Tug McGraw said 'Ya gotta believe' with the Phillies, too

Tug McGraw said 'Ya gotta believe' with the Phillies, too

A sure sign that it's February in the sports world are the manufactured controversies that often lack substance but are designed to stoke responses. For example, take the faux outrage accumulating over the use of Tug McGraw's immortal 'Ya gotta believe' on the freshly painted walls that adorn the Phillies' hallway at Spectrum Field in Clearwater.

Note that Phillies beat writer Todd Zolecki for MLB.com didn't seem to find anything amiss about the location of the famous quote. Yet as Tyler Kepner for the New York Times writes, McGraw's saying actually originated as a rallying cry for the Mets in 1973, a fact that some outlets are beginning to seize upon for a good laugh — including the NL East rival itself.

There's no denying McGraw first uttered those words while he was a member of the Mets. Check.

Although, as Kepner points out, McGraw continued using the slogan for years after joining the Phillies in 1975, to the point where it became a personal mantra of his. In fact, the words are inscribed on a plaque in the home team's bullpen at Citizens Bank Park. Check.

But wait, there's more!

Even though McGraw made the words famous as a Met, the Phillies have a better claim to his legacy. McGraw pitched longer for the Phillies than he did for the Mets and made his home in the Philadelphia area, working at a local television station in the 1990s and serving as a spring instructor for the Phillies.

And while McGraw was a vital member of the 1969 Mets, he did not actually pitch in that World Series. In 1980, with the Phillies, he had a win and two saves against the Kansas City Royals, and struck out Willie Wilson for the final out.

Checkmate.

The Phillies may not own McGraw's quote, but the Mets sure as heck don't, either. It's safe to say the walls at Spectrum Field are perfectly acceptable just the way they are.

Associated Press photo

Joel Embiid is the Joel Embiid of trash talking

Joel Embiid is the Joel Embiid of trash talking

Joel Embiid was back in the gym on Wednesday afternoon after enjoying his All-Star break down in New Orleans and appears like he's ready to get back out on the court this weekend.

“I hope that they’re going let me play,” Embiid said after practice on Wednesday. “I feel great. I want to play. If it was my decision, I’d be playing.”

The team doctor's aren't so sure. Joel is currently listed as doubtful for both of the Sixers games this weekend.

But that didn't stop JoJo from talking some smack with one of his favorite teammates, Dario Saric, while battling in a little one-on-one after practice.

Embiid was seen by reporters using some colorful language directed in Saric's direction, screaming "you can't ****-ing guard me!" while the two went at it.

The chatter didn't stop there. Embiid was later asked about the one-on-one and unleashed a little more on Dario.

"He don't like playing me," Embiid said. "He never wins and he doesn't handle me talking trash to him. I would love to play against him all the time because that gives me a lot of confidence beating him every day."

"It's fun playing against him. We both like to compete."

"That's my guy," he added.

And Sixers fans love them both. Let's just hope to see more of them teaming up in actual games soon.

1992 interview between Donald Trump and Randall Cunningham surfaces

1992 interview between Donald Trump and Randall Cunningham surfaces

Philadelphia Magazine's Dan McQuade unearthed a YouTube video of a 1992 interview former Eagles quarterback Randall Cunningham did with real estate tycoon Donald Trump from his short-lived interview special titled Randall Cunningham’s Celebrity Rap.

Apparently, it was a show on WCAU where Cunningham sat down with random celebrities. As McQuade points out, it is pretty weird.

And one of those celebrities just so happened to go on to become president of the United States.

There isn't a whole lot about sports. Trump briefly mentions Randall's career with the Eagles and also discusses Mike Tyson and his rape conviction. Trump appears sympathetic to Tyson's struggles.

Mostly it's a puff piece in which Trump talks somewhat aimlessly from topic to topic. If you don't want to waste 15 minutes watching it, Philly Mag summarized the most bizarre moments