Science Cheerleader Darlene Cavalier Talks Science Literacy, Poker with Michael Jordan

Science Cheerleader Darlene Cavalier Talks Science Literacy, Poker with Michael Jordan

This is a guest post from Christopher Wink, a co-founder of
Technically Philly, an online news startup that covers technology and
innovation in Philadelphia and is nearly as much fun as cheerleaders.

I
wonder if Darlene Cavalier was as interested in science back in 1992
when Armon Gilliam got her into both post-fight parties after the
much-hyped Holyfield-Holmes bout in Las Vegas.

Because now, the
former 76ers cheerleader, with a Master's degree from the University of
Pennsylvania in science policy, is becoming a fairly vocal advocate for
a science literacy movement. Earlier this month, Science Cheerleader,
the year-old online home for that proposed movement, launched its Brain Makeover initiative, 18 videos highlighting fundamentals of the scientific world you should know.

The
40-year-old Society Hill beauty, who was also a member of Temple
University's cheer squad in the early 1990s, says that most adults
don't know even those basics.

Those 18 concepts were based on
research from George Mason University physics professor James Trefil,
but seeing a better way to bring in new viewers, the videos featured
curret buxom, pom-pom-toting Sixers dancers. That'll bring traffic.

Bridging the sports wonder of The700Level and the scientific curiosity
of Technically Philly, we spoke with Cavalier about the future of
Science Cheerleader, the risk of sexuality in education and her best
stories from three years as a professional cheerleader.

How did Science Cheerleader come about?

The
blog started out as a an idea to share and promote the ideas from a
book I was working on about engagement in science policy. It really
started with a piece I wrote for the Inquirer
about a science debate that wasn't, because voters didn't know it was
happening. The 'Science Cheerleader' title was the brainchild of a a Steve Grasse from Gyro Advertising. A year ago, I started the site to write
the book, and then started
getting paid speaking engagements. It was about all these ideas for
saying 'science is important,' and wanting to give people a way to
participate and learn and know what to learn and why they should learn
it. I'm really passionate about this, about science, and, after,
really, hiding my time as a cheerleader from my colleagues, I found
that I could be the science cheerleader.

OK, why not give us some good stories about being an NBA cheerleader. Please name drop, and feel free to wildly tie science
in there.

I played poker against Michael Jordan one evening. I lost.... I was friends with a close college [and] golf buddy of MJ's, and he invited me
to play poker with him, MJ, and MJ's dad -- who was there but didn't
play -- just the four of us. [I'm] happy to report that not one person even so
much as hinted that it was strip poker. No funny stuff, but
man that was fun.

On at least
one occasion following a game, Charles Barkley held open the hatchback
of my car so I could climb through because climbing through the back
was the only way to enter the wretched clunker. During
the starting line up at one game, the year I was captain, my lost
hairbrush flew out of my pompom right onto the center of the court. One of the
cheerleaders married an assistant coach [who was the] son of the head coach -- although
we were banned from dating players, the front office neglected to
include staff in that clause. Armon Gilliam helped my friend and I gain access to both Holyfield's and Holmes' post fight parties in Vegas. I never crossed any lines with the players -- people may be wondering.
However, my
future husband had season-tickets in the 2nd row so if a 700-level fan
wants to marry an Eagles cheerleader, invest in better seats. Our
dressing room was ridiculously small, kind of gross and thick with
hairspray fumes. I still keep in touch with Howard Eskin. Back then,
Bridget Foy's on South Street was where some of the players, staff and
cheerleaders hung out after home games.

I cheered
at the Vet [for the] football season [of the] Temple Owls, and I traveled all over with the
awesome Temple basketball team back in the days of Mark Macon.

With the
vantage point that I had on the court, I noticed that the players
seemed to know whether a foul shout was good or not before the fans did
-- a split second difference in cheers or jeers. Sometimes, they'd lean
in
to prepare to pat the shooter on the rear before the ball went in the
basket. Last year, I came across this interesting Scientific American post on why players might have an advantage over non players in
predicting the accuracy of basketball tosses. See, science is everywhere, even in the pinkies of NBA players.

So what is Brain Makeover?
It's just one way we want to
use to reach out and bring in new audiences. Using the Sixers
cheerleaders can attract attention and eyeballs, which is what we want,
but this will be just one thing we'll do to increase knowledge and
interest and interaction with science.

So the word is you reached an agreement with Hugh Douglas to shoot a video. How did that happen?

Another
former 76ers cheerleader now works at NFL Films, and is pretty bright
herself, and so I told her to keep her ears out for any possible
partnerships or any players who might be interested. She mentioned it
to Hugh Douglas who was really interested, and she gave me his cell
phone number and we started talking from there. 

