Temple Tops Richmond, Loses Eric for Season

Temple Tops Richmond, Loses Eric for Season

The Temple University Basketball Owls announced in a game time press release Thursday evening that starting center Michael Eric will miss the remainder of his Junior season with a fractured right patella. Junior guard and leading scorer Ramone Moore informed all interested parties after the team's 73-53 win over Richmond that the injury was sustained after a "freak accident" during a relatively light practice on Tuesday. The team was informed of Eric's status Wednesday.

A breakdown of the Richmond victory and the Owl's new rotation after the jump...

Temple shot an outrageous 55.6% from the floor Thursday night, while holding Richmond to a shade under 40. Leading scorers Ramone Moore and Juan Fernandez posted a combined 19-25 shooting. Even more impressive, Fernandez' only miss of the night came as a result of desperation three in an attempt to stave off an expiring shot clock.

No, he was not the Argentine Christian Laettner against Richmond, but one hopes that this break out performance will, indeed, break him out of the shooting funk he's been in since injuring his knee at the beginning of A10 play. Sitting alongside Moore in the post-game presser, Fernandez offered the following on what the performance meant to him given his recent struggles:

"I've been trying to get my confidence back for both my teammates and my coaches, and luckily for me, personally, it was a good game. But, most importantly, it was a good team win...I don't want to think about myself, I want to think about the team, and how to step my game up to help everybody else and to help us win."

20 points on 9 of 10 shooting preceded by a performance at Dayton featuring nine assists and zero turnovers is definitely what I would call "stepping up your game."

Outside Juan's play and the team's other gawdy totals, Temple's real advantage came, and oddly enough without their tallest player, down low. Though they only out-rebounded Richmond by a margin of 5 (33-28), Temple scored 18 of their 38 first half points in the paint.  Nine more came in the form of converted second chance opportunities.

A nine point lead at the half grew to as much as 21 on the back of a 16-0 Temple run early in the second, when Temple's perimeter shooting, defensive pressure and ability to get out in transition all seemed to gel at once.

"I said to the guys at halftime, 'last week against Fordham, we had a big lead and they came back,'" said Moore, who's taken over the reigns as Temple's on-court vocal leader this season. "'Let's keep that in the back of our minds and not let that happen,' and we were able to match their run [at the beginning of the second] and have one of our own and increase that lead again."

Before closing the book on Thursday and moving on to life without the man in the middle, two quick notes on the final score:

  1. The result of this game in no way reflects the talent level of the Richmond Spiders. Kevin Anderson is an elite guard, and the substantially improved play of big men Justin Harper and Dan Geriot makes Richmond a veteran team Temple fans shouldn't be too eager to see again. The Owls are not going to shoot that well every night, and Richmond won't go quietly a second time. Chalk this is up as unexpected rolling and don't take it for granted.
  2. Though Juan and Ramone received most of the attention above, every single member of the team contributed at both ends. It was a far more balanced effort in person than on paper. And it is exactly this sort of cohesive team play leads us to...

How life without Michael Eric, despite said cohesion, is going to be a challenge for Temple. With Craig Williams out, in all likelihood, for the remainder of the year and Freshman Anthony Lee wearing a medical red shirt, Lavoy Allen is the only traditional big left on the squad. Granted, Sophomore Rahlir Jefferson is insanely long, but he is still only 6'6.

The obvious counter-argument to Eric's influence goes something like this: "Well, wait, Temple just rolled one the three best teams in the A10 without Eric and he has only averaged 7.1 PPG in 20 minutes. It's not like he was eating 30+ minutes or boarding and scoring in double figures every night. What's the big deal?"

The big deal, fictional debater, is that Temple is now completely out of options in tight situations. If at any point Lavoy finds the same kind of foul trouble he did early in the year, then Temple will be forced to play a three (probably, in honest, four) guard line-up with Jefferson as the center. Also checking in at 6'6, Junior Scootie Randall, Temple's best perimeter defender, will fill in on the opposite block at power forward. This also assumes, by the way, that Rhalir is able to stay on the floor and off the PF sheet himself. If not, you're looking at graduate walk-on Dutch Gaitley as the only meaningful height on the roster. Otherwise, burning 6'10, 190-pound Jimmy McDonald's red shirt becomes the last viable option.

