The pros and cons to trading DeSean Jackson

The pros and cons to trading DeSean Jackson

One of the most polarizing athletes in this city, reports of a potential DeSean Jackson trade received a largely negative reaction across the board. Of course, many would be disappointed to see a fan favorite and one of the most productive wide receivers in the NFL shipped out by the Philadelphia Eagles. Even folks who are okay with it though mostly had to balk at the idea of only getting a third-round pick back.

The fact is if Jackson does get moved this offseason, there was probably more to this story than meets the eye. In Jimmy Kempski’s original report for—the story that started all of the speculation—one of the keys is what’s going on behind the scenes. Jackson’s attitude in the locker room, battles with coaches, and other issues we simply may not be privy to seem to be the driving forces at this point in time.

If the Eagles dump Jackson because he’s stirring the pot, I’m not sure anybody can blame them. Still, the discount price is a shock to the system, and people are having trouble understanding why the team would even consider such a low offer. Are they better off trying to gut it out with Jackson?

Maybe, maybe not. I’ve been back and forth over this issue since the news broke and can see both sides of the coin. There are perfectly good reasons to cut a deal now, and perfectly good reasons against it. Weigh the pros and cons and decide for yourself what you think is really the right move.



Ends distractions

From offseason hobbies that include producing rap videos and stunt-diving into his pool, to jawing with opponents and bickering with coaches and teammates on the football field, there is no denying Jackson tends to make headlines for the wrong reasons.

In fairness, most of Jackson’s prima donna behavior is harmless. In fact, he’s never been in legal trouble of any kind and does a ton of charity work. However, it says a lot that his Philadelphia home was robbed in January, and all fans and reporters can seem to do is suggest it somehow reflects negatively on him.

The real issue though is Jackson’s ability to become a malcontent at any given time. He was caught in a public dispute with his wide receivers coach against the Minnesota Vikings last season, and Kempski notes that’s not out of the ordinary. It’s not just this coaching staff he’s clashed with, either. In 2011, Andy Reid benched Jackson for a game for missing a meeting. These types of actions can’t be overlooked, and seem to be the main motivators for a trade.

Deep draft

At first, I was a little taken aback like everybody else by reports that a third-round pick might be as high as teams are willing to go for Jackson—and that the Eagles would actually consider this no less. If that’s all they can get in return, why not at least wait and see if something better eventually comes along?

Then I remembered that this is an especially deep draft. If the Eagles can either get a third-round pick this year or next year, you would absolutely want them to have it in ’14.

A record number of underclassmen have entered the talent pool, so the chances of finding a starting-caliber player in the third are better than most drafts. If the Birds could finagle another mid-round pick in the trade too—say the fifth they shipped away for Darren Sproles—they could wind up with a couple quality players, whereas next year, maybe not so much.

Avoid certain contract squabble

While Jackson’s stated desire for a renegotiated contract was blown out of proportion, and the receiver denied any problems would arise in year three of the five-year deal he signed, it could certainly become a battleground down the road. As much as fans won’t like to hear it, he does have a point about there being no more guaranteed money in the current pact, a commitment he rightfully feels he’s earned.

It’s not entirely uncommon for parties to review contracts with two-years remaining in the NFL, so Jackson will want to talk for sure next offseason, particularly if he continues to produce. The problem is the Eagles probably aren’t excited about the prospect of extending a player who will be 30 when his current deal is scheduled to be up.

If the front office is still unwilling to do something for Jackson next year, you can bet your ass he’s going to make some noise at that point. Remember how he acted in 2011? Yeah, the team screwed him over then, and you could argue they would be screwing him over now. Regardless, do you want to deal with that again in ’15 while this team is trying to make a Super Bowl run?

Eagles ensure they get something in return

The Eagles could wait and see how things go with Jackson and trade him down the road if things aren’t working out for whatever reason, but that plan could also backfire. What if he gets injured or his play declines?

Worse, what if Jackson has a meltdown over his contract situation in the meantime and reduces his value even further? Or worse yet, the situation becomes so untenable, the Eagles would have to cut him anyway if they can’t make a swap, so potential suitors decide to wait it out and they get nothing in return?

By getting a deal done right now, this offseason, the Eagles would ensure that at least they got something back on their investment before things go downhill.  Considering the player we are talking about, you have to agree it a strong possibility.



Loss of highly-productive player

The most clear-cut drawback to trading DeSean Jackson is, well, the Eagles would no longer have DeSean Jackson, a 27-year-old, three-time Pro Bowler.

