Tommy Joseph's discipline yielding better results after ugly April

Tommy Joseph's discipline yielding better results after ugly April

Tommy Joseph has quietly started to turn it on in May. Entering Tuesday's game, the first baseman was hitting .333 with a .417 on-base percentage this month.

In April, he batted .179 with an OBP of .222.

Joseph on Tuesday night continued to see the ball well, going 1 for 2 with a solo homer in the first inning — back-to-back with Michael Saunders — and reaching base three more times via walk.

"At some point guys make adjustments," Pete Mackanin said after a 10-9 loss to the Mariners (see Instant Replay). "And he's been making adjustments and he looks much better at the plate right now. He hit the home run, it was a nice-looking line drive. He's being more selective and not swinging at pitches out of the zone and looking for pitches he can handle."

Joseph seems to have made the necessary adjustments, which stem from hitting coach Matt Stairs, who before the season had stressed the importance of plate discipline.

"I've been working with Stairs quite a bit," Joseph said. "We've been talking about making little adjustments and trying to stay within myself … trying to simplify things a little bit."

After the lackluster April, it was only natural to wonder if the Phillies would consider bringing up first base prospect Rhys Hoskins, who has been tearing up Triple A pitching. Hoskins is hitting .330 with eight home runs and 21 RBIs in 31 games for Lehigh Valley.

But job security is the last thing on Joseph's mind.

"No, no I mean Rhys is a good player," Joseph said. "I know that. Everybody in this organization knows that, but that's not up to me to worry about — job security or anything like that."

Joseph still has only three homers in his first 27 games of 2017. As a rookie last season, he put up seven over his first 27 games and finished the year with 21.

A good sign for Joseph this month has been working more counts. That should lead to more drivable pitches, as shown in his first at-bat on Tuesday.

Maikel Franco breaks out of slump just in time to face nemesis Bartolo Colon

Maikel Franco breaks out of slump just in time to face nemesis Bartolo Colon

NEW YORK -- Maikel Franco lugged a career-worst 0-for-21 slump into Thursday night's game against the New York Mets.

By the second inning, the skid had swelled to 0 for 22 and it was reasonable to begin to wonder if Franco would get a night off when the Phillies returned home Friday to face Bartolo Colon and the Atlanta Braves. After all, Franco is 1 for 16 with no walks and three strikeouts lifetime against Colon, the portly right-hander who knows how to exploit Franco's free-swinging tendencies with savvy, pitch movement and change of speed.

When Pete Mackanin posts his starting lineup for Friday night's game, look for Franco to be in it.

Colon or no Colon, Mackanin has to play Franco after the way he rebounded after his first at-bat Thursday night.

Franco scorched an RBI double to left field against gas-throwing Noah Syndergaard in the third inning and later belted a home run against Fernando Salas to help lead the Phillies' 6-4 win over the Mets (see game story).

It was a slump-busting, confidence-building, frustration-dissipating game for Franco. The Phils' cleanup man will carry a .172 batting average into Friday night.

"It was great to see Franco finally break through," Mackanin said. "He's not going to hit .150, .160. These guys that are hitting .380 and .400, they're not going to hit .380 and .400 all season. Everything evens out."

Franco admitted that the slump had begun to frustrate him. He believed that he was hitting the ball better than his results. He was, in fact. Entering Thursday, the ball had come off his bat at 91.7 miles per hour, according to MLB's Statcast data. That was the 18th-best average exit velocity in baseball. On balls in play, Franco was hitting just .136 entering Thursday and that suggests some bad luck.

But it wasn't all bad luck, in the opinion of hitting coach Matt Stairs.

"It's kind of surprising to see his numbers with the amount of work he does in the batting cage," Stairs said before the game. "He works his tail off. He does everything right in the cage, gets out in batting practice and works on things and has great BPs, drives the ball to left-center and right-center, not thinking pull.

"I think the thing that is hurting him this year is that he's gotten some pitches to hit and he's missing them. I really do. If you go back and look at the films, he's had some pitches to hit. I don't know if he's gotten a little too big (with his swing). I think his timing is off a little bit. His foot is getting down late which is causing him to miss those pitches.

"Yeah, he is running into some bad luck. But I'm not going to say that's the reason he's hitting what he's hitting. He's made some easy outs on balls he should be hitting."

Though his batting average is down, Franco's selectivity at the plate, a major problem last year, has improved in the early season. He entered Thursday seeing 3.93 pitches per at-bat, up from 3.56 last year, and his walk rate was 8.3 percent, up from 6.3.

Before the game, Stairs offered the opinion that Franco was ready to break out.

"Am I worried about him?" Stairs said. "No. It takes one swing to turn it around."

Franco found that swing.

Twice.

Now comes the test of Bartolo Colon.

Phillies head home, where their offense was historically bad in 2016

Phillies head home, where their offense was historically bad in 2016

CINCINNATI -- First-year Phillies hitting coach Matt Stairs oozes positivity when he talks about approach and game plan with his hitters.

But on Friday, before the Phillies play their home opener against the Washington Nationals at Citizens Bank Park, Stairs will mention a couple of negatives.

Like the team's home batting average of .230 last season.

And the team's home on-base percentage of .291 last season.

Not only were both marks the worst in the majors last year, they were the worst in franchise history since official record keeping began in 1913.

"I'll remind them, absolutely," Stairs said. "I'll pull up the numbers. Numbers don't lie.

"That's the only negative thing I'll bring up, though. This is a new year."

The Phillies scored a majors-low 610 runs last season and finished 29th out of 30 clubs in batting average (.240) and on-base percentage (.301), so it stands to reason they would not have been very good at home.

But there was a serious discrepancy in their home and road splits. On the road, they hit .250, which ranked 21st in the majors, and had a .310 on-base percentage, 23rd in the majors. They scored 52 more runs on the road than they did at home.

So what gives?

Stairs, who spent the last three seasons in the broadcast booth, thinks the reason was actually rather simple.

"Smaller park," he said, referring to the cozy dimensions at Citizens Bank Park. "Guys over-swing trying to hit the ball out. That's what it looked like to me watching from the booth. On the road they used the whole field more."

Bench coach Larry Bowa saw the same thing.

"Small ballpark," he said. "Swings get long and loopy.

"We're basically a line-drive hitting team. We're not going to win, 9-8. We're going to win, 4-3, 3-2. Good pitching, catch the ball, runner on third with less than two outs, get him home. That's how we'll win. If you hit a good line drive, it will go out.

"Also, in fairness, we have a lot of good pitching in our division. It's not like we're facing patsies."

He's right about that.

The Phillies face reigning NL Cy Young winner Max Scherzer on Friday. He is 7-1 with a 2.14 ERA in 11 career starts against the Phillies and 4-0 with a 1.95 ERA in five starts at Citizens Bank Park.

Cameron Rupp's home-road splits did not match the team's last season. He hit .266 with a .776 OPS at home as opposed to .239/.725 on the road.

"If you stay with your approach and your plan, you'll have success anywhere," he said. "When you get off it, you give away at-bats. That's what Stairsy has been preaching: have quality at-bats. In a hitters park sometimes you try to do too much. We can't do that. We have to stay with our approach."

That's what Stairs will tell his hitters as they head home to face Scherzer on Friday.

"Stay gap to gap," he said.