The Strangest Union Goal Ever: An (Indirect) Explanation

The Strangest Union Goal Ever: An (Indirect) Explanation

One of the best things about going to Union games the last three-plus years has been meeting lots of great people who DIDN'T grow up around the game.

There are plenty of people -- including my semi-regular tailgate crew (I promise to get down there early again sometime soon, guys) -- who don't wake up at 7 a.m. for EPL games and for whom Union games are simply a great way to spend a Saturday. They got dragged to a game once, not knowing the difference between an indirect kick and a penalty kick -- and have been fans ever since.

For some at PPL Park (you know who you are), these people are a nuisance, ruining their soccer snobbery with a few uneducated questions.

For me, I've found out those people are a large segment of the audience here at The Level. So, from time to time, I'll try to break down a play, moment, or trend that might seem commonplace to a soccer-head, but drew a "WTF?" from everyone else.

There's no better place to start than with the Union's second goal last week against Chivas USA. See it for yourself.

I watched this game from my couch, and immediately saw countless "What the hell?" tweets from fans. Well, here goes:

Nearly every single whistle in soccer results in a "direct" kick. It wasn't always that way (at least not from what 14-year-old me remembers from referee classes, but I digress). Handballs, dangerous tackles, push-offs, etc., all result in a "direct" kick, which simply means the kick-taker can shoot directly on goal if he so desires. You'll often see a teammate roll or touch the ball on a free kick before it's hit, but that's simply an attempt at misdirection or to gain an extra foot of space.

There are SOME fouls that result in "indirect" kicks. This simply means that someone other than the kick-taker must touch the ball before a goal can be scored (technically, the kickoff to start halves and after goals is also an indirect kick -- as is a throw-in).

There are really only two whistles you'll ever seen in a professional game that result in an indirect kick. One is for an offside violation. But since the farthest forward that kick can ever be taken is just inside midfield (you can't be offside in your own half), the ball will always touch another player anyway. So it's a moot point.

The other is what you saw Saturday.

After a ball into the box by new signing Fabinho, Chivas' Edgar Mejia seemed to stumble on the wet grass while going for the loose ball. What his intentions were, it's hard to tell. But according to the referee, he INTENTIONALLY passed the ball back to goalie Dan Kennedy. That's the key word: Intentionally.

Passing it back to your keeper is fine. But if you do it on purpose, the goalie is not allowed to use his hands. The moment Kennedy picked up the ball, the whistle blew, and everyone was confused. Usually, players are given the benefit of the doubt on backpasses, especially in a hectic and crowded penalty area. And ESPECIALLY when Noah was preparing the ark behind the River End. In my opinion, only the most blatant backpass should be whistled in those conditions.

The catch in this situation is that unlike every other foul committed inside the box, illegal touching (::giggle::) by the goalkeeper is not a penalty kick. So the ball is placed at the spot of the foul (about seven yards out, in this case), and it must be touched before going in the net (an opposing player would also count, so in theory you could blast it off the keeper's hands and in).

On any free kick, defenders must stand 10 yards away. In this case, there aren't 10 yards to give, so all Chivas players SHOULD have been on the goal line until Sebastien Le Toux touched the ball. Clearly that didn't happen, but it didn't much matter.

Once Le Toux touched the ball, it's fair game (if I remember from my reffing classes, it is supposed to roll one full rotation). And to his credit, Michael Farfan -- who I have been critical of this season -- perfectly placed a shot that is MUCH harder than he made it look.

It's the kind of goal you likely won't see again for a long, long time, and one of the most bizarre plays in the sport. Chivas USA fans (if they really exist) have every right to be apoplectic about the call that led to the kick. But if you're a Union fan, three points is three points.

Oh, and judging by the forecast, we could see even more biblical rain during Saturday's game against Portland. So maybe things will get weird yet again. (Jack McInerney will be eligible after being released from national team duty Wednesday night. He did not appear in three group games for Jurgen Klinsmann.)

The Rockies Twitter account tweeted whole game in 'Rocky' quotes

The Rockies Twitter account tweeted whole game in 'Rocky' quotes

If you watched Monday night's Phillies loss at the hands of the Colorado Rockies, you probably weren't very entertained -- unless you're a Rockies fan.

But if you followed the game on Twitter and happen to follow the Rockies' account, you may have been slightly more entertained.

Slightly.

They tried something we haven't seen from an opposing team just yet. They tweeted throughout the game using only quotes from the Rocky movie franchise.

Now, you can debate how successful of a move this was but you have to at least give them some points for creativity. And it's not like this was a playoff game with high stakes. This was a relatively boring Monday night game in the middle of May.

You can read our recap of the Phillies' 8-1 loss right here. Or here's how the night transpired on Twitter:

Are we there yet? Philly Sports Talk examines the state of the Sixers

Are we there yet? Philly Sports Talk examines the state of the Sixers

All week on Philly Sports Talk on CSN, we examine how our teams got to this point and where they are in the rebuilding process. 

On Tuesday, Sixers Insider Jessica Camerato takes a look at the state of the Sixers

How did we get here?
By now, you all know about “The Process.” The Sixers last competitive season was five years ago when they reached the Eastern Conference Semifinals in 2012. They began dismantling that group, and the following year, went 34-48 under Doug Collins. 

The Sixers then entered a three-year period of dismal basketball with a revolving door of players coached by Brett Brown that culminated in a 47-199 record. During that time, they stockpiled injured players, draft-and-stash prospects and a handful of future picks through transactions made by then-general manager Sam Hinkie.

Hinkie stepped down from his role with a memorable 13-page resignation letter last April. The Sixers hired Bryan Colangelo as president of basketball operations, marking a new chapter in the organization. 

The 2016-17 season was the first glimpse into the potential of “The Process.” They finished 28-54, including a 10-5 month of January. Joel Embiid made his NBA debut after two years. While he was limited to 31 games because of (another) injury, he quickly proved he can dominate when healthy. Dario Saric came to the NBA two years after being drafted in 2014 and emerged as a Rookie-of-the-Year candidate after Embiid was shut down for the season. The Sixers landed the number one pick in the 2016 draft and are waiting on the debut of Ben Simmons, who suffered a Jones fracture in training camp. This season, the Sixers established legitimate pieces for their future, rather than players who could be on the summer league team. 

Are the Sixers on the right path back to prosperity?
The Sixers are on the right path back to prosperity, and it starts this offseason. They have the third pick in the 2017 draft, with the possibilities of adding another young talent or packaging the pick to land a more established player. The Sixers have flexibility with plenty of cap space — which they could use to acquire a key free agent. The team has maintained they will not rush into making a trade just for the sake of it  — Jahlil Okafor’s future with the Sixers is still uncertain — or spending money just because it’s available. The Sixers showed flashes of potential last season. If they gather the right pieces this summer and — a big “and” — they stay healthy, the Sixers will continue to move toward an upward trend of rebuilding with the longer-term goals (this isn't happening overnight) of becoming a contender again. 

Coming Wednesday: A look at the Phillies' rebuild