Alex Lyon

Flyers-Bruins preseason observations: Power play goes 0 for 9 in OT loss

Flyers-Bruins preseason observations: Power play goes 0 for 9 in OT loss

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BOSTON — It's still early in preseason, so the Flyers have a lot of time to iron out their power-play problems.

And they have a lot of problems.

Even with their most veteran-laden lineup of the preseason on the ice against the Boston Bruins on Thursday, the Flyers went 0 for 9 on the power play and lost, 2-1, in overtime at TD Garden.

Assistant coach Kris Knoblauch had most of the Flyers’ weapons but the man-advantage didn’t score, didn’t threaten and did little to build momentum.

Rookie defenseman Travis Sanheim scored a 4-on-4 goal at 4:57 of the third period to make it 1-0. The Bruins answered at 6:39 with a goal by defenseman Paul Postma to tie it 1-1. Kenny Agostino scored the game-winner 3:20 into overtime, as the Flyers fell to 1-1-2 in preseason action.

On to the observations:

• The loss and the power-play struggles aside, the Flyers avoided one potential nightmare. Second-year forward Travis Konecny had to leave the game after just 18 seconds of first-period play. But he returned to action later in the period.

Konecny was hit late and high at the red line away from the puck by Bruins rookie forward Jesse Gabrielle just before the whistle came 18 seconds into the game. Konecny returned with a little more than four minutes remaining in the first period.

Konecny looked himself when he nearly scored in the final minute of the first period, but his redirection of a Sanheim pass on a 3-on-2 went wide of the Boston net.

Gabrielle, trying to make the Bruins as a bottom-six forward, should hear from the NHL department of player safety, although Konecny’s return might’ve gotten Gabrielle off the hook.

• Goaltender Brian Elliott made his Flyers preseason debut and made 18 saves on 18 shots through two periods before Alex Lyon replaced him at the start of the third (see story). Lyon made nine saves, including one on Anton Blidh on a 2-on-1 late in the third period and one on Zach Senyshyn on another 2-on-1 in overtime to preserve the 1-1 tie.

• Sanheim was strong at both ends throughout the game, getting active on offense even before the game. He made a big play to break up a 2-on-1 with a Flyers power play late in the second period. Sanheim could make it difficult for the Flyers to pick among their three rookies for two spots on defense. Of course if Brandon Manning isn’t ready to start the season, there could be three spots available.

• Despite practicing as a left winger on Tuesday, captain Claude Giroux made his preseason debut at center between Oskar Lindblom and Jakub Voracek.

Giroux looked himself throughout the night, both 5-on-5 and on special teams. Early in the second period he canceled out a Boston power play by drawing a holding penalty on Bruins defenseman Postma during a race to the puck in the Boston end. He was also in the box for Sanheim’s goal and just exiting the box when Postma scored for Boston.

Coach Dave Hakstol said Thursday morning he would like to test Giroux out on the wing during a game later in the preseason.

• Voracek made his preseason debut and had his skating legs early as he won a race with Bruins forward Blidh into the Boston zone and drew a slashing penalty with a drive to the net.

• The Flyers dodged a miscommunication in the first period shortly after the Gabrielle penalty expired. When Konecny’s linemates Michael Raffl and Sean Couturier jumped on the ice for their shift, no one jumped over the bench with them and the Flyers played with four skaters for about 10-12 seconds. The puck changed possession a couple times in safe areas of the ice. And one could say the strategy worked because during the next shift, Voracek drew a penalty.

• Flyers forward Colin McDonald nearly joined Konecny on the sidelines near the three-minute mark. Off a faceoff win, Andrew MacDonald’s slap shot hit his teammate. McDonald hobbled to the bench. The Flyers didn’t need any more friendly fire considering they were already without Konecny.

• Lindblom joined Giroux and Voracek on the Flyers’ first line and that carried over to the power play, where Lindblom was part of the first unit along with Giroux, Voracek, Ivan Provorov and Wayne Simmonds until late in the second period. After the Flyers' power play had gone 0 for 5, Hakstrol switched Lindblom with Valtteri Filppula and that seemed to jump-start the man advantage. The Flyers didn’t score but put more pressure on Tuukka Rask during their sixth power play.

• Thursday morning the Flyers reduced their roster by 18 players. Forwards Connor Bunnaman (Kitchener — OHL), Pascal Laberge (Victoriaville — QMJHL), Ivan Kosorenkov (Victoriaville — QMJHL), German Rubtsov (Chicoutimi — QMJHL), and goaltender Carter Hart (Everett — WHL) were returned to their junior teams.

Then the Flyers assigned forwards Nicolas Aube-Kubel, Radel Fazleev, Tyrell Goulbourne, Danick Martel, Carsen Twarynski, Mikhail Vorobyev; defensemen James de Haas, Mark Friedman, Maxim Lamarche, Phil Myers, Reece Willcox; and goaltenders Leland Irving and John Muse to AHL affiliate Lehigh Valley (more on moves here).

