Replacing DeSean: The other guys, but mostly, a draft pick

Replacing DeSean: The other guys, but mostly, a draft pick

82 receptions, 1,332 yards receiving, nine touchdowns; that’s what the Philadelphia Eagles must replace in the NFL’s No. 2 offense after the release of DeSean Jackson. Where’s it supposed to come from? Not necessarily from any one player. In this four part series, we examine whose roles will increase as a result of the move. [ Part 1: Jeremy Maclin ] [ Part 2: Darren Sproles ] [ Part 3: Zach Ertz ]

From a sheer production standpoint, it would seem the Eagles have more than enough offensive talent to sustain the loss of Jackson.

A healthy Jeremy Maclin should be able to put up similar numbers or close to Jackson taking over the three-time Pro Bowler’s role in Chip Kelly’s offense. Darren Sproles adds 60-70 receptions, plus brings the added dimension of unpredictability being able to line up in either the backfield or the slot on any given play. Zach Ertz appears to be in line for a breakout season as well, perhaps even pushing 1,000 yards and/or double-digit touchdowns this year.

That being said, there’s no denying the Eagles are suddenly very thin at wide receiver specifically. There’s no clear-cut No. 3 on the roster right now behind Maclin and Riley Cooper, and that’s not even accounting for what will happen if one of those two gets hurt.

Note the use of the word “thin” though, not “devoid.” There are a couple of in-house candidates for that third wideout spot in veterans Arrelious Benn and Brad Smith.

I don’t hold very high hopes for Benn myself, but not for any lack of ability. A second-round pick of the Tampa Bay Bucs in 2010, the 25-year-old has had a hell of a time staying on the field. He missed all of last season—his first as an Eagle—with a torn ACL, and played sparingly in eight games due to injuries in ’12.

Prior to the last two injury-plagued seasons, Benn flashed some potential as a legitimate threat in the aerial attack. The Illinois product posted 55 receptions for 836 yards and five touchdowns in 29 games over his first two seasons, in some constipated offenses I might add.

The Birds were obviously holding out some hope they might be able to develop Benn into something more, trading a sixth-round pick to Tampa last year and quickly signing him to an extension. At 6’2”, 220 pounds with 4.42 speed, the potential is certainly there. If Benn could only stay healthy, he could easily be in the Eagles’ plans for this season.

Philly fans got a small taste of what Smith can bring to the offense in ‘13. Signed away from the Buffalo Bills midway through last season, it was far too late in the year to have a huge role in the offense. Smith contributed on special teams though, while Kelly found ways to utilize Smith’s unique skillset.

Mostly, that meant gadget plays. Formerly a quarterback at the University of Missouri, the veteran wide receiver/running back lined up in the backfield and took snaps out of the shotgun a few times. These plays weren’t greeted with much success, yet it was still another wrinkle defenses have to be concerned about.

Listed as a receiver, Smith actually has more rushing attempts (134) than receptions (103) for his eight-year career. You wonder about there being some duality with his and Sproles’ roles in the offense moving forward. Then again, I’m not sure a team can ever have too many players who can play multiple positions.

Either Benn or Smith or a combination of the two could legitimately fill that No. 3 receiver spot if everything works out just right—especially considering Sproles will see some time there as well and more two-tight end sets are likely in Ertz’s second season.

Obviously, the Eagles aren’t going to leave it at that though.

It’s no secret Philadelphia will take a wide receiver at some point in the upcoming draft, perhaps even as high as the No. 22 pick overall. Contrary to popular opinion, the front office doesn’t necessarily need to address the position in the first round—in this exceptionally deep class, starting-caliber talent could be available as late as the third or fourth.

I mean, after all, even Jackson wasn’t a first-round pick.

General manager Howie Roseman told Reuben Frank for CSNPhilly.com back in February there would be a receiver the team liked available in every round.

Whoever this mystery rookie is, no matter what round he’s taken, the good news is there won’t be as much pressure as some might think to make an immediate contribution in the offense. There is plenty of competition for that WR3 spot, while more Sproles and Ertz will lessen the number of snaps for that role.

Last season, Jason Avant was in the game roughly 75 percent of the time when the Birds were on offense. The frequency with which Kelly uses 11 personnel naturally is going to decrease.

A rookie wide receiver might be pressed into a bigger role in the event something happens to Maclin or Cooper, or if the kid is just that good. His is likely to be mainly a situational spot in this offense for 2014 though, which would be fine.

With so many other talented players seemingly ready to step up and take over some of Jackson’s production in the offense, there doesn’t have to be this overwhelming sense of urgency to develop a new star to replace him from day one. Consider whatever the Eagles get from their No. 3 wide receiver this year a bonus.

Alec Asher lone bright spot as Phillies continue to limp to finish with another loss to Mets

Alec Asher lone bright spot as Phillies continue to limp to finish with another loss to Mets

The Phillies returned home from a bad road trip Friday with only three games to play and the only thing to play for being the role of spoilers.

