The Fightins: Flyers Quotes After the Battle With Ottawa

The Fightins: Flyers Quotes After the Battle With Ottawa

The Flyers were naturally somewhat upbeat after their 6-2 fight-filled win over the Senators at home last night, marking their eighth win in nine games since the new year started. And, just as naturally, a lot of the questions being asked by the reporters in the locker room focused on the five third period fights that will be the most memorable part of the game. Intentionally or not, some the quotes they got out of the Flyers were pretty hilarious. 

Claude Giroux was one of two entirely surprising combatants in this one, and we'll get this post started with what he had to say about throwing down:

Why so many fights in this one?
"Oh there were a couple hits and I don't know, the fans like it and it's a good time."

How many fights did you have?

"Maybe eight or ten. I don't really fight. When I get pissed off at something, I try finding the smallest guy on the other team and go fight him."

Did Carter jump in to try and defend you?

"I don't know, I'm not too sure what happened. Two guys kind of jumped me and Cartsy had to jump in. But I just felt like I had to stick up for myself."

Carter was a man of few words, but his quotes were also pretty funny:

How long had it been since you've been in a fight?
"A couple years."

Yeah, how did it feel out there?

"It was all right."

Do you remember your last one? Ryan Whitney?
It was a sleeper until the third and all those fights... why so many fights?
"I don't know."

Just felt like it?
"I wasn't doing much else out there. I figured I'd do something."

What were you thinking when you went after Winchester, was that because of two guys jumping Claude?

"Yeah, I mean you have to get in there and do something."


The captain had a great night on the ice, with two goals and two assists, but Richie wasn't among the five fighters, and he was pretty clear that he didn't want to talk about fights after the game. 

Why so many fights?
“I don’t know.  You’ll have to ask the guys who fought.”

Why didn’t you fight?
“I don’t like fighting.  I was on the bench.”

Jeff Carter doesn’t fight ever either.
“He gets a couple.  I don’t know.  He’s tough.”

It didn’t look like he had been in a fight in a while out there.
“Tell him that.”

Wellll okay then... Moving right along... (Richie's quotes on everything not related to the fights were more substantive, he was just clearly uninterested in talking about other people's fights.)

Even Sergei Bobrovsky had to answer fight questions though:

Did you hear the “goalie fight” chant at the end of the game?
“I did not hear it.”

Did you feel left out with all that fighting going on?
“Well, everyone had a couple so I don’t know where I would fit in.”

Have you ever been in a fight?


Pronger wasn't shy about answering:

Are you disappointed that you didn’t get to drop the gloves?
“Well there were an awful lot of them out there.  We answered, they were running around and we answered them.”


You know that feeling you had when you saw Claude Giroux's bare hands flying toward a helmet? Peter Laviolette was right there with ya:

Peter, what’s going through your mind, on the bench, when you see your skill guys (Claude Giroux and Jeff Carter) throwing punches?
“Probably not something you want to see on a regular basis when it comes to those guys. But you never know what every game has in store for you. Guys were pretty competitive in the third period to make sure we got a win.  It’s just the way the game happened and I thought our guys did a great job.”

 Do you worry (when you see something like that)?
 “I think you are always worried when you see something like that.  That’s part of the game; you have to take things as they come and that’s what happened tonight.  That’s the way they played.  Like I said, I think we did a good job in the third period tonight.”


For videos of the carnage and a complete recap, click here

AP Photo

Doug Pederson not afraid to get agressive with play-calling

Doug Pederson not afraid to get agressive with play-calling

Talk to Doug Pederson and he comes across … what’s a nice way to put it … dry?

Very nice guy. Very friendly. Very down to Earth. But not the most dynamic personality in public.

Which is why his personality on gameday has been so surprising.

Pederson is a risk taker as a playcaller. Aggressive and fearless.

Whether it’s going for it on fourth down with the lead, going for two after a successful PAT or throwing deep in a situation that doesn’t necessarily call for it, Pederson has proven to be the proverbial riverboat gambler that Chip Kelly was expected to be but never became.