Here’s a look at how the Flyers lined up to start the game:

Oskar Lindblom-Claude Giroux-Jakub Voracek
Michael Raffl-Sean Couturier-Travis Konecny
Jordan Weal-Nolan Patrick-Wayne Simmonds
Taylor Leier-Valtteri Filppula-Colin McDonald

Travis Sanheim-Radko Gudas
Sam Morin-Andrew MacDonald
Ivan Provorov-Robert Hagg

There's more to Alex Lyon than just NHL dreams with Flyers

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Zack Hill/Philadelphia Flyers

There's more to Alex Lyon than just NHL dreams with Flyers

VOORHEES, N.J. — As the Flyers tee it up Tuesday during their annual tournament at Trump National Golf Club in Pine Hill, New Jersey, Alex Lyon may be the rare athlete who’s more interested in Trump’s plans for diplomacy than the layout of his golf courses.

The Flyers' netminder has two real passions in life moving forward: playing in the NHL and studying nuclear war. We’ll elaborate on the latter of those two topics in a moment.

As far as the hockey, Lyon enters Year 2 in the Flyers' organization with his head securely focused on playing the game, whereas this time last season, his mind was spinning in different directions.

“Last year, training camp was a novelty,” Lyon said last week. “This year, I know what to expect and I know where I can push the limits and I feel I’m coming in to do damage, rather than coming in to see what’s going on. It’s amazing the difference in mentality between Year 1 and Year 2. Honestly, the confidence level is so much better.”

Handling and maintaining his responsibilities as a professional were a big chunk of Lyon’s adjustment, as was trying to find answers to his own hypothetical questions.

“Where’s this guy at? What’s this guy doing? Who’s being drafted and all that nonsense,” Lyon said. “Now I’ve tried to change my mindset and say, ‘Let’s just focus on making Alex Lyon the best hockey player he can be and let the chips fall where they may.’ I think I’ve been improving more and more because I’ve been so happy. Once you cut out that other stuff, there’s not that much to worry about.”

An unknown commodity a year ago, Lyon exceeded expectations in his first year in Lehigh Valley working in tandem with Anthony Stolarz, who spent an early part of the season with the Flyers. Now that Stolarz has reinjured the meniscus in his left knee, Lyon now has less competition for the starting job in Lehigh Valley and one fewer obstacle on the organizational depth chart in the event Brian Elliott or Michal Neuvirth suffer an injury.     

“To see him build on his year last year, he did a real good job,” Flyers head coach Dave Hakstol said. “He wasn’t a guy that was talked about a whole lot, but he did have a real solid year last year in Lehigh Valley. He just has to improve on that and keep building. I know he’s had a good summer. He’s very dedicated in the way he works at his game. Now he’s got to carry that through to a good training camp up here, and I hope over the next few weeks he can have a real solid body of work.”

Indeed, Lyon also has the mentality to play the position. He left Yale University just six credit hours shy of finishing his degree in political science, and he can’t graduate until he returns to the New Haven, Connecticut campus to write his senior thesis on ... global nuclear war. Considering the state of current affairs with Kim Jong Un and North Korea, that thesis appears to be writing itself.

“Nuclear weapons really do interest me,” Lyon said. “It’s an interesting philosophy because nuclear weapons are the best deterrent for nuclear weapons. Mutually assured destruction — it’s a buzz phrase and you would use it in every single test you would write. Mutually assured destruction is: If Russia bombs us with a nuclear weapon, it's mutually assured that we’re going to bomb each other. It’s over!”

Now you have gained some insight into what runs through the mind of a goaltending Ivy Leaguer who wants to experience the world, as he puts it, “On his own terms” and as a “free spirit.” This past November, the free-spirited Lyon was eligible to vote in a Presidential election for just the second time in his life.

“It’s interesting, psychology and politics — those two things came together in the last election,” Lyon said. “It’s so interesting to see why people are doing what they’re doing, how they’re doing it, and why they’re voting certain ways. I think that’s what it actually comes down to. There’s such an interesting mindset behind everything that’s going on. It’s just all intertwined for me.”

Questions one day Lyon will attempt to answer, but before he resumes his work of stopping global catastrophe, the Flyers have a much more narrow-minded focus for him: just stopping the puck.

Flyers goalie prospect pays homage to 'It' with clown-themed mask

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Photo: Davidofdaveart

Flyers goalie prospect pays homage to 'It' with clown-themed mask

You want intimidation? I’ll show you intimidation.

Stealing a quote from "Little Giants," but that’s what Flyers prospect Alex Lyon is doing with his new mask for this season, which has to be the scariest in all of hockey.

Lyon, who played in 47 games last season for the Lehigh Valley Phantoms and is expected to start this season there, pays homage to the movie "It" with a clown-themed mask with orange balloons, instead of the red balloons used in the new movie.

This mask is frightening, and perhaps, it’ll give nightmares to opposing players.

(Photo from @davidofdaveart on Instagram)

Also hitting the Internet is the mask of goalie Brian Elliott. Elliott, signed by the Flyers in the offseason to a two-year, $5.5 million deal, has a mask similar to Ron Hextall when the current Flyers GM was their goalie.

If we’re talking about goalie masks, it must almost be hockey season. The puck drops on a new year on Oct. 4 in San Jose.