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The Strangest Union Goal Ever: An (Indirect) Explanation

The Strangest Union Goal Ever: An (Indirect) Explanation

One of the best things about going to Union games the last three-plus years has been meeting lots of great people who DIDN'T grow up around the game.

There are plenty of people -- including my semi-regular tailgate crew (I promise to get down there early again sometime soon, guys) -- who don't wake up at 7 a.m. for EPL games and for whom Union games are simply a great way to spend a Saturday. They got dragged to a game once, not knowing the difference between an indirect kick and a penalty kick -- and have been fans ever since.

For some at PPL Park (you know who you are), these people are a nuisance, ruining their soccer snobbery with a few uneducated questions.

For me, I've found out those people are a large segment of the audience here at The Level. So, from time to time, I'll try to break down a play, moment, or trend that might seem commonplace to a soccer-head, but drew a "WTF?" from everyone else.

There's no better place to start than with the Union's second goal last week against Chivas USA. See it for yourself.

I watched this game from my couch, and immediately saw countless "What the hell?" tweets from fans. Well, here goes:

Nearly every single whistle in soccer results in a "direct" kick. It wasn't always that way (at least not from what 14-year-old me remembers from referee classes, but I digress). Handballs, dangerous tackles, push-offs, etc., all result in a "direct" kick, which simply means the kick-taker can shoot directly on goal if he so desires. You'll often see a teammate roll or touch the ball on a free kick before it's hit, but that's simply an attempt at misdirection or to gain an extra foot of space.

There are SOME fouls that result in "indirect" kicks. This simply means that someone other than the kick-taker must touch the ball before a goal can be scored (technically, the kickoff to start halves and after goals is also an indirect kick -- as is a throw-in).

There are really only two whistles you'll ever seen in a professional game that result in an indirect kick. One is for an offside violation. But since the farthest forward that kick can ever be taken is just inside midfield (you can't be offside in your own half), the ball will always touch another player anyway. So it's a moot point.

The other is what you saw Saturday.

After a ball into the box by new signing Fabinho, Chivas' Edgar Mejia seemed to stumble on the wet grass while going for the loose ball. What his intentions were, it's hard to tell. But according to the referee, he INTENTIONALLY passed the ball back to goalie Dan Kennedy. That's the key word: Intentionally.

Passing it back to your keeper is fine. But if you do it on purpose, the goalie is not allowed to use his hands. The moment Kennedy picked up the ball, the whistle blew, and everyone was confused. Usually, players are given the benefit of the doubt on backpasses, especially in a hectic and crowded penalty area. And ESPECIALLY when Noah was preparing the ark behind the River End. In my opinion, only the most blatant backpass should be whistled in those conditions.

The catch in this situation is that unlike every other foul committed inside the box, illegal touching (::giggle::) by the goalkeeper is not a penalty kick. So the ball is placed at the spot of the foul (about seven yards out, in this case), and it must be touched before going in the net (an opposing player would also count, so in theory you could blast it off the keeper's hands and in).

On any free kick, defenders must stand 10 yards away. In this case, there aren't 10 yards to give, so all Chivas players SHOULD have been on the goal line until Sebastien Le Toux touched the ball. Clearly that didn't happen, but it didn't much matter.

Once Le Toux touched the ball, it's fair game (if I remember from my reffing classes, it is supposed to roll one full rotation). And to his credit, Michael Farfan -- who I have been critical of this season -- perfectly placed a shot that is MUCH harder than he made it look.

It's the kind of goal you likely won't see again for a long, long time, and one of the most bizarre plays in the sport. Chivas USA fans (if they really exist) have every right to be apoplectic about the call that led to the kick. But if you're a Union fan, three points is three points.

Oh, and judging by the forecast, we could see even more biblical rain during Saturday's game against Portland. So maybe things will get weird yet again. (Jack McInerney will be eligible after being released from national team duty Wednesday night. He did not appear in three group games for Jurgen Klinsmann.)

CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

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CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

Position Title: Intern
Department: Advertising/Sales
Company: Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia
# of hours / week: 10 – 20 hours

Deadline: November 20

Basic Function

This position will work closely with the Vice President of Sales in generating revenue through commercial advertisements and sponsorship sales. The intern will gain first-hand sales experience through working with Sales Assistants and AEs on pitches, sales-calls and recapping material.

Duties and Responsibilities

• Assist Account Executive on preparation of Sales Presentations
• Cultivate new account leads for local sales
• Track sponsorships in specified programs
• Assist as point of contact with sponsors on game night set up and pre-game hospitality elements.
• Assist with collection of all proof of performance materials.
• Perform Competitive Network Analysis
• Update Customer database
• Other various projects as assigned

Requirements

1. Good oral and written communication skills.
2. Knowledge of sports.
3. Ability to work non-traditional hours, weekends & holidays
4. Ability to work in a fast-paced, high-pressure environment
5. Must be 19 years of age or older
6. Must be a student in pursuit of an Associate, Bachelor, Master or Juris Doctor degree
7. Must have unrestricted authorization to work in the US
8. Must have sophomore standing or above
9. Must have a 3.0 GPA

Interested students should apply here and specify they're interested in the ad/sales internship.

About NBC internships

Chris Long donating first 6 game checks for scholarships in Charlottesville

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Chris Long donating first 6 game checks for scholarships in Charlottesville

Chris Long talked the talk. Now he's walking the walk. 

The Eagles defensive end is donating his first six game checks of the 2017 season to fund two scholarships in his hometown of Charlottesville, Virginia. 

In August, Long spoke out about the violent protests in Charlottesville (see story).  At that time, he thought the majority of the original protesters, protesting the removal of a Confederate statue, were from out of town. He thought his neighbors were the ones trying to stop them. He also took umbrage to President Donald Trump's response, which condemned "violence on many sides."  

Now, Long is doing more than just speaking out. Based on his $1 million base salary in 2017, six games checks will amount to roughly $375,000. 

"In August, we watched people fill our hometown streets with hatred and bigotry," Long said in a release. "Megan (his wife) and I decided to try to combat those actions with our own positive investment in our community." 

According to the release, the scholarships will be administered by Long's alma mater, St. Anne's-Belfield School. Two members of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Virginia will be given the seven-year scholarships to go a Virginia school. The two scholarships will go to students entering sixth grade and will provide them with tuition through high school graduation. 

The Longs have actually been sponsoring a student who will graduate this spring from St. Anne's-Belfield, the release said. They have been paying for the student's tuition for the past six years. But now, Long wants to make a more public statement. 

"We want these scholarships to be reflective of what the 'Cville' community is really about -- supporting one another, social equality and building up those in our community who need it," Long said. "We hope our investment will change the lives of the students who receive the scholarship and in turn, those students can positively impact others."