I’m honestly not sure if everybody in this fan base fully appreciates what this guy does on the football field. Since Jackson came into the league in 2008, he is one of only nine wide receivers with at least 350 receptions, 6,000 yards and 35 touchdowns. Think about that for a moment. Statistically, he’s a top-10 receiver.

Aside from the numbers, Jackson forces opponents to account for his speed. When defenses are essentially double-covering No. 10 or pushing their safeties 20 yards deep at the snap, that creates a domino effect that opens up space for LeSean McCoy, Jeremy Maclin, Riley Cooper and the rest of the offense. Clearly, he would be a huge loss.

Third-round pick is so little

Obviously, we don’t know for a fact the most Jackson would fetch in a trade is a third-round pick. However, if Derrick Gunn’s report for CSN is accurate and the Eagles have had trouble garnering interest even at that price, you certainly have to at least wonder why they would even bother.

Ideally, the team would get at least a first for a highly-productive 27-year-old player in his prime. In Jackson’s case, given all the extra baggage, I can understand why the bidding would start with a second instead. But a third, that just seems like a slap in the face and teams trying to take advantage of the situation.

No player is ever truly untouchable if the price is right. In this case, clearly it’s not.

$6 million in dead money

One reason I thought the Eagles might wait one more year to pull the trigger on any moves involving Jackson is his contract. Sure, the organization can save $6.5 million under the cap if they get this guy off their books. However, the other $6 million—almost half of his salary in ‘14—will convert to dead money against the cap if he’s traded.

The dead money comes from a prorated $10 million signing bonus that’s spread over the life of the contract. With each passing year, the dead money decreases by $2 million, so if the Birds wait until next year, it would be $4 million in dead money.

It’s not enough to prevent the Eagles from moving Jackson, especially because ultimately they’re still saving in the end. However, it’s usually more favorable from a business standpoint when you get something for your money, which is why it’s a little surprising this organization would be so willing to eat that much to be rid of him.

Wide receiver goes from strength to question mark

The biggest concern of all is without a doubt the instability a trade would create at the wide receiver position. Jeremy Maclin is probably capable of being a No. 1 receiver in this league, but he’s coming off of a torn ACL and will be playing on a one-year deal. Riley Cooper might be an adequate No. 2, but has limited ability and is a likely candidate for regression in ’14.

The Eagles will obviously draft a wide receiver as well whether Jackson is traded this offseason or not, but we all know how that works. There’s no guarantee that player will pan out, and certainly is an unreliable option in his rookie year if nothing else.

I’m perfectly alright with trading Jackson, in fact I theorized this could happen myself before the story blew up—only next year, when some of these questions are answered. Maclin, Cooper and a player from this draft sounds like a fine combo to me, but it’s predicated on everything working out according to plan. How often does that happen?

I think the most preferable situation might be Jackson plays out this year while the Eagles get their ducks in a row at the position, then they take what they can get next offseason. However, given the quality of this draft and the likelihood that strategy blows up in their face, it would be hard to blame them for striking while the iron is hot.

If the Birds could get at least a second for Jackson right now, a trade is a no-brainer. With all we know however—and all we don’t—I’m not so sure they shouldn’t just settle for the best package they are offered before the draft.

Aaron Rodgers tosses 3 TDs to help Packers pull away from Bears

Aaron Rodgers tosses 3 TDs to help Packers pull away from Bears


GREEN BAY, Wis. -- Aaron Rodgers set a record. The Chicago Bears lost another quarterback.

After a slow start in the red zone, the Green Bay Packers picked up the pace in the second half to overpower their offensively-challenged NFC North rivals.

Rodgers threw for 326 yards and three touchdowns, Davante Adams and Ty Montgomery emerged as playmakers in the second half and Packers beat the Bears 26-10 on Thursday night.

Rodgers was 39 of 56, setting a franchise mark for completions in a game. It was the Packers' first contest without injured running back Eddie Lacy .

"A lot of moving parts, a very satisfying victory at home," coach Mike McCarthy said.

The Packers (4-2) moved effectively on short gains most of the night, but couldn't break into the end zone until Adams caught the first of his two touchdown receptions with 9:11 left in the third quarter for a 13-10 lead.

Rodgers and Adams combined again for a 4-yard score on the first play of fourth quarter for a 10-point lead.

The Bears (1-6) lost quarterback Brian Hoyer to a broken left arm in the second quarter. With Jay Cutler already out with a right thumb injury, Chicago turned to third-stringer Matt Barkley.