Moreover, don't be so quick to dismiss Eric's contributions on a nightly basis. Mike is the team's leading shot blocker and does well to alter far more shots than a stat sheet can show you. Sure, Temple's small lineup of Wyatt, Fernandez, Moore, Randall and Jefferson (and possibly at any time DiLeo or Brown) is absolutely freakish to watch in the open floor, but a lineup that size, at this level, is bound to prove itself as a gimmick against quality opponents.

When asked after the game what Mike's absence would mean heading forward, coach Dunphy was careful not to minimize the loss of his starting center:

"When these kinds of things happen, the first concern you always have is for the guy," Dunphy said, "and in this case, Mike's such a good man. He's worked hard to get to where he is, so when you get that word that the doctor tells you that you have a fractured patella and you're out for the season, that's pretty devastating for a young guy. You don't worry so much about the team; the team has this resiliency about them. They'll come together and they'll form this support system with one another, and they'll be OK. But you worry about the kid and in this case, we're worried about Mike. He'll be OK, but it's a shame that he has to miss the rest of the season."

The Owls will do their best to adjust to life after Eric with another game this Sunday, this time against the St. Joseph's Hawks. Tip off is set for 4p.m. from inside the Liacouras Center and will be broadcast live on Comcast Sportsnet. For those in attendance, the Temple student body is planning an extra special event in the stands related to SJU's eternally resiliant mascot. It might just be the loudest, sloppiest, most disingenuous "wake" of which you'll ever be apart. Well, unless you're Irish, of course.

Sarah Baicker: I don't skate like a man, just a darn good woman

Sarah Baicker: I don't skate like a man, just a darn good woman

In late December, I was invited to play in a pick-up hockey game with some other members of the local sports media community. It shouldn’t come as a surprise that I was one of only two women there that day. Even now, female ice hockey players aren’t exactly common.

After the game, a reporter I’ve known a while — a guy I like a lot — said to me: “Don’t take this the wrong way, but you skate like a man.” I didn’t take it wrong, of course; he meant it as a compliment. The reporter wanted nothing more than to tell me I’d impressed him.

I thought about this exchange a lot in the days that followed. Had someone told me I played hockey like a boy when I was 15, I would have worn that description like a badge. Hell yeah, 15-year-old Sarah would have thought, I do play like a boy. I’m as tough as a boy. I’m as fierce and competitive as any boy on my team. I would have reveled in it, just as I reveled in a similar label I’d received even earlier in my adolescence: tomboy.

Yeah, I was a tomboy. I hung around with the neighborhood boys, riding bikes between each other’s houses or catching salamanders in the creek that ran through town. I loved sports, and my bedroom walls — papered with newspaper clippings and photos of Flyers players — were a far cry from the pink-tinged rooms that belonged to the girls at school. 

As much as I could, I dressed like a boy too, even once cutting the sleeves off of an oversized T-shirt before I went out to rollerblade with our next-door neighbors. My grandmother, who was visiting at the time, pulled me aside to tell me I really ought to dress more appropriately. I rolled my eyes.

I was a tomboy, and I loved the word and everything it stood for. I felt pride in my tomboyishness, believing that the things I liked — the things boys liked — were clearly better than the things stereotypically left to the girls.

I’m almost embarrassed to admit it was a conversation with a 15-year-old that changed my perspective, just a few days after my reporter friend had compared my hockey skills to those of a man. I sat down with Mo’ne Davis, the female Little League pitching phenom, for this very project. I asked her if she identified as a tomboy, and she shrugged. Not really, she said. Maybe other people wanted to define her that way, she suggested, but that wasn’t how she viewed things.

You know that record scratch sound effect they play on TV or in the movies? The one that denotes a sort of “wait … what?!” moment? That’s what happened in my head. Mo’ne Davis, the girl who played on the boys’ team and excelled, didn’t consider herself a tomboy?

Something clicked in my head after that. I’ve long identified as a feminist, and I’ve been a big supporter of girls in sports for as long as I can remember. I coach girls hockey, I’ve spoken at schools and camps about playing and working in sports as a woman. For some reason, though, it took a 15-year-old shrugging her shoulders at the label “tomboy” to take the power out of the word for me. Why does one have to be a tomboy, when one can simply be a girl who kicks ass? How had I never considered this before?

In many ways (and especially in sports) if something is male, it’s considered superior. It goes beyond just the things kids like to do, and it’s all old news. It’s also something I’m ashamed to admit I’ve bought into for practically all of my life. But no longer. How can I help change the narrative if I’m too busy playing along with it?