“My personality is probably a little more conservative by nature, I think,” Pederson said Monday. “You'd probably agree with that.”

Pederson got a laugh with that comment because his public persona is exactly the opposite of his gameday demeanor.

It only took one day before we all got a taste of Pederson’s fearlessness.

In the season opener against the Browns, with the Eagles clinging to a 15-10 lead and a rookie quarterback making his first NFL appearance and a 4th-and-4 at the Browns’ 40--yard-line, he kept the offense on the field.

Carson Wentz responded by connecting with Zach Ertz on a five-yard gain to move the chains, and one play later, the Eagles took command on Wentz’s 35-yard TD pass to Nelson Agholor.

Six weeks in, the Eagles are 5 for 5 on fourth down. Only the Falcons have converted more fourth downs in the NFL this year, and they’re 6 for 10.

In the win over the Bears, the Eagles were 3 for 3 on fourth down, their best fourth-down conversion day in nine years.

This is the first time in 14 years the Eagles have converted five or more fourth downs through six games.

According to Pro Football Reference, the Eagles are one of only seven teams in NFL history to attempt five or more fourth down plays through six games and still be at 100 percent. The Lions are also 5 for 5 this year.

Pederson said analytics are a big part of his decision-making process, but he also trusts his instincts.

“I think it's both,” Pederson said. “But I trust our guys and I trust our offensive line and I think it sends a great message to the rest of the team, to the defense and special teams, that, ‘Hey, if we can convert this and stay on the field,’ it sends a good message.

“And on the other side of that, if you do convert, (it’s about) the message you send to the other team and the fact that you're going to stay aggressive.”

The Eagles are 29th-best in the NFL on third down at just 34 percent. But they’re one of only three teams that’s at 100 percent on fourth down.

“It's kind of a crazy deal when you're not great on third down, but you can be 5 for 5 on fourth down and convert them,” Pederson said. “It's a weird deal. But credit to the guys for the execution.

“I'm going to continue to look at it. I don't ever want to be in a position that I'm going to jeopardize the team at the time (by being too aggressive). Looking at the five fourth-down decisions this year, I don’t think they put us in any harm at that time.”

Wentz is 3 for 3 for 21 yards on fourth down, with the four-yard completion to Ertz, a seven-yard first down to Jordan Matthews in the Bears game and a nine-yard to Dorial Green-Beckham, also in the win in Chicago.

He also rushed six yards for a first down on a 4th-and-2 Sunday in the win over the Vikings. The Eagles’ other fourth-down conversion this year was Ryan Mathews’ one-yard TD on a 4th-and-goal against Chicago.

Pederson said as an assistant coach under Andy Reid, he always found himself asking himself whether he would be conservative or aggressive in crucial situations.

We’re all learning the answer now.

“Yeah, you definitely put yourself in those situations, as a coordinator and a position coach,” he said. “Putting yourself in those spots, it's a lot easier when you're not making the decision obviously to go, ‘Oh, yeah, I would have not gone for it there or not gone for it there.’

“Now, being in this position, it's my tail on the line if we don't convert.”

6 months later, Cubs' Kyle Schwarber returns for World Series Game 1

6 months later, Cubs' Kyle Schwarber returns for World Series Game 1

CLEVELAND — Chicago Cubs slugger Kyle Schwarber's rehab finished just in time for the World Series.

Schwarber will bat fifth and be the designated hitter for the National League champions in Game 1 on Tuesday night against Cleveland's Corey Kluber. Schwarber hasn't played in the majors since tearing ligaments in his left knee on April 7 in a collision with teammate Dexter Fowler.

Dallas Cowboys orthopedic surgeon Dr. Daniel Cooper operated 12 days later to repair torn anterior cruciate and lateral collateral ligaments. He was expected to miss the rest of the season but was cleared to return on Oct. 17.

Schwarber played a pair of games in the Arizona Fall League, going 1 for 6 with a double and two walks, and flew to Cleveland on Monday.