The Ten Worst Philly Sports Losses of 2011

The Ten Worst Philly Sports Losses of 2011

Hate to say it, but it's pretty undeniable—2011 was way more about the crushing losses than the inspiring wins. Disappointing regular-season performances, heartbreaking playoff no-shows, sweeps and shutouts and all that bad stuff, adding up to making '11 way more "Rolling in the Deep" than "Party Rock Anthem" for Philly pro sports fan. Still, as any native of the City of Brotherly Love will tell you, the losing is just as much a part of the true culture here than the winning, and probably more so, so it never hurts (well, of course it hurts, but yeah) to get back to our roots every so often. Here were the ten losses of 2011 that most reminded us what it really feels like to be a Philly sports fan.

[see our 25 Best Wins of 2011 post here]

Blurbs written by various members of the Level staff...

10. Temple Loses to SDSU in the Second Round of the NCAAs, Mar. 19

All things considered, this wasn't a "bad loss" as much as it just stung like all hell. Temple, without two key starters in Scootie Randall and Michael Eric (the same two guys they're missing right now, by the way), had advanced from the first (now second) round for the first time in their last four attempts and was looking to push Fran Dunphy into weekend number two of the tournament for the first time in his coaching career. Taking a two-seed like San Diego State to double-overtime with a depleted roster felt in some ways like a moral victory, but as guard Khalif Wyatt so often reminds his Temple teammates and their supporters, "There are no moral victories."

9. Union Lose 1-0 to Dynamo in First-Ever Playoff Game, Nov. 3

It was impressive to even be in the MLS postseason in their second year, but their showing left a lot to be desired. The most frustrating part of the game was the curious lineup Peter Nowak put out there—down a goal heading into the second leg, Nowak partnered Danny Mwanga and Jack McInereny, the first time they were ever paired in a starting role. We still can't wait for March, but in that game we saw that more improvements would be necessary for this to become an elite team. Losing in the playoffs is a Philly tradition we'd like to avoid with this club if possible.

8. Eagles' Come-From-Ahead Loss Against the 49ers, Oct. 2

When the Eagles needed a win most after an unexpected 1-2 start, the Niners appeared to be just what the doctor ordered. Philadelphia had jumped out to a 23-3 lead by the third quarter, even despite Ronnie Brown's season-defining backward pass on the goal line, but the defense began to cave in the second half. Suddenly San Francisco was moving the football up and down the field, while rookie kicker Alex Henery missed a pair of makeable field goals that would have put the game out of reach. The final kick in the teeth came on the Eagles' last chance, when a hustling Justin Smith chased down Jeremy Maclin from behind and punched the ball free to secure a 24-23 victory. The Birds didn't get back on track until it was far too late, while the surprising 49ers went on to clinch a postseason bye.

7. Sixers Lose to Pistons to Clinch .500 Season, Apr. 13

After this game, the Sixers went on to lose four of five games to the Miami Heat in the first round of the playoffs—but none of those losses hurt as bad as this. The 41-40 Sixers faced the roster-depleted 30-51 Pistons at home in their last chance to clinch a winning record for the season (their first in over a half-decade), giving us some concrete evidence (however minimal) that this Sixers squad was different than the one-and-done wonders of '07 and '08. But Rodney Stuckey carved them up (29 points on 9-15), and despite stellar offensive performances from Jrue Holiday (21 and 7) and Evan Turner (18-7-6), it came down to a Jason Kapono three in the corner for the game, and like every single other big shot he ever took for the Sixers, he missed. Same old 41-41 Sixers.

6. Penn State Loses to Nebraska After Sandusky Scandal, Nov. 12

If we're being honest, the Nittany Lions' loss to Nebraska was not, in and of itself, the issue. The team was expected to struggle down the stretch—with their last three games as their three toughest tests—so their loss to a talented Nebraska opponent wasn't altogether shocking. What was shocking was the events of the week leading up to the game, which, frankly, are still too fresh for us to feel the need revisit here in any detail. But from the allegations to the student rioting to ultimate dismissal coach Joe Paterno, the Saturday afternoon loss on Penn State's Senior Day was an unfortunate end to the university's most unfortunate week.