In high school, us stat-heads and geeks took solace in thinking we
were smart. You keep showing hot science nuts -- former and current
cheerleaders, professors and now a science interested defensive end.
What gives?

I'd love to know who started the long-running rumor
that science, math and engineering are for geeks and that good-looking
people can't be taken seriously. Have you ever seen Philadelphia Inquirer's
talented science reporter, Faye Flam? Hot, hot, hot physics major from
California Institute of Technology. And wait until you see my interview
with Hugh Douglas. That guy knows science. The women, and forth-coming
men, featured on the Sexy Scientists and Engineers Flickr page on my
site are formally trained scientists and engineers. I am not a
scientist but does that mean I can't learn some important fundamentals,
become science literate, and participate in science activities and
science policy discussions? I'll answer that. Nope. And there are
millions of people like me in the U.S.

Does the sexuality devalue the learning?
The cheerleaders are just one part. It's rare that Fox national news and the Chronicle of Higher Education [and the Toronto Star] are going to run the same story at the same time. But, you know, they
did. It's because this is something people are struggling with and they
have for a long time. This is what works in America. We need to do
everything we can to bring people into this learning. It's getting
attraction from eyeballs that wouldn't
turn to a science Web site otherwise, and that's good, no matter what.
So we'll keep doing what works to educate people about science, its
policy and anything that it involves.

Christopher
Wink is a co-founder of Technically Philly, a news site that covers
technology and innovation in Philadelphia. Read more of the interview
here
.

Instant Replay: Pirates 5, Phillies 4

Instant Replay: Pirates 5, Phillies 4

BOX SCORE

PITTSBURGH --- Pinch hitter Adam Frazier’s first career home run, a leadoff shot in the seventh inning off fellow rookie Edubray Ramos, lifted the Pittsburgh Pirates to a 5-4 victory over the Phillies on Sunday afternoon at PNC Park.

It was also the first home run allowed by Ramos (1-1) in 14 career relief appearances.

The Pirates tied it at 4-4 an inning earlier when Matt Joyce hit a two-run home run off starter Vince Velasquez.

The Phillies wound up losing two of three in the series after rookie right-hander Zach Eflin pitched a three-hit shutout on Friday night. They are 3-7 since the All-Star break to fall 10 games under .500 at 45-55.

Cesar Hernandez had three hits for the Phillies while Andres Blanco and Odubel Herrera hit solo home runs off Pirates rookie right-hander Jameson Taillon.

Pirates left fielder Starling Marte also had three hits. Neftali Feliz (4-0) pitched a scoreless seventh inning for the win and Mark Melancon worked a 1-2-3 ninth for his 30th save.

Blanco suffered a fractured left index finger in the fifth inning when the veteran utility infielder was spiked on the hand by Pirates right fielder Gregory Polanco in a play at third base. He is expected to be placed on the 15-day disabled list Monday (see story).

Blanco was making his second straight start at third in place of Maikel Franco, who was out with a sore left wrist after being hit by a pitch Friday from Pirates right-hander Gerrit Cole.

Franco took over at third for Blanco, who is hitting .271 with four homers in 75 games this season.

Meanwhile, catcher Cameron Rupp was not in the lineup after being hit in the left ear flap of his batting helmet on Saturday by a pitch from Pirates rookie right-hander Tyler Glasnow. Carlos Ruiz started behind the plate.

Rupp passed Major League Baseball’s concussion protocol both Saturday and Sunday and will likely play Monday night in the opener of a three-game series against the Marlins at Miami.

The game was delayed for one hour and 32 minutes in the bottom of the eighth inning.

Starting pitching report
Velasquez had his worst of his five starts since coming off the disabled list June 26, though he did not factor in the decision. He allowed four runs and seven hits in six innings while walking four and striking out five.

Velasquez threw 107 pitches, 64 for strikes.

In his first four outings after begin activated, he was 3-0 with a 1.88 ERA to raise his record to 8-2.

At the plate
Hernandez was moved to the leadoff spot of the batting order to replace slumping right fielder Peter Bourjos and responded by going 3-for-5 with a triple.

Herrera’s home run led off the sixth and was his 11th of the season, giving the Phillies a short-lived 4-2 lead. Herrera went 7-for-13 in the series after going 4-for-41 in his previous 11 games.

First baseman Ryan Howard went 2-for-3, lifting his batting average to .166, before being pinch hit for in the eighth inning.

Left fielder Cody Asche was 0-for-4 with three strikeouts, the last coming to end the eighth inning with two runners on base and the Phillies trailing by a run.

Up next
The Phillies open a three-game series against the Marlins on Monday night at Miami.

