Quotable: Could Both Lee and Werth Have Been Phillies?

Quotable: Could Both Lee and Werth Have Been Phillies?

Jayson Werth thinks so. The right fielder arrived at spring training today, joining his new Washington Nationals teammates for the first time since signing a $126 million, seven-year contract in December. Even as reality sets in, and he has to actually play baseball for the Nats, Werth still seems to believe the Phillies could have retained his services, while simultaneously making a play for Cliff Lee. And is he taking a hack at Fightins management here? Via High Cheese:

“I think if they would have played it right they would have had us both. I mean, they traded Cliff away for prospects and then realized that was probably not what they should have done."

“They ended up paying him a lot more than they would have if they’d signed him the year before. Then we would have had him. Chances are if they had signed him before they traded him, it probably would have made it a little easier to sign me.”

So before the jump, Werth probably isn't saying anything too outrageous. The majority of fans and observers felt trading Lee was a mistake at the time. You could argue everything worked out just fine, or in fact better this way. You could argue they didn't win the World Series last season, and going outside the organization's philosophy to bring Lee back was telling. Either way, that's resolved now.

Werth's insistance all those shenanigans had a role to play in the Phillies' inability to have both players is a little harder to swallow.

First of all, keep in mind Cliff Lee took a lesser offer for the chance to don the red pinstripes again. Werth did the exact opposite, taking the largest offer on the table. It wasn't merely a question of money ether, it was years. Offers from both Philadelphia and Boston were reportedly comparable in average salary, but neither club was willing to give the 31-year-old seven years.

Now is he maybe suggesting had there been some inclanation Lee would be a Phillie in 2011, Werth would have been more receptive to a shorter deal? Oh, wait. Asked whether he was surprised by the signing, Werth responded:

“Not really. I had an inside edge.”

“I kind of knew it was always a possibility and I kind of felt it was going to be one or the other. At that point. When it wasn’t me, and what they were talking to me about in terms of years, it kind of made it seem like they were playing us off against each other a little bit.

In other words, the Phillies could have both Lee and Werth... had they simply caved to Werth's demands.

There is absolutely no indication from those remarks that the presence of Cliff would have made any impact in the number of years Jayson Werth asked for. Even if the Phils could have signed Lee for less back in 2009, a suspect claim to begin with, pure dollars and cents never really appeared to be at the heart of the issue in the first place.

It sounds like sour grapes from Werth as he gets set for a year of tedium in D.C., while Cliff Lee and the rest of the Phillies are once again being treated like rock stars, heading into another season where they are the clear National League favorites. Just don't tell him that.

“Hard feelings? No. It’s a business."

>> Werth: Phillies could have had me and Lee [High Cheese]
AP photo

Carson Wentz falls far behind Elliott, Prescott in Rookie of Year odds

Carson Wentz falls far behind Elliott, Prescott in Rookie of Year odds

Carson Wentz's Rookie of the Year odds took a hit, the Eagles' Super Bowl odds shortened and the Vikings' lengthened after Sunday's 21-10 win.

The Eagles are 33/1 to win it all, a week after being listed by Bovada at 50/1. The Vikings, meanwhile, went from 7/1 to 9/1. They still have the third-shortest Super Bowl odds in the NFL and are two spots ahead of the Cowboys (14/1). 

Wentz, who had his worst statistical game against Minnesota, is now 9/1 to win NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year, according to Bovada. Last Wednesday, he was 6/1.

Wentz trails Cowboys studs Ezekiel Elliott (2/5) and Dak Prescott (11/5) on that leaderboard.

As far as this week, Wentz is favored to throw for more yards than Prescott. Wentz is 5/7 to outgain Prescott through the air in Week 8, while Prescott is 1/1 to outgain Wentz.

Elliott's over/under rushing total against the Eagles is 99.5. He's rushed for 130-plus yards in each of his last four games, and the odds are 3/1 that he'll reach that number again this week. 

The Eagles have allowed just one 100-yard rusher this season, Washington's Matt Jones (16 for 135).

Elliott is also now on pace to break Eric Dickerson's rookie rushing record. Dickerson had 1,808 in 1983; Elliott is on pace for 1,875. Will Elliott break that 33-year-old mark? A "yes" bet pays 2/1; a "no" bet pays 1/3.

Dave Hakstol did Steve Mason a favor by challenging Sabres' 3rd goal

Dave Hakstol did Steve Mason a favor by challenging Sabres' 3rd goal

Many, though not all hockey games, have a tipping point or pivotal moment that factors into the outcome.
Sometimes it’s obvious what it was and when the moment occurred. Other times, it’s overshadowed by something else on the ice.
Ask the Flyers which moment would define their come-from-behind 4-3 shootout victory over Buffalo on Tuesday and the response will be virtually unanimous: when Dmitry Kulikov leveled Jakub Voracek with a high hit that made contact to the head in the third period.
Voracek was forced off the ice under the NHL’s concussion protocol.
That hit incensed the Flyers, who went on to score two power-play goals and tie the game, 3-3. The comeback was on.
Yet there was a less obvious but significant point that happened late in the second period, and it concerned goalie Steve Mason.
Matt Moulson had given Buffalo a 3-0 lead on Michal Neuvirth at 15:43, when Flyers coach Dave Hakstol elected to make a goalie switch.
Rather than call a simple timeout to buy Mason some warm-up time and allow his team to collect itself on the bench, Hakstol challenged the goal, claiming “goalie interference.”
Replays won’t show any direct interference on the shot itself. Neuvirth was speared several seconds before the play developed.
Hakstol knew the goal would likely not be overturned, but his strategy was to buy time for Mason and his team. By using a challenge, he knew the review process would take a lot longer than the 60-second timeout.
Either way, he was going to use his only timeout.
“You know what, I think we needed a timeout at that time, anyway,” Hakstol said coyly. “Pretty low probability of it being successful. Everything worked out well in the end.”
Mason appreciated what his coach did, too. Buying extra time for you?
“Yeah, probably,” Mason replied. “Regardless of the situation, you’re sitting on the bench, you know? You’re not really gauged as much as when you’re playing, obviously. So, you just try and ramp things up as quickly as possible.”
Mason had two saves in that shortened period, five in the third period and one in the overtime to register his second victory.
“There’s a never-quit attitude in this room,” he said. “We showed in Chicago — we were just talking about that. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to close that one out.
“But guys have a belief that you get one [moment] and it comes. [Travis Konecny] got us going with his first NHL goal, which is great. The guys really pushed to capitalize on their chances.” ​