MLB

Young girl hospitalized by 105-mph foul ball at Yankee Stadium

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AP Images

Young girl hospitalized by 105-mph foul ball at Yankee Stadium

NEW YORK -- A young girl at Yankee Stadium was injured by a 105-mph foul ball off the bat of Todd Frazier during Wednesday's game against Minnesota, leading some players to call for protective netting to be extended.

The Yankees said the girl was taken to a hospital for treatment, and New York manager Joe Girardi said he had been told by team security that she was OK. The game was delayed for about 4 minutes while she was attended to and then carried from the seats in the bottom of the fifth inning.

A shaken Frazier crouched with his hands over his face. The Yankees third baseman then bowed his head, walked away from the plate, crouched again and rested his head on the end of his bat.

"I thought of my kids. I have two kids under 3 years old and I just hope she's all right," said Frazier, who flied out later in the at-bat. "I know the dad or whoever it was that was with them was trying their hardest, but the ball's coming at 120 miles an hour at them and the ball's hooking. So it's like if you've never seen a ball like that, which most people in the world haven't, it's very tough."

Asked whether there should be more netting, Yankees rookie slugger Aaron Judge said: "We need it."

Twins players also were distressed, and second baseman Brian Dozier and the Yankees' Matt Holliday had tears as they said prayers at second base.

"We've been trying to get these teams to put nets up," Dozier said. "Number one, you don't bring kids down there. And number two, every stadium needs to have nets. That's it. I don't care about the damn view of the fan or what. It's all about safety. I still have a knot in my stomach."

As to what it would take to get nets up, Dozier responded: "The last resort that we don't ever want to have happen. I'm not going to say it, but you know what I'm talking about."

Speaking through a translator, Twins infielder Eduardo Escobar said, "I just saw blood coming out of this little girl." He said perhaps kids under a certain age be prohibited from seats without protection.

Major League Baseball issued recommendations for protecting netting or screens in December 2015, encouraging teams to have it in place between the ends of the dugouts closest to home plate.

"It remains an ongoing discussion in the industry," Commissioner Rob Manfred said at Safeco Field, before Wednesday night's game between Seattle and Texas. "We gave some guidelines two years ago, and what we have done since then is that we have encouraged the individual clubs to engage in a localized process, look at their own stadiums -- every stadium's different -- and to try to make a good decision about how far the netting should go in order to promote fan safety."

"If you look at what's happened, there has been a continuous focus forward movement in terms of increased netting in stadiums around the leagues and I expect that process will continue this offseason," he said.

The Mets extended netting beyond the outfield ends of the dugouts this season after the All-Star break. The Yankees said in an August statement posted on the team's website that they "are seriously exploring extending the netting prior to the 2018 season."

A boy was struck on the head by a portion of Chris Carter's broken bat at Yankee Stadium on May 25, and a fan sitting beyond the first-base dugout was hit by a 105-mph foul ball off the bat of Judge on July 25. That fan had a bloody bandage around his head as he left his seat.

New York City Councilman Rafael L. Espinal Jr. introduced legislation in May for protective netting to be extended to the ends of both dugouts, and a hearing is scheduled for Oct. 25.

"No one should ever go to a baseball game and leave severely injured," Espinal said in a statement. "Nor should any player have to feel the guilt associated with injuring a fan, especially when that injury could have been prevented by safety nets."

Frazier and teammate CC Sabathia said their families always sit behind netting or screens.

"I think the netting should be up. I think every stadium should have it, but we're not at that point yet," Frazier said. "Hopefully, they took a look at all this and they figure something out."

Girardi recalled a fan being badly injured while he was catching for the Chicago Cubs and said new ballparks "are more intimate" with "fans closer to home plate."

"I'm for making everything as safe as possible for everyone at the ballpark -- players, too," Girardi said.

John Kruk gets lost in hotels on an 'almost nightly' basis on road trips

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John Kruk gets lost in hotels on an 'almost nightly' basis on road trips

John Kruk has spent a lot of time in hotels as a player and broadcaster.

But he still somehow gets lost almost every time he ventures into a new hotel. 

“You would think that I would be able to find my hotel room after doing it so many times as a player,” Kruk said. “It is almost nightly where I have absolutely no idea whether I turn left or right outside of the elevator. The guys laugh a ton at me but they have helped me find my room on occasion and I try to follow them in the hotel.”

