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Joel Embiid on killing lions as a kid, Ben Simmons' recovery, and Donald Trump

Joel Embiid on killing lions as a kid, Ben Simmons' recovery, and Donald Trump

Joel Embiid is legitimately hilarious. We've seen it on Twitter for a long time now. And we're starting to see it more and more in his interactions with his teammates and the media.

This wasn't something that happened overnight. Embiid has been having fun for a long time.

We were reminded of one such story thanks to Adrian Wojnarowski of The Vertical sitting down with Embiid and Sixers coach Brett Brown for his podcast.

One of the questions Woj asked Joel was about the perceptions Americans had of him as a young man coming to the United States from his native Cameroon to play basketball.

"When they think about Africans, they think about us just running around with lions and tigers and all those other animals. When I got to Kansas, I kind of used that to my advantage, talking about how I killed a lion. That's how I became a man, because when I was six years old I had to go into the jungle and kill a lion and carry it on my back to bring back to my village."

"And they bought into it."

I mean, I probably would have believed him.

"The story might be true, it might be false," Embiid added. "Nobody would ever know now. If anybody tries me, they'll find out." 

But Embiid can have a serious side when he needs to. After having one of the best Tweets of election night about America tanking after Donald Trump won on Tuesday, he gave Woj a much more serious and thoughtful answer.

"Growing up in Cameroon, I always thought the U.S. was just amazing. It was just a dream. I thought it was heaven. And then coming here a couple years ago, the U.S. is still nice, but it's not like what I thought it was going to be. With the election going on and Donald Trump getting elected, I mean I don't usually get into politics but with the way he's been acting -- talking about racism and women -- it's hard to understand why people elected him. It just shows you the way people think. Racism isn't over and people are still behind him."

"I feel like it's not going to be as bad as people make it out to be. I hope it's not going to be like that."

There's plenty of other interesting stuff touched on as well. From Embiid's extremely trying rehab, to the death of his brother, to the fun he's having finally playing for the Sixers, and even how he's helping Ben Simmons deal with injury coming into the NBA.

"The main thing I've been telling him is patience. That patience is going to pay off. The first time I kind of rushed everything," Embiid said. "He has the team to back him up on that. Nobody is going to rush him."

You can listen to the full 45-minute podcast here.

The Giants targeted Eagles CB Jalen Mills a historic amount

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USA Today Images

The Giants targeted Eagles CB Jalen Mills a historic amount

If it felt as though Eagles cornerback Jalen Mills was involved in every other play against the Giants on Sunday, well, that’s actually not too far off.

We knew Mills saw a lot of action. He was shadowing Giants wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. for most of the afternoon, which is usually a sure sign a lot of footballs are going to come your way. One look at the box score can tell you Mills finished with a game-high 12 tackles.

That only tells part of the story. The Giants went after Mills so much, it made history.

Mills was targeted 21 times in coverage, according to Pro Football Focus – the highest number any cornerback has faced in over 10 years. PFF’s numbers only date back to 2006, but even if it’s only the most in the last decade, and not all-time, that’s still saying something in the increasingly pass-happy NFL.

To put that in perspective, Giants quarterback Eli Manning threw 47 passes total, so nearly half went to Mills’ man.

And how did Mills fare? Predictably, it was a mixed bag. Manning completed 71.4 percent of those attempts for 119 yards. Thirteen of those targets alone were for Beckham, who finished with nine receptions for 79 yards and two touchdowns.

When you put it like that, it sounds bad. However, the Eagles — Mills included — were playing a lot of off-man coverage and conceding routes underneath. So while Mills allowed a high volume of completions, those plays only amounted to 5.7 yards per attempt.

Granted, Beckham found the end zone twice. More often than not, Mills was limiting Giants receivers to short gains. In fact, the longest completion the second-year defensive back allowed went for 14 yards, as well as only 23 total yards after the catch.

"Besides those (two touchdowns), you always want them back in the red zone," Beckham said postgame. "Both were contested. Both were short. For the most part of the game, I think I played pretty well."

PFF described it as “death by a thousand paper cuts,” but it wasn’t Mills’ death at all. All things considered, he did pretty much what the banged-up Eagles defense needed him to do to secure a victory.

Giants WR Brandon Marshall allegedly spit on Eagles fan

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USA Today Images

Giants WR Brandon Marshall allegedly spit on Eagles fan

Odell Beckham pretended to urinate on the Eagles’ home field, but it was Giants wide receiver Brandon Marshall who may have crossed the line with his use of bodily fluids on Sunday.

Video shows the unidentified Eagles fan accuse Marshall of spitting on him amid a heated verbal exchange during pregame warmups. It’s unclear what compelled a six-time Pro Bowl selection to have words with some guy wearing a Randall Cunningham throwback jersey, but if Marshall did spit, it was after he was repeatedly challenged to a fight.

There is no visual confirmation as to whether Marshall spit on the man, either, as the footage appears to be shot on the first smart phone ever made. Marshall’s head does make a forward motion as if he were spitting. Then again, some people just have trouble controlling their saliva when they’re yelling, too, leaving open the small-percentage chance this was accidental spittle.

You be the judge.

Spit or not spit, it will be interesting to see if the Eagles and Lincoln Financial Field rethink their policy on allowing fans on the field before certain games after this little – ahem – spat.

(h/t Sporting News)