An offense that was already 31st in the league in scoring got worse. Barkley was 6 of 15 for 81 yards and two interceptions.

"Well, when you lose your starting quarterback it can be disruptive," Bears coach John Fox said. "It's not an excuse, it's just a reality,"

He tried to lean on the rush against the NFL's third-best run defense. It didn't work either.

Kadeem Carey had 48 yards on 10 carries, including a 24-yarder. Receiver Alshon Jeffery was held to three catches for 33 yards against a Packers secondary without its top three cornerbacks because of injuries.

It got so bad for the Bears that Rodgers had more completions (37) than the Bears had offensive plays (36) by 5:31 of the fourth quarter.

That 37th completion for Rodgers was a 2-yard touchdown pass to Randall Cobb for a 16-point lead.

Adams, Montgomery and Cobb each finished with at least 10 receptions.

Hoyer hurt
Hoyer left early in the second quarter after getting hit by Julius Peppers and Clay Matthews on an incompletion on third-and-6 from midfield. The right-handed Hoyer looked as if he landed on his left arm . He was attended to by trainers on the field for a couple minutes before going to the locker room. Hoyer was 4 of 11 for 49 yards.

Triple threat
Adams had 13 catches for a career-high 132 yards, making Jordy Nelson-like moves to spin out of tackles for extra yards. Adams had just been cleared earlier Thursday from the NFL's concussion protocol after leaving the loss Sunday to Dallas.

Cobb finished with 11 catches for 95 yards.

Montgomery, who got the start in the backfield with running backs Lacy (ankle) and James Starks (knee) out, finished with 10 catches for 66 yards, and nine carries for 60 yards.

"You do what you have to do, you play the way you have to play," McCarthy said.

Big Floyd
The Bears' only touchdown came from rookie pass-rushing linebacker Leonard Floyd, who forced Rodgers to fumble on third-and-10 from the 15 on a sack. Floyd recovered the ball in the end zone for a 10-6 lead, 30 seconds into the third quarter.

Floyd had been limited in practice this week with a calf injury.

"He's got those kind of abilities. It's been problematic a little bit having him out there, but it was good to have him back out there tonight," Fox said.

The Packers scored touchdowns on their next three drives.

Slow start
The Packers moved effectively with short passes in the first half but stalled on three drives inside the 22. Mason Crosby salvaged two series with field goals, but the Packers went scoreless on another drive when Montgomery was stopped on a fourth-and-goal run from the 1.

Green Bay, which led 6-3 at the half, exploited the Bears' underneath coverage. They also threw short passes as a substitute for the running game.

"It means we threw it a lot. But a lot of times records like these are achieved in losses when you're way behind," Rodgers about his completions record.

Injury report
Bears: Besides Hoyer, RG Kyle Long left in the second quarter with an arm injury.

Packers: RB Don Jackson, who was just activated from the practice squad Thursday to replace Lacy, left in the first quarter with a hand injury.

MLB Playoffs: Cubs beat Dodgers, move one win away from World Series

MLB Playoffs: Cubs beat Dodgers, move one win away from World Series


LOS ANGELES -- One win away. Two chances at home. Seven decades of waiting.

The Chicago Cubs closed in on their first World Series trip since 1945 by beating the Los Angeles Dodgers 8-4 on Thursday in Game 5 of their National League playoff.

Jon Lester pitched seven sharp innings, Addison Russell hit a tiebreaking homer and the Cubs grabbed a 3-2 lead in the NL Championship Series.

On deck, a pair of opportunities to wrap up that elusive pennant at Wrigley Field.

"The city of Chicago has got to be buzzing pretty much right now," manager Joe Maddon said. "We're not going to run away from anything. It's within our reach right now."

The Cubs' first opportunity to clinch comes Saturday night in Game 6, when Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw faces major league ERA leader Kyle Hendricks.

"That's a game we expect to win," Los Angeles manager Dave Roberts said.

Of course, the Cubs were in the same favorable position 13 years ago -- heading home to Wrigley with a 3-2 lead in the NLCS.

But even with ace pitchers Mark Prior and Kerry Wood starting the final two games, Chicago collapsed against the Marlins in one of its most excruciating failures.

More than a decade later, the franchise is still chasing its first World Series championship since 1908.

"We've heard the history," center fielder Dexter Fowler said, "but at the same time we're trying to make history."

Budding star Javier Baez was in the middle of everything for the Cubs, a common theme this October. The second baseman made a sensational defensive play when the game was still close in the seventh, and his three-run double capped a five-run eighth that made it 8-1.