5. Flyers Swept By Bruins, May 6

One year after the amazing comeback of winning a series after being down 3-0 in a playoff series, the Flyers were once again down 3-0, but went out with a 5-1 debacle to cap one of the most disappointing seasons in Flyers history. Losses of 7-3, 3-2, 5-1, and 5-1 ended the Richards & Carter era with a whimper. Tim Thomas was the glowing example of what the Flyers hadn't had in decades—a goalie who could carry a team to a Cup. The Flyers, meanwhile, couldn't even decide who should start throughout the playoffs. Even more painful, there were rumors that the Flyers and Bruins had a deal on the table that would have made Thomas a Flyer the previous year, in exchange for the now expendable Carter. This series as much as anything likely led to the dismantling of the team and a big-money, long-years contract offered to a goalie they hoped could be the one.

4. Eagles Unforgivable Loss to Arizona, Nov. 13

By the time the Cardinals came to town, the Eagles already needed plenty of help if they were going to make the playoffs -- but that's what the Cardinals were for, wasn't it? With Arizona relying on backup quarterback John Skelton, the game was supposed to be a breeze. In the end, the Birds came down with a case of the Larry Fitzgeralds. At one point, the All Pro wide receiver snared three deflected passes on the same drive, including a touchdown reception. Meanwhile, Mike Vick suffered some broken ribs on the opening drive, and with this knowledge, for some ungodly reason Andy Reid shied away from the run as LeSean McCoy averaged nearly six yards per carry. In the end, Juan Castillo's defense blew their fifth fourth-quarter lead on the season, effectively pissing away the club's final playoff hopes with a 21-17 loss.

It also spurred the famous Angry Greg Ryan rant. So.

3. Phillies' Game Two vs. Cardinals, Oct. 2

Cliff Lee with a four-run lead? Yeah, we'll take our chances, thanks. No one would admit it, but most of the Philly Phaithful in attendance and watching at home had to be chalking up Game Two as an almost-certain win after the Phils scored four runs in the first two innings, with one of the best post-season pitchers of the 21st century taking the hill for our side. But the $120 million man faltered, letting up three runs in the fourth inning, the tying in the sixth and the go-ahead in the seventh on an Allen Craig single—a lead the Cardinals would hold, knotting the series at 1-1. As the series headed back to St. Louis, the creeping doubt was undeniable—if we couldn't hold that kind of lead with Cliff Lee on the mound, then this series certainly packed the potential for true disaster.

2. Eagles Lose Wild Card Game to Packers, Jan. 9

As absolutely incredible as Michael Vick's first full season as the Eagles' QB1 was, the momentum had certainly started to sputter by the time of the post-season—as a certain Tuesday night game in Minnesota made abundantly clear—and going into their Wild Card matchup against the 10-6, injured-but-finally-getting-healthy Green Bay Packers, nobody could feel all too confident that we were the better team. The early results on the field were not promising—Vick was mostly contained, LeSean McCoy was all but bottled up, and surefooted David Akers missed two makeable field goals. Still, the Eagles were driving in the fourth quarter with a chance to win it, until Vick threw a jump ball in the end zone that was cleanly picked off by Tramon Williams. The Packers went on to win the Super Bowl, the Eagles put their pride before the fall in the 2011 regular season, and, of course, Akers broke just about every regular-season record for a kicker in his first year with the 49ers.

1. Phillies Get Shut Out in Game Five vs. Cardinals, Oct. 7

The hardest part about losing this series-decider to the Cardinals—well, one of the hardest parts—was watching all the idiot pundits on ESPN and SI and whatnot have the temerity afterwards to refer to this game as a "classic." A classic?? Didn't they realize that the Phillies scored zero runs in this game?? Didn't they realize that we totally wasted an all-time studly performance by Roy Halladay because our once-mighty offense couldn't manage more than three hits in nine innings against Chris Carpenter? Didn't they realize that we wouldn't even have been playing this game if we could have held that four-run lead with Cliff Lee in Game Two, or if Roy Oswalt hadn't let David Freese tee off on him in Game Four? Didn't they realize that this might bring about the death of the Era of Good Times at Citizens Bank Park?? Didn't they realize that the world was coming to an end because we couldn't score one f'ing run against this f'ing team that only got to October at all because we swept their closest competitor at home in three meaningless games just because WE WERE THAT F'ING GOOD????

Yeah, this game was a classic all right. Put it on an MLB Network marathon block with Game Six of the '93 World Series, Game Three of the '77 NLCS, and all ten games of the '64 Philly Phold. We've got our popcorn microwaved already.

