Writer Just Your Average Philly Columnist

Writer Just Your Average Philly Columnist

As some of you may have noticed, Inquirer columnist Frank Fitzpatrick wrote a piece on Friday titled "Morning Bytes: Blogger just your average Philly fan" which took a look at the live blogging I did for the Eagles season opener over at AOL's Fanhouse.  I felt Mr. Fitzpatrick was rather off base with many of the things he said, so I wrote him a letter:

Hey Frank,

First off, thanks for writing about me and my blog in the Inquirer.  It's always cool to see your own name in print.  I thought I'd clear some things up for you.  While I pride myself on just writing from a fans point of view, I take some offense to you saying I'm a "prototypical Philly fan" while inferring I was "quick to condemn players" and "always perched on the edge of the bandwagon, ready to leap at the drop of a pass."

I realize you've been writing about sports for the Inquirer for over a quarter of a century.  Hell, that's longer than I've been alive.  While this may give you "credentials" in some areas, it may detract from your "credentials" in other areas, namely the Internet and blogging.  I'm not sure if you really understand the concept of "live blogging" or blogging in general.  Maybe you should consult with your colleague Dan Rubin, while he, like you, may have his AARP card, he seems to "get" the idea of blogging, even if he is a few days behind the curve on some Internet phenomena.

You say "the Bird Blogger quickly revealed himself, not as the next Red Smith but as the prototypical Philly fan."  I don't think you get it.  The last thing I want to be is the next Red Smith, or even a Ray Didinger or Les Bowen (two guys I respect and admire) for that matter.  While you may still get all your info from print papers, they are no longer the only source for sports information.  There are websites and writers out there who are changing the way people watch and care about sports.  I'd rather strive to be Bill Simmons than Bill Conlin, it's just more fun being a fan.  I don't want or try to be objective.  I'm just a Philly sports fan; I'm just not prototypical.  You were close.

Now that we cleared that up, there are a few more problems with your article:

  • You comment on my criticizing Donte Stallworth for dropping a pass in the 4th quarter.  Prior to my comment, I praised Stallworth repeatedly; he had a phenomenal day.  Perhaps you didn't notice the "!@#!" after my comment or perhaps as you get older you just lose your sense of sarcasm.
  • You comment on how I stated earlier in the week that Westbrook should return punts  and how I linked to that post, like people wouldn't really believe me.  This is the Internet, linking is good.
  • Speaking of linking, you pick and choose quotes from my lengthy live blog.  What you don't do is tell your readers where they can get the full context of the quotes.  It's called a URL and you MSM types seem to dislike allowing anyone to go anywhere that isn't your own domain.  Yet you criticize bloggers who are the first to give credit where it is due.
  • You also seem to have no idea about who I am or what my credentials are.  Maybe you should try a search engine. You can find out lots of stuff on there.  I spent about 2 minutes and found out you were nominated for a Pulitzer, wrote a book about the '83 Phillies, hate badminton, and live in West Chester.
  • While I'm not claiming to have any credentials here at The700Level, AOL's Fanhouse is a network of paid bloggers.  Not just anyone can go over and talk about the wings they ate during halftime on AOL's Fanhouse.  I've done something to earn that right, even if it was while I was wearing my pajamas.
  • The live blog you quote is found on AOL's Fanhouse.  Fan + House = place for fans to say what fans think.
  • Also, I'm the biggest McNabb backer out there, I'd link you to it all, but it seems like you don't like links.

So there you go Frank, I just wanted to clear all that up for you.  And I'm probably going to start reading more of your stuff now since I know you've checked out mine.  Everybody likes to be heard.

Sincerely,
Enrico
www.the700level.com
Eagles Blogger, AOL Fanhouse

Andres Blanco fractures left index finger, likely heading to 15-day DL

Andres Blanco fractures left index finger, likely heading to 15-day DL

PITTSBURGH --- Utility infielder Andres Blanco suffered a fractured left index finger in the fifth inning of Sunday’s game against the Pittsburgh Pirates and is expected to be placed on the 15-day disabled list Monday.

Blanco was injured when Pirates right fielder Gregory Polanco slid into his hand during a play at third base. Blanco was making his second straight start at third in place of Maikel Franco, who was out with a sore left wrist after being hit by a pitch Friday from Pirates right-hander Gerrit Cole.

Franco took over at third for Blanco, who hit a solo home run off Pirates rookie right-hander Jameson Taillon in the first inning. Blanco is hitting .271 with four homers in 75 games this season.

Meanwhile, catcher Cameron Rupp was not in the lineup after being hit in the left ear flap of his batting helmet on Saturday by a pitch from Pirates rookie right-hander Tyler Glasnow. Carlos Ruiz started behind the plate.

Rupp passed Major League Baseball’s concussion protocol both Saturday and Sunday.

"If you get hit in the head, you probably want to take a little bit more precaution than if it was another part of your body,” Rupp said.

Mike Piazza inducted into Baseball Hall of Fame

Mike Piazza inducted into Baseball Hall of Fame

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. -- Mike Piazza has been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Selected by the Dodgers in the 62nd round of the 1988 amateur draft with the 1,390th pick, ahead of only five other players, Piazza is the lowest-drafted player to reach the Hall of Fame. He made it in on his fourth try.

Piazza played 16 years with five teams and hit 427 home runs, including a major-league record 396 as a catcher. A 12-time All-Star, Piazza won 10 Silver Slugger Awards and finished in the top five in MVP voting four times.

Perhaps even more impressive, Piazza had six seasons with at least 30 home runs, 100 RBIs and a .300 batting average. All other catchers in baseball history combined have posted nine such seasons.

Ken Griffey Jr. inducted into Baseball Hall of Fame

Ken Griffey Jr. inducted into Baseball Hall of Fame

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. -- Ken Griffey Jr. has been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Griffey, the first No. 1 draft pick to be selected for enshrinement, played 22 big-league seasons with the Mariners, Reds and White Sox and was selected on a record 99.32 percent of ballots cast, an affirmation of sorts for his clean performance during baseball's so-called Steroids Era.

A 13-time All-Star selection and 10-time Gold Glove Award winner, Griffey hit 630 home runs, sixth all-time, and drove in 1,836 runs.

Griffey also was the American League MVP in 1997, drove in at least 100 runs in eight seasons, and won seven Silver Slugger Awards.

In the 1995 ALDS, he became just the second player in major league history to hit five home runs in a postseason series.