Jerry Jones doesn’t hire a GM because he’ll just ruin the Cowboys anyway

Jerry Jones doesn’t hire a GM because he’ll just ruin the Cowboys anyway

The Philadelphia Eagles got knocked down a peg on Sunday, but that’s okay, because the Dallas Cowboys in December. Tony Romo shoulders a lot of the blame for their historic collapse—as well he should—but let’s not forget their porous defense, clueless coaching staff, and most of all, the man behind the curtain.

It’s a Dallas fan’s greatest lament that Jerry Jones will still be the club’s general manager after this season ends, and every other season, because Jerry Jones isn’t going to fire Jerry Jones. Not only does the owner of the Cowboys admit he’d just meddle with a proper GM anyway, at 71 years of age, Jones seems blissfully unaware that he may not have all the answers.

Per Tim MacMahon for ESPNDallas.com, Jones talked about why he won’t replace himself as the top decision-maker on all matters of personnel for a local radio interview.

"It's often said that, why don't I get someone to be the GM?" Jerry Jones said Tuesday on 105.3 The Fan. "Why don't I get someone to pick the players? Well, who in the world do you think that person when they walk through the door and say, ‘We want to get this player or we want to pay this player,' what in the world do you think I'm going to do? I'm going to sit down and I'm going to go through it and I'm going to say, ‘Show me the player. Show me everything about the player before I write the check. Show me the player and let me see everything about the player.'

"Well, rather than that have happen, I get involved in it and know everything about the players before they get to the door. That, if you've got the time to do it, that's a better way to do it."

I rather enjoyed MacMahon’s interpretation of Jones’ speech, too.

Why hire an architect when you've got time to decide how you want your house to look, right? Never mind that you keep building houses with leaky roofs and crumbling foundations.

The Cowboys have only won one playoff game in the last 17 years, and while Jones would tell you he was responsible for their three Super Bowl wins in the 90s, anybody who was around the team would credit Jimmy Johnson for building that dynasty. The man is living in denial, which has made for some great theater for Eagles fans.

>> Jerry: ‘Why don’t I get someone to be GM?’ [ESPN]

There were Carson Wentz and Ben Simmons fans at the debate last night

There were Carson Wentz and Ben Simmons fans at the debate last night

I'm not sure if they could win nationally, but there is absolutely no doubt that a Wentz-Simmons ticket would dominate the Delaware Valley.

An intrepid Philadelphia sports fan was up at the Presidential Debate last night at Hofstra University and made a sign showing his support... for the Eagles and Sixers.

I don't know though, I'm pretty sure Simmons was born in Australia.

Pinpoint touch passes show Carson Wentz has a killer changeup, too

Pinpoint touch passes show Carson Wentz has a killer changeup, too

Now the kid has a changeup, too.

A couple of the most impressive passes Carson Wentz threw Sunday weren’t fired to the receiver. They didn’t show off Wentz’s rocket-launcher right arm.

They were touch passes. Lobs. Looping things of beauty that floated high into the air above the coverage and settled softly into the hands of a receiver on the run.

Wentz, the Eagles’ 23-year-old wunderkind of a quarterback, displayed remarkable touch on a couple of his biggest passes in the Eagles’ 34-3 win over the Steelers at the Linc on Sunday.

It’s just the latest evolution in the development of the remarkable young Eagles quarterback.

He doesn’t just fire it. He floats it, too.

“It is a challenging thing,” head coach Doug Pederson said. “Because in practice, if you’re not working on those types of throws, it just doesn't happen.

“It’s sort of a math problem in your head as a quarterback because you have a receiver that's running away from you at full speed and you are trying to put a touch pass on a 20-, 25-yard throw and so you have to judge it just right.

“That's a lot harder to do than just zipping it right at your target.”

On the 73-yard touchdown pass to Darren Sproles, Wentz stood in the pocket, looked to his left and started scrambling to the right when he spotted Sproles racing down the right sideline with a step on Steelers linebacker Ryan Shazier.

In full stride, running to his right, Wentz threw across his body and lobbed the ball from the Eagles’ 25-yard line to a point near the 50-yard line. Sproles caught the ball without breaking stride and did the rest, eventually scoring a TD that turned a 10-point lead into a 17-point lead early in the third quarter.

In the third quarter, Wentz connected similarly with tight end Brent Celek on a 24-yard gain, this time lobbing the ball above linebacker Vince Williams and in front of safety Sean Davis for a first down inside the Pittsburgh 30-yard line to set up another touchdown.

After three games, Wentz is 3-0 with five touchdown passes, no interceptions, 65 percent completions and a 103.7 passer rating. He's the first quarterback in NFL history to open his career with three wins without an interception.

A lot of young quarterbacks want to fire every ball as hard as possible. But Wentz’s ability to change up and lob the football to his receivers makes him even more dangerous. Kind of like a young fastball pitcher who suddenly shows up in spring training with a killer changeup.

“It can be hard because you are so geared on throwing everything fast and hard,” Pederson said. “That throw to Celek was a thing of beauty. The week before, the Monday night (game), to Jordan Matthews, the little touch pass was great. The little floater to Darren for the long touchdown run was another one that was a touch pass with accuracy.

“Those are hard throws to make. Having been in that position before, those are hard. The guy is running away from you and you are trying to put air on a throw but still judge the distance and the speed of the receiver. Those are tough things to do. He really has a good feel for that and it just makes him an all-around solid quarterback.

“That’s just who he is and (shows) his ability to make really all the throws.”