With the New York Mets in town looking to put a stranglehold on a wildcard spot, the Phillies, as another losing season finishes out, could be a thorn in the side of their rivals.

Alec Asher looked like he was playing the part of spoiler, retiring the first 11 batters he faced, but the Mets rallied, got behind starter Robert Gsellman, and turned back any Phillies sabotaging on this night, beating the home team, 5-1.

The two teams are heading in quite opposite directions.

The Mets, with their win, clinched at least a tiebreaker in the wildcard and guaranteed their season not ending on Sunday, the league’s final regular season date.

The Phillies on the other hand… 

“We’re certainly limping home,” said manager Pete Mackanin an hour or so after being ejected for the first time this year. “Not playing well, not swinging the bats very well.”

They struck out 14 times Friday night. And after scraping a run across in the second inning, never really looked like they were in the game at the plate.

Mackanin's ejection came in the eighth inning. Mackanin wasn’t happy with first base umpire Will Little and was thrown out of a game. Reliever Michael Mariot threw a fastball in on Yoenis Cespedes and Cespedes appeared to lose control of the bat through the strike zone. When appealed to, Little ruled Cespedes did not swing, and out came Mackanin.

"I had to get thrown out there," Mackanin said.

Perhaps he just couldn't stand to watch anymore. 

Gsellman battled through some early struggles and stymied the Phillies’ offense. Gsellman turned in six innings of one-run baseball, improving to 4-2 on the year. He allowed one run on seven hits and struck out seven.

Asher, in his last start of 2016, was the lone bright spot on this night.

With two outs in the fourth, his brief perfect game bid was ended with a single from Yoenis Cespedes. That was followed by another from Curtis Granderson. 

Jay Bruce then worked a full count but Asher couldn’t put him away. On the ninth pitch of the at-bat, Bruce singled home Cespedes to tie the score. 

A fourth consecutive single, this time off the bat of T.J. Rivera, allowed Granderson to cross the plate for a 2-1 Mets lead.

Asher’s night and season ended with a Bruce home run - his third in as many games - to lead off the top of the seventh.

“I wanted to go sinker away and just kind of got it mid-thigh belt,” Asher said. “He took advantage of the mistake.”

Asher, 24, went six-plus innings Friday, throwing 104 pitches while allowing three runs on five hits. He struck out four and walked zero.

His 2016 finishes with a 2.28 ERA and 0.94 WHIP in 27 ⅔ innings pitched. He struck out 13 and walked four.

“Last year when Asher was here I recall being asked if it was a smart thing to do because he got rocked so badly,” Mackanin said. “We talked about if and when he did get back to the big leagues if he would be able to handle it. What kind of make up he had. Certainly he made an adjustment. Added a two-seam fastball which he never had. Has a plus changeup. He needs a little more work on his breaking ball, but nevertheless he’s pitched well since he’s been back. He’s done a good job.”

The Phillies bullpen hasn’t lately.

Mariot, in relief of Asher, gave up two runs in 1 ⅔ innings of relief, including Bruce’s third RBI of the night to give the Mets a 5-1 lead.

The Phillies offense then went quietly into the fall night. The Mets didn’t allow a hit from the final 12 Phillies hitters.

Their season will continue beyond Sunday.

“It’s step one of a bigger accomplishment,” said Mets manager Terry Collins. “We’re certainly pleased we get to play past Sunday.”

The Phillies are just limping.

Orthopedist on Ben Simmons' injury: 'The prognosis is good'

Orthopedist on Ben Simmons' injury: 'The prognosis is good'

On Friday, Sixers fans got some bad news when the team revealed that No. 1 overall pick Ben Simmons fractured the fifth metatarsal in his right foot.

The Sixers didn't give a timetable for his return, saying that they were reviewing treatment options for the 6-foot-10 point-forward.

As a guest on CSNPhilly's Sportsnet Central, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Mark Schwartz gave a little insight into Simmons' injury. Schwartz is not treating Simmons, but has dealt with similar injuries. Schwartz believes the prognosis is good for the Sixers' rookie.

"The big question is where the exact location of this fracture is," Schwartz said. "That will dictate the prognosis and the treatment. If it's at the base of the fifth metatarsal, it's usually a non-surgical treatment. It's usually a cast/boot for six to eight weeks and return to play somewhere around eight weeks."

That would be great news considering Sixers fans didn't get to see Nerlens Noel the year he was drafted and are still awaiting the debut of 2014 draft pick Joel Embiid. 

Schwartz warns that the injury could be something known as a Jones fracture, which would likely require surgery and the recovery could be three to four months. The prognosis would still be good, according to Schwartz, but other NBA players have had lengthy recoveries with a similar injury.

"The prognosis is still good, but we know that Kevin Durant had a Jones fracture and he was out for an entire season because of it not healing," Schwartz said. "But the prognosis is good, however, the question is whether it's going to require surgery or not."

For more from Schwartz on Simmons' injury and possible timetable, check out the video above.