And if I could do it over, when that reporter approached me after our hockey game to tell me I skated like a man, I would have smiled, shook my head and said: Nah. But I skate like a darn good woman.

Flyers-Capitals 5 things: Washington on ridiculous roll into Wells Fargo Center

Flyers-Capitals 5 things: Washington on ridiculous roll into Wells Fargo Center

Flyers (28-24-7) vs. Capitals (39-12-7)
8 p.m. on NBCSN, CSNPhilly.com and the NBC Sports App

After finding some offense to finish up a 1-2-0 road trip, the Flyers return home for a not-so-glorious welcome when they host the NHL-leading Washington Capitals on Wednesday night at the Wells Fargo Center.

We’ll get into that and more with five things to know:

1. Capping things off
What’s the Flyers’ reward for salvaging the final game of a road swing through Canada? A date with the Capitals, who are the NHL’s hottest team since New Year’s Eve, and by a landslide.

Just how dominant has Washington been?

Dating back to Dec. 31, the Capitals are 19-3-2 and have scored an incomprehensible 104 goals in those 24 games. That’s 4.33 goals per game, while yielding only 50 markers over that stretch.

Meanwhile, the Flyers have scored an NHL-low 40 goals since New Year’s Eve and allowed 62 for an Eastern Conference-worst goal differential of minus-22.

Washington, coming off its first back-to-back defeats since Dec. 27-29, has lost three straight games only once this season.

2. A Ghost sighting
On Sunday, for the first time in close to four months, we saw the Shayne Gostisbehere from the Calder Memorial Trophy (top rookie) runner-up season last year.

The sophomore blueliner delivered his first three-point game of his career to ignite the Flyers to a 3-2 win over the Canucks.

Although Gostisbehere has made it clear he’s focused on his defensive game, the Flyers are a different animal when he’s generating offensive chances at 5-on-5 and the power play.

“He had his confidence and a little bit of swagger,” Wayne Simmonds said of Gostisbehere’s performance Sunday.

“Ghost has had his ups and downs this year, but he's a heck of a player and has unbelievable skill. He can be a catalyst offensively for us, that’s for sure.”

3. Good cage match
This one makes for an intriguing goalie matchup between Michal Neuvirth and Braden Holtby, who were once battling for the net in Washington.

Holtby is having another stud season after winning the 2015-16 Vezina Trophy (top goalie). Among all netminders, he is tied for first in goals-against average (2.01) and shutouts (seven), while he hasn’t been beaten in regulation since Dec. 27.

The 27-year-old blanked the Flyers twice in the 2016 Stanley Cup Playoffs and stopped 149 of 154 shots over the first-round series that the Capitals won in six games.

Neuvirth hasn’t been too shabby himself, starting eight of the Flyers’ last 10 games. Aside from a bad showing in a 6-3 loss to the Oilers, Neuvirth has not surrendered more than two goals in any other outing during that span.

A 2006 second-round pick of Washington, Neuvirth was brilliant last postseason against his former club, making 103 saves on 105 shots faced to get the Flyers two victories.

4. Keep an eye on ...
Flyers: Pierre-Edouard Bellemare can be crucial in these types of games. The fourth-line forward often sees work against the opposition’s top offensive threats and is the Flyers’ most important piece to the penalty kill. Bellemare has played 16-plus minutes in both meetings with the Capitals this season, while the PK is 15 for 17 in February and tied for the NHL’s third-fewest goals against this month.

Capitals: T.J. Oshie is such an underrated asset for Washington. The right winger, who played his college hockey at North Dakota under Flyers coach Dave Hakstol, leads the NHL with a 22.8 shooting percentage, a big reason why the Capitals are scoring 3.34 goals per game, good for second most in hockey. Oshie has 26 points (13 goals, 13 assists) in his past 22 games and is a plus-24 on the season.

5. This and that
• Neuvirth has just two career regular-season matchups against the Capitals, going 1-0-0 with a 2.44 goals-against average and .914 save percentage.

• Holtby is 6-4-7 with a 2.71 goals-against average and .911 save percentage in 18 lifetime matchups with the Flyers.

• The Flyers are three points out of the Eastern Conference’s second wild-card spot, trailing the Panthers, Bruins and Islanders, all of whom have 66 points.

• Simmonds has four goals in his last five games.

• Claude Giroux has two points (one goal, one assist) in his previous 10 games.

• Washington ranks first in the NHL with a plus-69 goal differential.

• Jordan Weal (upper-body injury) is expected to miss his second straight game.