After busting out of his postseason slump Wednesday, Russell hit a two-run homer for the second straight game. This one was a sixth-inning drive off losing pitcher Joe Blanton that gave Chicago a 3-1 lead.

"Just rounding the bases, it was pretty exciting," Russell said. "Pumped up, not only for myself but for the team and that little cushion that Jonny had to go forward from that."

Baez had three of Chicago's 13 hits, matching the team's total in Game 4, when the Cubs snapped a 21-inning scoreless streak and won 10-2.

Lester allowed one run and five hits, improving to 2-0 in three playoff starts this year. He has given up two runs in 21 innings.

The left-hander struck out six and walked one in a slow-paced game that lasted 4 hours, 16 minutes.

"These guys won the game for us," Lester said, nodding toward Russell and Baez. "I was just kind of along for the ride."

Anthony Rizzo's run-scoring double gave the Cubs a 1-0 lead in the first.

Los Angeles tied it in the fourth on Adrian Gonzalez's RBI groundout.

Russell homered on an 0-1 pitch from Blanton, who gave up a single to Baez leading off the sixth. Baez stole second before Russell's shot to left-center put the Cubs ahead on another unusually hot night at Dodger Stadium.

Blanton took his second loss of the series. The veteran right-hander gave up consecutive homers in the eighth inning of Game 1, including a tiebreaking grand slam by pinch-hitter Miguel Montero.

"Our confidence hasn't wavered," Roberts said. "This series certainly isn't over."

With the Dodgers trailing 3-1 in the seventh, Gonzalez found himself on the wrong end of a replay review for the second consecutive night.

With Baez playing way out on the outfield grass in shallow right, the slow-footed Gonzalez tried to take advantage with a drag bunt leading off the inning. Baez rushed in for a barehanded scoop and off-balance throw, but Gonzalez initially was called safe by first base umpire Ted Barrett. The Cubs challenged and the ruling was overturned.

In Game 4, Gonzalez was tagged out at home to end the second after diving with his left hand stretched toward the plate while catcher Willson Contreras applied a tag. The Dodgers challenged, but the video review upheld umpire Angel Hernandez's out call.

Chicago jumped on struggling Dodgers rookie Kenta Maeda from the start. Fowler singled leading off the game and scored on Rizzo's double to right two batters later.

Maeda gave up one run and three hits over 3 2/3 innings. The right-hander has allowed eight earned runs in 10 2/3 innings this postseason.

The Dodgers' defense fell apart in the eighth.

Gonzalez tried flipping Russell's slow roller to reliever Pedro Baez, who came over to cover first and bobbled the ball for an error.

Contreras followed with a pinch-hit single, and the runners moved up on pinch-hitter Albert Almora Jr.'s sacrifice bunt. Fowler reached on an infield single to first, with Gonzalez losing a foot race when Fowler slid into the bag as Russell scored.

Kris Bryant reached on an infield single to third, with the Dodgers unsuccessfully challenging the call that he was safe.

The Dodgers thought they'd finally escaped the inning when Rizzo lined out to second baseman Kike Hernandez, who nearly doubled up Fowler at second. But the Cubs challenged the call and it was reversed, prolonging the inning.

Baez got yanked after walking Ben Zobrist to load the bases. Ross Stripling came on to face Baez, who doubled to deep right, driving in three more runs.

"We can grab that momentum by one name: Kershaw," Gonzalez said. "We don't want to put it all on him, but if we score a couple of runs, we'll feel real good."

Scully returns
Vin Scully was back at Dodger Stadium for the first time since ending his 67-year career behind the microphone earlier this month.

The 88-year-old Hall of Fame announcer attended as a spectator and proclaimed, "It's time for Dodger baseball!" from an upstairs suite.

Cubs outfielder Matt Szczur isn't on the NLCS roster, but he's contributing. A day after his bat was borrowed by Rizzo to hit a home run, Szczur revealed during an in-game TV interview that Russell wore a pair of his underwear leggings Wednesday after leaving his own at home.

Up next
Dodgers: Kershaw takes the mound in Chicago on an extra day of rest. The left-hander is 2-0 with a 3.72 ERA in three starts and one relief appearance this postseason. Overall, the three-time Cy Young Award winner is 4-6 with a 4.39 ERA in 17 career playoff appearances.

Cubs: Hendricks' 2.13 ERA was tops in the majors this season. The right-hander allowed a solo homer in 5 1/3 innings of Game 2, his longest career postseason start. The Cubs lost 1-0 to Kershaw.