Joel Embiid on killing lions as a kid, Ben Simmons' recovery, and Donald Trump

Joel Embiid on killing lions as a kid, Ben Simmons' recovery, and Donald Trump

Joel Embiid is legitimately hilarious. We've seen it on Twitter for a long time now. And we're starting to see it more and more in his interactions with his teammates and the media.

This wasn't something that happened overnight. Embiid has been having fun for a long time.

We were reminded of one such story thanks to Adrian Wojnarowski of The Vertical sitting down with Embiid and Sixers coach Brett Brown for his podcast.

One of the questions Woj asked Joel was about the perceptions Americans had of him as a young man coming to the United States from his native Cameroon to play basketball.

"When they think about Africans, they think about us just running around with lions and tigers and all those other animals. When I got to Kansas, I kind of used that to my advantage, talking about how I killed a lion. That's how I became a man, because when I was six years old I had to go into the jungle and kill a lion and carry it on my back to bring back to my village."

"And they bought into it."

I mean, I probably would have believed him.

"The story might be true, it might be false," Embiid added. "Nobody would ever know now. If anybody tries me, they'll find out." 

But Embiid can have a serious side when he needs to. After having one of the best Tweets of election night about America tanking after Donald Trump won on Tuesday, he gave Woj a much more serious and thoughtful answer.

"Growing up in Cameroon, I always thought the U.S. was just amazing. It was just a dream. I thought it was heaven. And then coming here a couple years ago, the U.S. is still nice, but it's not like what I thought it was going to be. With the election going on and Donald Trump getting elected, I mean I don't usually get into politics but with the way he's been acting -- talking about racism and women -- it's hard to understand why people elected him. It just shows you the way people think. Racism isn't over and people are still behind him."

"I feel like it's not going to be as bad as people make it out to be. I hope it's not going to be like that."

There's plenty of other interesting stuff touched on as well. From Embiid's extremely trying rehab, to the death of his brother, to the fun he's having finally playing for the Sixers, and even how he's helping Ben Simmons deal with injury coming into the NBA.

"The main thing I've been telling him is patience. That patience is going to pay off. The first time I kind of rushed everything," Embiid said. "He has the team to back him up on that. Nobody is going to rush him."

You can listen to the full 45-minute podcast here.

Now a country music artist, ex-Phillie Brett Myers hopes to play in Philly

Now a country music artist, ex-Phillie Brett Myers hopes to play in Philly

Much like he was on the mound, Brett Myers is giving everything he has to create a name for himself in the music industry. And he is doing it by being his "own man." 

Unlike the mainstream pop-country that appears in your head when you think of the genre, Myers has set out to be different. When asked about the country music of today, Myers does not agree with the direction it is going. His first album, "Backwoods Rebel," describes the former Phillies’ starter and his music accurately — rebellious and unconventional. Myers’ music is country with a twist of rock but holds back from the mainstream pop country of today. 

“They kill it, don’t get me wrong,” Myers said this week in a phone interview with CSNPhilly.com. “But it’s not my cup of tea. Every song is about a girl and sitting on a tailgate. I think it is pop country that is out now. Country music is about songwriting and storytelling. I see these guys like Luke Bryan singing these songs, and I see they have six guys write the song. I mean, does it really take six guys to write a song? That frustrates me because I am a singer and songwriter. I live in this world. I don’t live in their fairytale world that they are singing about. 

"I think a lot of people want to listen to their music because it takes them away from their everyday life. But I want to write about everyday life stuff. I can only write about what I know and what I’ve seen. I don’t feel like this country music stuff we listen to today really grasps real-life stuff like country music is supposed to be.” 

For the last two years Myers has dedicated himself to this craft and produced two albums — he is working on his third. At first, it was strictly writing and no singing. The former pitcher was convinced to sing and now has the itch to play in front of live audiences.  

The end goal: get back to the City of Brotherly Love. 

“My main priority this year is to play a couple shows in Philly,” Myers said. “That’s all I want to do is play a show at the Fillmore or one of those venues they have in Philly. I know half the people there would come to watch me suck. And the other half would come to see me (do well). That’s the way Philly is and I am perfectly OK with it. I would enjoy it.”

The misconception with Myers’ post-retirement career is most people do not see it as a serious endeavor. He wants to clear the air. Myers is as serious as it can be when it comes to his music, but he still hasn't had the chance to play in a big venue in Philadelphia. 

He has played a few shows in Florida — his home state — but knows Philadelphia is his best chance to validate his music career. 

“The two shows we’ve done, I can tell you we don’t suck,” Myers said. “I got two guys from ‘Puddle of Mudd’ in the band. An original member from ‘Shinedown’ in the band. These guys have platinum records on their walls. And I think to myself, 'Why would they be a part of this if they thought it sucked?'"

He does not want a promotional team behind him; instead, he wants to go against the grain and make it in the industry on his own. 

“Twitter, Instagram, try to do some podcasts here and there,” Myers said. “My buddies have a syndicated radio show that I go on and put my music on. A couple people in Philly have written articles about when I first came out with my album. Good or bad.

“With the second album, I didn’t get the same publicity as the first because it wasn’t a shock. So not many people know it’s been out since August. I am working on the third one now, but this is why I need to play live (for more publicity).”

As he did with baseball, Myers doesn’t do this because he wants to make money. He loves it.

“I’m not going to do it if doesn’t make sense," he said. "Because I’m doing it for nothing. I’m putting my own money into this thing, but my band is not going to play for free. If I can make enough money to pay them and pay for our expenses. I don’t care if I make a dollar out of this.

“I want to create my own genre. Meaning I am southern rock and country, that’s how I classify my music. I don’t just say, 'Yeah I’m a country music artist’ or whatever. Because I know I am not mainstream country. That’s what people think country is right now, pop country. I don’t offer that and I never will. I don’t believe in selling out to make a dollar. I’m writing this for me and people who want to enjoy it.”

Country music and his children have his full attention these days, which makes it is hard for Myers to keep up with his old team. He did offer some words about the front office dealing with the young players and how there is always a chance the Phillies could surprise people in this season. 

“Honestly I don't know what their clubhouse personalities are so I really couldn't tell you if they have the same similarities," he said. "But you know, we were that young team coming up. It took us a while to figure it out, but Pat Gillick and his team put together a great group of personalities with a good mixture of young talent and veterans.

“I wish them the best, but you never know what the season has in store for anyone. Teams look good on paper then can't perform on the field. That's what makes baseball so great you never know what's going to happen. It's just so unpredictable.”

Mike Trout responds to Chris Christie's comments about Philly fans

Mike Trout responds to Chris Christie's comments about Philly fans

Earlier this week, Chris Christie took it upon himself to call out the entire city of Philadelphia as well as the Phillies. Christie went on to say how the Phillies have an "angry, bitter fan base" and that Philadelphia is filled with "awful, angry people."

A day later, Phillies legend Larry Bowa fired back at Christie with a few jabs of his own, even inviting the New Jersey governer to "come down here and take a few ground balls."

It now seems like Mike Trout has taken offense to Christie's comments as well. Trout, who is from Millville, New Jersey, and bleeds Eagles green, was asked about the New Jersey governer's comments Saturday at a press conference.

"As an Eagles fan, we're passionate about the team and we want them to win and to do good," Trout said, per Jerry Crasnick of ESPN. "In sports in general, [Phillies fans] love their teams."

In typical Philadelphia fashion, Trout couldn't help but take a dig at Christie for his Cowboys fandom.

"I think he's a Cowboys fan, right?" Trout said of Christie. "I was sorry to hear that."