In the latest episode of CSNPhilly's Krukcast podcast, Kruk dives into what life on the road is like with Tom McCarthy, Larry Andersen, Gregg Murphy, Ben Davis and Scott Franzke and how each member of the Phillies' broadcast team has their own assumed role.

“We kind of have jobs when we are in the room together,” Kruk said. “I like to sweep and clean up the messes I make, Andersen likes to iron, (Murphy) has the products if we forget something. Someone once came in the room to sit and didn’t say a word but said we should be a reality show because we are half nuts.”

“(McCarthy) is the big brother of the group. He watches out for all of us and if you know anything about any of us, we need to be watched over. He is the one who sends out what shirts we wear on a daily basis. He organizes the golf on the road and you couldn’t ask for anything more. It’s like having your own personal secretary.”

To hear about life on the road, Kruk’s reasons against sightseeing, the crew’s adventures on the golf course and more, click below for the full podcast.

Best of MLB: Indians set AL record with 21st straight win

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USA Today Images

Best of MLB: Indians set AL record with 21st straight win

CLEVELAND -- The Cleveland Indians won their 21st straight game on Wednesday, 5-3 over the Detroit Tigers, to set a AL winning-streak record and join only two other teams in the past 101 years to win that many consecutive games.

Jay Bruce hit a three-run homer off Buck Farmer (4-3) and Mike Clevinger (10-5) won his fourth straight start as the Indians matched the 1935 Chicago Cubs for the second-longest streak since 1900. The run has put Cleveland within five wins of catching the 1916 New York Giants, who won 26 straight without a loss but whose century-old mark includes a tie.

The Indians haven't lost in 20 days, and they've rarely been challenged during a late-season run. However, they had to overcome a costly error and rely on their bullpen to hold off the Tigers, who closed within 4-3.

Roberto Perez added a homer in the seventh and four Cleveland relievers finished, with Cody Allen getting his 27th save.

With the crowd of 29,346 standing and stomping, Allen retired Ian Kinsler for the final out, giving the Indians the league's longest streak since the AL was founded in 1901 (see full recap).

Yankees beat Rays, take 2 of 3 at Citi Field
NEW YORK -- A disappointed Jaime Garcia didn't say a word to manager Joe Girardi when he was removed one out shy of qualifying for his first win with the Yankees, and New York beat the Tampa Bay Rays 3-2 Wednesday to take two of three games in a series moved from Florida to Citi Field because of Hurricane Irma.

Garcia is 0-2 in six starts since the Yankees acquired him from Minnesota. He allowed one run and five hits in 4 2/3 innings, giving up a leadoff homer to Kevin Kiermaier in the third.

Chad Green (5-0) struck out the side in the sixth, and Tommy Kahnle overcame two hits in the seventh with the help of a double play. Dellin Betances was replaced with Aroldis Chapman with one on and two outs in the eighth. Chapman walked Steven Souza Jr. and gave up an RBI single to Adeiny Hechavarria that sent Souza to third. Chapman struck out pinch-hitter Wilson Ramos.

Curt Casali walked leading off the ninth. Chapman then struck out Brad Miller, Kevin Kiermaier and Lucas Duda for his 18th save in 22 chances (see full recap).

White Sox score 2 in 9th to beat Royals
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Jose Abreu and Avisail Garcia drove in runs in the ninth inning as the Chicago White Sox beat the Kansas City Royals 5-3 on Wednesday.

Abreu's sacrifice fly scored Tim Anderson, who led off the inning with a single, took second on a wild pitch by Scott Alexander (4-4) and stole third.

Garcia's single to center scored Yoan Moncada with the second run. Garcia is hitting an American League-leading .432 against left-handed pitchers.

The Royals tied the score at 3 in the eighth. Alcides Escobar singled in one run, while pinch runner Terrance Gore scored the other on an Alex Gordon groundout.

Juan Minaya (3-2) pitched 1 1/3 scoreless innings to pick up the victory. The White Sox won two of three in the series.

Royals starter Eric Skoglund lasted only three innings and 66 pitches, giving up three runs on five hits.

White Sox starter Lucas Giolito yielded one run, a homer by Salvador Perez in the sixth inning, in 6 1/3 innings (see full recap).