Is a Future WrestleMania Coming to Philadelphia?

Is a Future WrestleMania Coming to Philadelphia?

Yeah, yeah, professional wrestling is “fake,” and it’s definitely not for everybody. Nevertheless, World Wrestling Entertainment holding its largest and most renowned event of the year – their Super Bowl if you will – in Philadelphia would be a very big deal.

According to a report, it could happen soon. Via 6abc, the city has expressed an interest in hosting the show at Lincoln Financial Field, an idea the WWE did not explicitly shoot down in an official statement on the matter. They didn’t indicate Mania might be coming to Philly, either, but the speculation is already rampant.

The success of WM 29 at MetLife Stadium – home to the New York Giants and Jets – this past April proved to company executives that outdoor venues in the northeast are viable, the possibility for inclement weather being the greatest concern that time of year. Philadelphia also has a long and storied tradition as one of the sport’s hotbeds, thus making it a logical destination in the region.

The most recent and only WrestleMania held in Philly was XV in 1999 inside the Wells Fargo Center, headlined by Stone Cold Steve Austin versus The Rock.

The event has not been held in a standard arena since 2006 in Chicago. Since then, it’s been cycled through a series of baseball and/or football stadiums which can hold 2-to-4 times as many people. 80,000-plus spectators were in attendance at MetLife this year.

If you’ve gotten this far and you’re not a wrestling fan, congratulations. Just to demonstrate how enormous having this event here would be, people from all 50 states and 34 countries around the world bought tickets to WrestleMania in 2013. It’s evolved into a nearly week-long party, with special access for fans leading up to the big day, and typically capped off by the live broadcast of their flagship Monday Night Raw the next night.

In other words, it’s a major, major tourism boost for the city economy.

Don’t get your hopes up for this coming April though. WrestleMania XXX is already booked for the Superdome in New Orleans. The apparent target dates would be 2015 or ’16. I’d mention I hope this comes to fruition, but you have to figure eventually the WWE will find a way to bring its marquee event back to the City of Brothery Love.

Coincidentally, the WWE is hosting its annual Money in the Bank pay-per-view at the WFC this Sunday. Looks like a fantastic card, too.

>> Philadelphia interested in hosting WrestleMania [6abc]

Photo via WWE.com

Sixers' game vs. Kings rescheduled for Jan. 30

Sixers' game vs. Kings rescheduled for Jan. 30

The NBA has determined a new date for the Sixers home game against the Kings, which was postponed on Nov. 30 because of unsafe playing conditions on the court.

The game has been rescheduled for Monday, Jan. 30 at 6 p.m. This will create back-to-backs for both teams.

The Sixers are playing in Chicago on Jan. 29. They will play consecutive games against the Bulls and Kings, then have a road back-to-back against the Mavericks and Spurs on Feb. 1 and 2.

The Kings will be on what is now an eight-game road trip. They will play a back-to-back against the Rockets the next night in Houston.

Former Flyers coach Bill Dineen dies at 84

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The Associated Press

Former Flyers coach Bill Dineen dies at 84

Bill Dineen, who had the distinction of being Eric Lindros’ first NHL coach, died early Saturday morning at his home in Lake George, New York. He was 84.
 
“Such a wonderful person, who got along with everybody,” Flyers president Paul Holmgren said. “I never played for him, but worked with him in scouting. Just a great guy.” 
 
Dineen succeeded Holmgren as head coach during the 1991-92 season.
 
“When I got fired, a lot of our guys were squeezing their sticks,” Holmgren said. “They were tight. It shouldn’t be hard to play the game. When things got tough, they were a little under stress, Billy coming in, he loosened things up.”
 
Dineen coached parts of two seasons here from 1991-92 through the 1992-93 season, which was Lindros’ first year as a Flyer.
 
“Bill treated everyone with the utmost respect,” Holmgren said. “He was the perfect guy for Eric coming in here. That respect goes both ways. He was almost a grandfatherly figure for Eric at the time.”

Dineen served as a scout with the organization from 1990-91 until succeeding Holmgren as coach. He then returned to a scouting role in 1993-94 and remained with the Flyers as a scout through 1996-97.
 
Mark Howe, one of the greatest Flyers defensemen of all-time, played for Dineen as an 18-year-old rookie in the WHA with the Houston Aeros (1973-74), and also had him during his final year as a Flyer in 1991-92.
 
“He was one of the best people I ever met in the game of hockey,” Howe said. “He was a real players coach. Of all the guys I ever played for. Maybe a little Paul Holmgren, too. 
 
“If you lost the game, he was one of the very few people if you went for a bite to eat or a beer after the game you lost, you actually felt poorly for letting the coach down.”
 
Howe said Dineen’s teams weren’t all about skill.
 
“He picked people that were about ‘the team,'” Howe said. “He made me earn my spot that first year in Houston.”
 
Dineen posted a 60-60-20 record with the Flyers. His son, Kevin, played on both of those teams before assuming the captaincy from Rick Tocchet in 1993-94. 
 
A gentleman behind the bench, Bill Dineen was much the same person as a player. A former right wing who spent the majority of his six-year playing career with the Detroit Red Wings, he had just 122 penalty minutes in 322 games, scoring 51 goals and 95 points.
 
“I knew Billy for a long time," Flyers senior vice president Bob Clarke said. "He was a player and coach at the minor league level and the NHL level, but I think more importantly he was a really, really good hockey person and really good person.” 

Dineen won two WHA titles coaching the Aeros and two Stanley Cups as a player with the Red Wings. A member of the AHL Hall of Fame, Dineen also coached the Adirondack Red Wings from 1983 through 1988-89.
 
Three of his five sons — Gordon, Peter and Kevin — played in the NHL. Sons Shawn and Jerry had their roots in the AHL. 
 
“His boys are scattered all over the map,” Holmgren said. “Just a tremendous hockey family.”
 
Dineen is part of Flyer folklore trivia. He, along with Keith Allen and Vic Stasiuk, were all Red Wings teammates during 1953-53. They also shared something else in common: all three later  became Flyers head coaches.