Phillies-Rockies 5 things: Jerad Eickhoff looking for consistency vs. Rockies' potent offense

Phillies-Rockies 5 things: Jerad Eickhoff looking for consistency vs. Rockies' potent offense

Phillies (15-26) vs. Rockies (28-17)
Coverage starts at  6:30 p.m. on CSN; streaming live on CSNPhilly.com and the NBC Sports App

The Phillies return home after a disastrous 2-7 road trip to host the NL West-leading Colorado Rockies in a four-game split.

Jerad Eickhoff gets the start for the Phils and is coming off of his best start in a month, but has a tough matchup vs. the Rockies’ potent offense.

Here are five things to know:

1. Like the old Eick
Eickhoff has been the model of consistency for Phillies pitchers since he joined the club in 2015, with 31 quality starts (six or more innings with no more than three earned runs) in 49 career games. But Eickhoff struggled recently, before regaining his form in his last start at Texas.

In his three prior starts — vs. the Dodgers, Cubs and Mariners — Eickhoff averaged just 4.2 innings per start as his ERA ballooned to 4.76. But the righty seemed to regain his form vs. the Rangers in his last start, a six-inning, two-earned-run outing.

Building off of that step will be a tall task, though against an explosive Rockies lineup.

2. Better hitters than Rocky
The hard-hitting Rockies are coming to town.

Colorado boasts one of the league’s best offenses, ranking fourth in runs scored, 10th in home runs and fifth in extra-base hits. Take the Rockies out of the thin air at Coors Field, and the numbers tell a different story, though. On the road, Colorado drops to 12th in runs, 14th in homers and 10th in extra-base hits. Still solid numbers, but nothing that jumps off the page at you. The Phillies (as bad as they are on the road) have more extra-base hits.

The Rockies are led by Mark Reynolds (yes, that Mark Reynolds), with 12 homers and 39 RBI. Shockingly, Reynolds — who has set the all-time single-season strikeout record in a season — is leading the team with a .323 batting average. 

Just about the only thing you don’t have to worry about with the Rockies’ offense is their speed. The Rockies rank dead last in MLB with just 11 steals on the year. 

3. Not the same old Rockies
Despite the dip in numbers on the road, the Rockies are still 15-7 on the road this season, the second-best mark in MLB, behind only the Astros.

What’s different about this year’s team, unlike years past, is the pitching. This year, they’re a middling staff, which is actually a huge improvement for the club. Last season, Rockies pitchers ranked in the bottom five in MLB in almost all categories: 27th in ERA (4.91), 28th in runs allowed (860) and 28th in opponent batting average (.274), just to name a few.

This year, the Rockies have knocked off nearly half a run per game (4.48 ERA) and rank 13th in the entire league with a .250 opponent batting average. With an offense like theirs, a middling pitching staff could be all the Rockies need to earn a postseason bid.

4. Oh, 'Dubel
What’s happened to Odubel Herrera?

After an All-Star 2016 season, Herrera has been one of the Phillies’ biggest disappointments in 2017. Batting just .236 on the year, Herrera is on pace to easily set a career high in strikeouts (168) and career lows in runs (60) and extra-base hits (39). Not a good look for Herrera after signing a five-year deal to be a building block of the future in the offseason. However, there is hope: In his career, Herrera has increased his batting average, runs scored and OPS each month as the season has gone along. 

5. This and that
•Jeff Hoffman will make a spot start for the Rockies on Monday. He’s the Rockies' third-ranked prospect by Baseball America and has a 4.97 ERA with 32 strikeouts and 19 walks in 10 career MLB games. Batters are hitting .282 off him this season.

•Eickhoff’s numbers have risen with Cameron Rupp behind the plate. With Rupp catching, Eickhoff has a 3.53 ERA as opposed to a 3.13 ERA with Carlos Ruiz catching.

•After a red-hot start to the month, Aaron Altherr has cooled off over the last week, hitting just .231 with more strikeouts (five) than RBI (four). 

NBA Playoffs: Avery Bradley's buzzer-beating 3 lifts Celtics past Cavaliers in Game 3

NBA Playoffs: Avery Bradley's buzzer-beating 3 lifts Celtics past Cavaliers in Game 3

BOX SCORE

CLEVELAND -- Leprechauns are imaginary. Celtic pride is very real.

