach third on a wild pitch, and Goeddel put runners on the corners for Hellickson, who executed a perfect sacrifice safety squeeze bunt to score Hernandez.

After Washington tied the game at 1-1 on a Murphy home run, the Phillies struck back in the bottom of the sixth with a Freddy Galvis homer on a 1-2 slider down in the zone. Galvis went down to get the pitch and drove it to the right field seats for what turned out to be the game-winning run.

Howard, who was given the start at first base after sitting Sunday, was 0 for 3 with a pair of strikeouts and a long flyout to deep right-centerfield before he smashed an RBI double to follow up Franco’s double to kick off the ninth inning.

In the field
Howard’s leaping catch of Ramos’ line drive to end the second inning helped keep the Nationals off the board early.

Goeddel, who made that game-ending throw to the plate a few weeks back, again showed off his arm in the top of the seventh inning. With Bryce Harper on first base after being hit by a Hellickson fastball in the knee, Murphy, moments after hitting a home run foul and out of play, drove a pitch toward the gap in left-centerfield.

Goeddel closed on it and quickly fired to first. Harper, slow getting back to the base, was doubled off as Howard deceptively waited to show his glove until the ball neared. Washington manager Dusty Baker challenged the play, but a review that lasted two minutes and 15 seconds confirmed the call on the field.

Franco made a catch in the eighth inning similar to Howard’s. Robinson sent a line shot over the head of Franco, who made a full-extension grab with his glove. He appeared to injure his left shoulder on the play but remained in the game.

Asche on the way?
Cody Asche, who continues to work his way back from an oblique injury, went 1 for 4 Monday afternoon with a home run - his second during his rehab assignment - in Lehigh Valley’s 6-4 win over Norfolk.

Asche’s 20-day rehab assignment concludes Wednesday. Phillies manager Pete Mackanin said the club would look at Asche then and said it's a “possibility” the 25-year-old joins the Phillies after.

Up next
The Phillies continue their 10-game homestand on Tuesday with Aaron Nola (4-3, 2.86 ERA) facing off against Washington’s Joe Ross (4-4, 2.52).

NL East Wrap: Mets SP Matt Harvey gets back on track in win over White Sox

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NL East Wrap: Mets SP Matt Harvey gets back on track in win over White Sox

NEW YORK -- On the mound in the seventh inning for the first time this season, Matt Harvey gave up his first walk of the game and his second hit, leading to a sacrifice bunt and a second-and-third jam.

"You kind of think about the worst at that point," he said. "You start getting some negative thoughts that creep in your head."

But 11 days after disappointed fans at Citi Field booed him like a villain, the Dark Knight was back - at least for one afternoon.

Harvey retired Todd Frazier on a foulout and J.B. Shuck on a grounder to escape trouble, Neil Walker homered off Jose Quintana on the second pitch of the bottom half and the New York Mets beat Chicago 1-0 Monday to send the reeling White Sox to their seventh straight loss.

"Today's a big first step," Mets manager Terry Collins said.

Addison Reed and Jeurys Familia got six straight outs to complete the two-hitter, preserving Harvey's first win since May 8. Harvey struck out six, walked two and threw four pitches of 98-98.5 mph after not topping 97.5 mph previously this season. He threw 61 of 87 pitches for strikes (see full recap).

Mallex Smith's 3-run triple powers Braves past Giants
ATLANTA -- Mike Foltynewicz is showing he can be more than just a fastball pitcher - and that he can be part of the Braves' long-term rotation.

Foltynewicz continued his recent upswing by allowing only three hits and one run in six-plus innings, Mallex Smith hit a three-run triple and Atlanta beat Jeff Samardzija and the San Francisco Giants 5-3 on Monday.

The Braves survived San Francisco's two-run, ninth-inning rally. They have won three of four and are 5-21 at home, still easily the worst in the majors.

Foltynewicz (2-2) gave up a leadoff homer to Brandon Belt in the second inning, but allowed only one other runner to advance to second.

Foltynewicz, 24, has had other recent strong starts, including eight scoreless innings in a 5-0 win at Kansas City on May 14. His start on Monday may have been his most impressive demonstration of altering the speeds of his fastball while mixing in a curveball and slider (see full recap).

Locke tosses three-hit shutout against Marlins
MIAMI -- Jeff Locke tossed a three-hitter and the Pittsburgh Pirates beat the Miami Marlins 10-0 on Monday night.

Gregory Polanco's grand slam, Sean Rodriguez's two-run homer, and David Freese's four hits helped power the offense for the Pirates, who won the first of a four-game series in Miami. The first two games were originally scheduled to be played in Puerto Rico, but were moved due to concerns of the Zika virus.

Locke (4-3) struck out one and did not walk a batter while throwing 67 of 105 pitches for strikes. It was his first complete game in 101 career starts. Locke retired 19 straight at one point and needed just six pitches to get through the seventh inning.

The announced crowd of 10,856 was a season-low for the Marlins, who entered the day averaging just under 20,000.

Gary Bettman talks NHL expansion, missing Ed Snider's presence, 2018 Winter Olympics

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Gary Bettman talks NHL expansion, missing Ed Snider's presence, 2018 Winter Olympics

PITTSBURGH -- NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman offered no clues on Monday during his annual Stanley Cup Final address as to the state of NHL expansion or the current odds that Las Vegas gets a franchise.
 
The league’s Board of Governors will meet on June 22 to make a decision on expansion. The earliest a team(s) could play would be 2017-18.
 
Quebec City is also in the running, but the value of the Canadian dollars weighs heavily against another team being added north of the border at the moment.
 
If a Vegas franchise is added, it would have a direct impact on Pacific Division clubs such as the Sharks, who take on the Penguins in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final Monday night at CONSOL Energy Center.
 
Bettman refused to “handicap” the situation but said he expected to know at least a week in advance as to what the committee’s recommendation will be.
 
Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly said there are “a lot of on-going” issues related to expansion and some involve input from third parties.
 
“We’ve made good progress ... it hasn’t been quick progress,” Daly said.
 
Asked about rumors of the NFL, specifically the Oakland Raiders, going to Vegas and what that impact would mean to hockey, Bettman said he hasn’t even broached the topic of having two pro sports there with NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell or even considered such.
 
“If the NFL comes to Vegas at some point, so be it,” Bettman said. “We’re judging the application we have before us on the merits of that application.”
 
Bettman said the thought the NFL moving to Vegas, in his opinion, wasn’t “anywhere close to a done deal.”
 
Daly added that even if there is movement by the NFL toward Vegas, it would not be seen as a “deterrent” to the NHL expanding there.
 
Snider not replaced
Bettman said that former Flyers chairman Ed Snider’s spot on the 10-person executive and competition committees has not been filled since Snider's death in April.
 
Snider was an original member of the league’s competition committee and the only owner on it.
 
“He was a great owner and is terribly missed,” Bettman said.

More Olympic issues  
IOC President Thomas Bach and IIHF President Rene Fasel have gone on record they want to end paying the out-of-pocket expenses for NHL players to attend the Olympics.
 
That’s a non-starter for the NHL if both organizations want participation of the NHL's players at the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea. The practice of subsidy has been in effect for the past five Winter Olympics.
 
“If they are unable to resolve the issue, I have no doubt it will have an impact on our decision,” Bettman said, adding the NHL would have to take a hard look at continued Olympic participation since its member clubs aren’t interested in putting up the “many, many millions” it would take to make up the financial gap.
 
Whenever there is change in the IOC leadership, Bettman said, there are always discussions of whether some sports, such as hockey, should receive subsidies.