Monday night --- RHP Jeremy Hellickson (7-7, 3.84) vs. RHP Jarred Cosart (0-1, 7.98)

Tuesday night --- RHP Jerad Eickhoff (6-11, 3.98) vs. RHP Tom Koehler (7-8, 4.42)

Wednesday afternoon --- RHP Zach Eflin (3-3, 3.40) vs. LHP Adam Conley (6-5, 3.58)

Crash kills Nebraska punter, former Michigan State punter

usa-sam-foltz.jpg
USA Today Images

Crash kills Nebraska punter, former Michigan State punter

WAUKESHA, Wis. -- Nebraska punter Sam Foltz and former Michigan State punter Mike Sadler have died in a car crash in Wisconsin after working at a kicking clinic, a sheriff's department official said Sunday. LSU kicker Colby Delahoussaye was injured in the crash.

Waukesha County Sheriff's Lt. Thom Moerman said speed was likely a factor in the single-vehicle crash that happened around 11:45 p.m. Saturday.

The 24-year-old Sadler, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, was driving. He and 22-year-old Foltz, of Greeley, Nebraska, both died at the scene. Delahoussaye, 21 of New Iberia, Louisiana, was also a passenger. He was treated at Waukesha Memorial Hospital and released. A statement from LSU said his injuries were minor and that he was scheduled to return home Monday.

Moerman said in a statement that Sadler lost control on the wet pavement, left the roadway and struck a tree.

The University of Nebraska said Sunday the team will skip this week's planned Big Ten media days in Chicago because of Foltz's death. Officials with Michigan State didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

Foltz was a three-year starter for the Nebraska team and last year he was named the Big Ten's punter of the year. Foltz graduated from Nebraska with a degree in agronomy in May. He led the Big Ten in punting last year at 44.2 yards per kick and ranked fifth in school history (42.6).

Nebraska Coach Mike Riley said Foltz was respected on the team, and had a positive influence on everyone he interacted with.

"The young men in our football program are hurting but I know that their strength of character and resolve will bring us together and we will honor Sam every day moving forward," Riley said.

Several hundred friends and teammates of Foltz gathered outside Memorial Stadium in Lincoln Sunday afternoon to remember him. Several players talked about how hard Foltz' worked and his faith in God.

"Sam was a kind and thoughtful young man who was a leader on the playing field, in the classroom, and in his community," Nebraska Chancellor Ronnie D. Green said in a statement. "He was an exemplary student-athlete who grew as a player and as a person on his path to recent completion of his degree in agronomy from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and anyone who knew him can testify that he had an enduring influence on those around him."

Sadler was a four-year starter and four-time academic All-American at Michigan State. He finished his college playing career after the 2014 season. He drew something of a cult following during his playing days because of his sense of humor and wit.

"I just asked my waitress what sport she thought I played. Her answer? Disk golf. Time to reevaluate my life," Sadler once tweeted.

He helped get his own mock Heisman Trophy candidacy rolling one season by pushing the hashtag (hash)sadler4heisman. He would also regularly exchange funny lines on Twitter with the (at)FauxPelini account, a popular parody of the former Nebraska and current Youngstown State coach Bo Pelini.

"Mike impacted so many people not only as a football player, but also from an academic standpoint and in the community as well," Michigan State coach Mark Dantonio said in a statement. "The world has lost a rising star who dreamed big and was accomplishing those dreams, one after another. He was one of those people that brightened your day."

Dan Tracy with Kohl's Kicking said both Sadler and Foltz had been working at a weekend clinic at the camp in Wisconsin. Tracy said the camp ended early Sunday after an announcement about the deaths.

A statement from kicking camp director Jamie Kohl said the staff was mourning with the players' families and football programs.

"We mourn today with all of the people who were better men and women for knowing Sam and Mike," Kohl said. "Our thoughts and prayers are with them."

Andres Blanco fractures left index finger, likely heading to 15-day DL

Andres Blanco fractures left index finger, likely heading to 15-day DL

PITTSBURGH --- Utility infielder Andres Blanco suffered a fractured left index finger in the fifth inning of Sunday’s game against the Pittsburgh Pirates and is expected to be placed on the 15-day disabled list Monday.

Blanco was injured when Pirates right fielder Gregory Polanco slid into his hand during a play at third base. Blanco was making his second straight start at third in place of Maikel Franco, who was out with a sore left wrist after being hit by a pitch Friday from Pirates right-hander Gerrit Cole.

Franco took over at third for Blanco, who hit a solo home run off Pirates rookie right-hander Jameson Taillon in the first inning. Blanco is hitting .271 with four homers in 75 games this season.

Meanwhile, catcher Cameron Rupp was not in the lineup after being hit in the left ear flap of his batting helmet on Saturday by a pitch from Pirates rookie right-hander Tyler Glasnow. Carlos Ruiz started behind the plate.

Rupp passed Major League Baseball’s concussion protocol both Saturday and Sunday.

"If you get hit in the head, you probably want to take a little bit more precaution than if it was another part of your body,” Rupp said.