Avery Bradley's 3-pointer danced on the rim and dropped with less than a second left and Boston, blown out in the first two games of the Eastern Conference finals and playing without star Isaiah Thomas, stunned the Cleveland Cavaliers 111-108 on Sunday night in Game 3 to end the champions' 13-game postseason winning streak.

Bradley's shot from the left wing -- off a play designed by coach Brad Stevens -- bounced on the rim four times before going down. It capped a furious, focused comeback by the Celtics, who trailed by 21 in the third quarter before rallying to tighten up a series that appeared to be over.

"Wide-open look," Bradley said. "Al (Horford) did a great job of getting me open and Marcus (Smart) made a great pass and I was able to knock down the shot."

Smart, who started in place of Thomas, made seven 3-pointers and scored 27 points, and Bradley had 20 for the Celtics, who were given little chance after losing by 44 in Game 2 and then losing Thomas for the rest of the postseason because of a hip injury.

"Everybody had to step up their game tonight especially with one of our brothers down," Smart said. "Our love and support goes out to Isaiah. We wish he could be here but we understand. We just kept fighting. Everybody did their part."

Kyrie Irving scored 29 points, and Kevin Love had 28 for Cleveland. The Cavaliers dropped to 10-1 in the postseason with their first loss since Game 4 of last year's Finals.

Game 4 is Tuesday night in Cleveland.

LeBron James had one of the worst games of his postseason career, finishing with 11 points and six turnovers.

"I didn't have it," said James. "You let a team like that grab momentum you almost knew a shot like that was going in."

Still, the Cavs were in control leading 77-56 in the third quarter after making 14 3-pointers in the first half. But Cleveland got complacent, Smart got hot and the Celtics, who arrived at Quicken Loans Arena on Sunday morning for their shootaround without Thomas and looking somewhat defeated, never gave up.

"We decided were going to go out and play hard, swinging." Bradley said. "We never counted ourselves out."

The Celtics caught the Cavs at 95-all on Smart's 3-pointer and then matched the James and Co. basket for basket in the final minutes in one of the most entertaining games of what has been a mostly boring postseason.

Boston's Jonas Jerebko's baseline jumper put the Celtics ahead 108-106 with 30 seconds left before Irving scored on a drive to tie it with 10.7 seconds left.

Following a timeout, the Celtics perfectly executed a play drawn up by Stevens and worked the ball to Bradley, who found himself open and then calmly knocked down a shot that goes straight into Celtics lore.

For Cleveland, the loss was a wake-up call on their march toward a possible third straight Finals and a seemingly inevitable rematch with Golden State. The Cavs had been playing a glorified game of H.O.R.S.E. with the Warriors, who are undefeated and can complete a sweep of San Antonio on Monday night.

The Cavs hadn't lost since Game 4 of last year's Finals, and they came in tied with the 1988-89 Los Angeles "Showtime" Lakers for the longest winning streak in postseason history.

With Thomas back home, the Celtics could be forgiven for feeling down after Thomas, their inspirational leader was shut down with a hip injury he first sustained in March.

However, Stevens liked his team's energy leading up to tipoff and felt confident they would play hard.

"Our guys are itching to play," he said. "Obviously, we're here for a reason, and we've got tough-minded, competitive guys who have largely been guys that have had to really earn their way up in this league."

They earned their way back into the series.

Tip-ins
Celtics: Stevens said Thomas will visit hip specialists over the next few days and there's a chance the 28-year-old will need surgery. ... Stevens didn't review much of the Game 2 tape, but there's a mental image in his head of the Cavs making tough shot after tough shot that he can't shake. "As good as they are and they are tremendous, that might have been the best game I've ever seen a team play against us," he said. Does that mean college too? "Yeah, I think they would have beaten all those teams, too," he said, drawing laughter. ...

Cavaliers: James came in needing 73 points to pass Michael Jordan as the top scorer in postseason history. ... Cavs coach Tyronn Lue was an assistant in Boston and said his team reminds him of those Celtics teams with Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce and Rajon Rondo. "That was a tight group," he said. "They did everything together, dinners and everything." ... Cleveland is 14-0 when leading a series 2-0. ... Browns defensive end Myles Garrett, the No. 1 overall pick in this year's NFL draft, and fellow rookie Jabrill Peppers took a few shots on the floor before teams came out for warmups.