On Yankee Stadium & The Bleachers

On Yankee Stadium & The Bleachers

Sunday had the makings of a great baseball game long before CC Sabathia threw a single pitch. The defending world champions of baseball were playing for a series win at Yankee Stadium against a stacked New York squad and it'd be my first time ever stepping foot in the Bronx to catch a game.

Being a huge baseball fan, I'm rather ashamed that I never stepped foot into the House That Ruth Built. Such is life, I guess. Taking the D train to the stadium on Sunday in a car full of Phillies fans had me about as excited as I've ever been to see a ball game in enemy territory.

The atmosphere and the game did not disappoint but the ball park did to a certain extent.

In my opinion, Fenway Park and Wrigley Field are living relics of baseball lore that make you feel like you're watching the best game in the world at one of the places where it was birthed. For some reason, despite knowing the billion dollar new Yankee Stadium was brand new, I was hoping to feel that way on Sunday. As a whole, the park left me underwhelmed.

As a disclaimer, I didn't see a ton of the park. It was my first time watching the Fightins in a while and I wanted to focus on the great game on the field. I certainly need to go back and explore the park to get a better feel for it as a whole. We sat in the first row of the bleachers which was a great spot to watch the game.

My stadium experience was highly focused on the bleachers section and the concession stands in centerfield. Not wanting to miss much of the action, we waited in line in the centerfield concessions for about 10 minutes for a hot dog and when we got to the front of the line they were OUT OF HOT DOGS. Unacceptable at a ball game unless it's the eighth inning of dollar dog night.

For the most part I was unimpressed with the design of the place. I didn't experience any quirky park designs like an Ashburn Alley or the standing room square in centerfield at CBP. The huge screen in center at Yankee Stadium is an amazing piece of technology with an insanely crisp picture. It makes you feel like you're watching a game at exactly what Yankee Stadium is, the future of ball parks. Call me old school, but I had mixed emotions about that.

Things I Loved About Yankee Stadium: The Baseball Atmosphere

We sat in the first row of section 235 and were surrounded by great fans of both teams. There were clearly more opposing fans than Yankees fans are used to. The friendly Yanks fan next to me chirped about mistakenly "buying tickets in the only Phillies section of Yankee Stadium." We were loud and plentiful.

The bleachers didn't have the negative vibe of a Mets game at Citizens Bank Park, perhaps due in part to the lack of any real history or bad blood between the teams (or the lack of jorted Mets fans), but there was plenty of fun back and forth banter. There was an old timer Phillies fan in our row wearing suspenders giving a 20-something Yankees fan the goods all game. When the Yanks got to Lidge *again* the New Yorker didn't hesitate to make his elder very clear on what just happened.

To me, it was the perfect level of respectable trash talking. Two smart fan bases talking smack about the game on the field without any real signs of personal attacks or thrown beer. It made the game fun.

I thoroughly enjoyed the right field bleacher tradition of chanting out all of the Yanks' names in the first inning. Johnny Damon recognized them the best while Jeter and A-Rod were too cool for school. The grounds crew performance of YMCA was also impressive.

I guess I loved the atmosphere but was unimpressed with the building while acknowledging the fact I didn't see a lot of it.

All of these amazing photos were taken by Brad Maule of PhillySkyline fame. He was also at the Sunday game and has a much more in-depth look at the ball park and some of the seats with actual backs, something the bleachers obviously lack. His photo gallery from the game and his run in with Montie on the subway are worth your clicks.

Finally, did you see Mark Teixera hit a home run way out in left on a broken bat swing? Crazy. Keep an eye out for a fan sporting an "ill" shirt in the video.

Thank goodness for Chooch's heroics for making Sunday a very memorable day.

Carson Wentz falls far behind Elliott, Prescott in Rookie of Year odds

Carson Wentz falls far behind Elliott, Prescott in Rookie of Year odds

Carson Wentz's Rookie of the Year odds took a hit, the Eagles' Super Bowl odds shortened and the Vikings' lengthened after Sunday's 21-10 win.

The Eagles are 33/1 to win it all, a week after being listed by Bovada at 50/1. The Vikings, meanwhile, went from 7/1 to 9/1. They still have the third-shortest Super Bowl odds in the NFL and are two spots ahead of the Cowboys (14/1). 

Wentz, who had his worst statistical game against Minnesota, is now 9/1 to win NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year, according to Bovada. Last Wednesday, he was 6/1.

Wentz trails Cowboys studs Ezekiel Elliott (2/5) and Dak Prescott (11/5) on that leaderboard.

As far as this week, Wentz is favored to throw for more yards than Prescott. Wentz is 5/7 to outgain Prescott through the air in Week 8, while Prescott is 1/1 to outgain Wentz.

Elliott's over/under rushing total against the Eagles is 99.5. He's rushed for 130-plus yards in each of his last four games, and the odds are 3/1 that he'll reach that number again this week. 

The Eagles have allowed just one 100-yard rusher this season, Washington's Matt Jones (16 for 135).

Elliott is also now on pace to break Eric Dickerson's rookie rushing record. Dickerson had 1,808 in 1983; Elliott is on pace for 1,875. Will Elliott break that 33-year-old mark? A "yes" bet pays 2/1; a "no" bet pays 1/3.

Dave Hakstol did Steve Mason a favor by challenging Sabres' 3rd goal

Dave Hakstol did Steve Mason a favor by challenging Sabres' 3rd goal

Many, though not all hockey games, have a tipping point or pivotal moment that factors into the outcome.
Sometimes it’s obvious what it was and when the moment occurred. Other times, it’s overshadowed by something else on the ice.
Ask the Flyers which moment would define their come-from-behind 4-3 shootout victory over Buffalo on Tuesday and the response will be virtually unanimous: when Dmitry Kulikov leveled Jakub Voracek with a high hit that made contact to the head in the third period.
Voracek was forced off the ice under the NHL’s concussion protocol.
That hit incensed the Flyers, who went on to score two power-play goals and tie the game, 3-3. The comeback was on.
Yet there was a less obvious but significant point that happened late in the second period, and it concerned goalie Steve Mason.
Matt Moulson had given Buffalo a 3-0 lead on Michal Neuvirth at 15:43, when Flyers coach Dave Hakstol elected to make a goalie switch.
Rather than call a simple timeout to buy Mason some warm-up time and allow his team to collect itself on the bench, Hakstol challenged the goal, claiming “goalie interference.”
Replays won’t show any direct interference on the shot itself. Neuvirth was speared several seconds before the play developed.
Hakstol knew the goal would likely not be overturned, but his strategy was to buy time for Mason and his team. By using a challenge, he knew the review process would take a lot longer than the 60-second timeout.
Either way, he was going to use his only timeout.
“You know what, I think we needed a timeout at that time, anyway,” Hakstol said coyly. “Pretty low probability of it being successful. Everything worked out well in the end.”
Mason appreciated what his coach did, too. Buying extra time for you?
“Yeah, probably,” Mason replied. “Regardless of the situation, you’re sitting on the bench, you know? You’re not really gauged as much as when you’re playing, obviously. So, you just try and ramp things up as quickly as possible.”
Mason had two saves in that shortened period, five in the third period and one in the overtime to register his second victory.
“There’s a never-quit attitude in this room,” he said. “We showed in Chicago — we were just talking about that. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to close that one out.
“But guys have a belief that you get one [moment] and it comes. [Travis Konecny] got us going with his first NHL goal, which is great. The guys really pushed to capitalize on their chances.” ​