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Temple in Akron to Take on the Zips

Temple in Akron to Take on the Zips

The Temple Owls are on the road and set to take on the Akron Zips at InfoCision Stadium — Summa Field (6 p.m. / ESPN 3). If the stadium's name seems like a mouthful, bear in mind that their old home field was named the "Rubber Bowl;" so, they sort of went the other way on that one.

Anyway, on paper, this should prove the Owls' easiest game of 2011. The Zips went just 1-11 in 2010 and opened up their season last week with a 42-0 loss to The Ohio State University. While getting waxed by OSU isn't necessarily the end of the world for a MAC program, consider that Toledo just gave those same Buckeyes one hell of a game from inside the Horseshoe earlier today. It should also be noted that Akron amassed just 90 total yards in the loss.

As for the series history between the Owls and Zips, Temple leads the all-time head-to-head at 13-7; they hold a 6-3 advantage over the Zips in games played at Akron. Last year, in a mid-season match up at Lincoln Financial Field, Temple hammered the Zips by a final score of 30-0. Up just by just six at the half, Temple ripped off 24-straight in the second half to cover the 28-point spread by just 2. They'll be giving 16 today.
With all that in mind, the Owls should nonetheless be wary of a potential letdown. Underestimating the Zips and looking one week ahead toward Penn State seems like the perfect recipe for disaster. Thankfully, coach Steve Addazio's insistence on "taking things one week at a time" should keep Temple directed.

Quarterback Chester Stewart and defensive back Kee-ayre Griffin are set to make their returns for the Owls after serving one-week suspensions and missing the Mayor's Cup. While Griffin will more than likely get his reps, it remains unclear as to whether Stewart will fill in as the No. 2 behind quarterback Mike Gerardi, or if he will instead begin his senior year behind Gerardi's week 1 back-up, sophomore Chris Coyer.

Local forecasts are calling for clear skies and a temperature of 71-degrees at game time. Sounds like a nice night in Akron. 17-1 odds LeBron James shows up to root on the Zips. Who wants action?

Update: With just over six minutes left to play in the 1st quarter, the field has been cleared and the game has entered into a weather delay as a result of storms in the Akron area. So much for that "hourly Weather Channel forecast" we cited above. Meteorology!

We'll update when they come back out.

Update 2: They're back out (7:45 p.m.).

CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

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CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

Position Title: Intern
Department: Advertising/Sales
Company: Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia
# of hours / week: 10 – 20 hours

Deadline: November 20

Basic Function

This position will work closely with the Vice President of Sales in generating revenue through commercial advertisements and sponsorship sales. The intern will gain first-hand sales experience through working with Sales Assistants and AEs on pitches, sales-calls and recapping material.

Duties and Responsibilities

• Assist Account Executive on preparation of Sales Presentations
• Cultivate new account leads for local sales
• Track sponsorships in specified programs
• Assist as point of contact with sponsors on game night set up and pre-game hospitality elements.
• Assist with collection of all proof of performance materials.
• Perform Competitive Network Analysis
• Update Customer database
• Other various projects as assigned

Requirements

1. Good oral and written communication skills.
2. Knowledge of sports.
3. Ability to work non-traditional hours, weekends & holidays
4. Ability to work in a fast-paced, high-pressure environment
5. Must be 19 years of age or older
6. Must be a student in pursuit of an Associate, Bachelor, Master or Juris Doctor degree
7. Must have unrestricted authorization to work in the US
8. Must have sophomore standing or above
9. Must have a 3.0 GPA

Interested students should apply here and specify they're interested in the ad/sales internship.

About NBC internships

In 'organizational decision,' Eagles lock arms during national anthem

In 'organizational decision,' Eagles lock arms during national anthem

Malcolm Jenkins heard what President Donald Trump had to say Friday. He heard Trump encourage NFL owners to release players who protest during the national anthem. 

It was all pretty familiar. 

"Honestly, it's one of those things that it's no different than a troll on social media that I've been dealing with for a whole year," Jenkins said. "That same rhetoric is what I hear on a daily basis. It hits other people close to home when you see your teammate or a player across the league that you know is a great person, who's out there trying to do their part building our communities and making our communities greater, being attacked. I think that's why you saw the response that you did. Mostly from guys who hadn't been protesting or doing whatever already. 

"But for me, it was just more of what's been happening. Nothing anybody can say is going to stop me or deter me from being committed to bringing people together, impacting our communities in a positive way and being that voice of reason."

Trump's comments Friday in Alabama set off even more protests from around the NFL on Sunday (see story). The day started with the Jaguars and Ravens locking arms. The Steelers didn't even come out of the locker room for the anthem. 

And the Eagles took part too. 

Players, coaches and front office executives locked arms as Navy Petty Officer First Class (retired) Generald Wilson began to belt out the Star-Spangled Banner. The Eagles decided Sunday morning to hold the demonstration. Head coach Doug Pederson called it "an organizational decision." Owner Jeff Lurie, team president Don Smolenski and vice president of football operations Howie Roseman were among those who joined. 

"It meant a lot," said Jenkins, who has been raising his fist during the anthem for a year to protest against racial injustice. "I know Mr. Lurie specifically doesn't go on the field much, so for him to be down there and showing their support in their own ways in important. I was happy to see that league-wide." 

Jenkins has continued his demonstration this year and has been somewhat joined by teammates Chris Long and Rodney McLeod, who have been placing their arms around him in a showing of support. 

It seemed like the entire team sort of did that Sunday. 

"It was nice that it was a team effort," defensive end Brandon Graham said. "That's what we wanted. We just wanted a team effort of everybody standing up for the right thing.

"It was good that we all did it as a team, because I just don't like how they single people out and make it about one or a couple people or a group of people. I'm happy we did it as a team because I back those guys that are putting their career out there. It's tough. You get backlash, people start judging you a certain type of way, and to do it as a team, that's a credit to our owner, and I appreciate that."

For what it's worth, President Trump on Sunday condoned locking arms. He tweeted: "Great solidarity for our National Anthem and for our Country. Standing with locked arms is good, kneeling is not acceptable. Bad ratings!" 

It was clearly Trump's comments Friday that spawned Sunday's near-league-wide demonstration. His comments also elicited responses from NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, the NFLPA and many NFL owners, including Lurie

"It's just really a distraction," right tackle Lane Johnson said. "I don't like to get involved in politics and I don't think politicians should get involved in sports. It just creates a lot of noise and distraction that takes away from your main goal of winning games."

"It was interesting," Long said of Trump's comments. "It was interesting that he was so occupied with us."

Because of Trump's comments, Long said, "we're kind of also now protesting the right to protest, which you wouldn't think you'd have to do in this country." 

The only Eagles player who noticeably didn't partake in the showing of unity on Sunday was linebacker Mychal Kendricks. The veteran linebacker claimed his non-participation wasn't some sort of political statement.

"Don't think too deep into that," he said. 

When asked, in the wake of increased demonstrations, if Trump's comments backfired, Jenkins wasn't ready to say that. But he did think Sunday served as a chance to make the demonstrations something that brought unity instead of divisiveness. 

So what's next for the NFL? 

"I'm not sure," Jenkins said. "I know there are multiple guys who have been behind the scenes doing work. Hopefully, we can continue to highlight that and hopefully, it's not a one-week thing. We also know it's not about the protest, it's not about the national anthem. It's really about affecting change in our communities. 

"Hopefully, just like today was a collaborative effort of everybody pulling their resources to send messages and to bring people together, hopefully, that can continue on a micro level in each NFL city, each community and we can really break some walls down and makes some changes."