Union v. Dynamo, Leg Two: WWPD?

Union v. Dynamo, Leg Two: WWPD?

The Union head into tonight’s second leg of the MLS Eastern Conference Semifinals (8:30/ESPN2) against the Houston Dynamo down a goal. Outscore the Dyanmo by two goals in regulation and they’ll advance to the Conference Finals. Outscore the Dynamo by one goal in regulation and they’ll force a 30 minute overtime (there is no “golden goal”). If the two teams remain tied on aggregate after the 30 minute overtime then the winner will be determined by penalty kicks.

The real question heading into this match is what in the world is Peter Nowak going to do with his lineup? Honestly, it’s a total crapshoot. Part of me thinks that he pencils in the eight regulars (Faryd Mondragon, Sheanon Williams, Danny Califf, Carlos Valdes, Gabriel Farfan, Brian Carroll, Michael Farfan, and Sebastien Le Toux) and then in a fit of Jackson Pollack-esque inspiration he throws three random names on the team sheet.

If I were smarter and had more business savvy I’d market WWPD (“What Would Peter Do”) rubber bracelets and t-shirts. At this point, asking What Would Peter Do, as it relates to his choice of players and formation, is just as existential a question as the original WWJD.

The guy has had tremendous success wherever he’s been. He knows what he’s doing. But what does it say about him (or me for that matter) that I wouldn’t put it past him, despite entering the game down a goal, to trot out a 6-3-1 and give never-been-used Joe Tait a starting nod?

I am done trying to guess what he’s going to do. All I know is that his team needs to find a way to score at least one more goal than Houston tonight. How would I go about doing that? Glad you asked.

As I mentioned, there are arguably three open spots in the starting eleven. I can say with 100% certainty that I would not start Stefani Miglioranzi. Can I coach, or can I coach? Beyond that, you need to balance the need to score goals with the reality that you really can’t afford to concede any either.

As much as I’d love to let Freddy Adu and Roger Torres loose for 90 minutes, I think you’d be giving up too much defensively. If forced to start just one of those two, I’d opt for Torres. You won’t find a bigger Adu fan than me, but I prefer Torres’ ability to pull the strings from the center of the pitch.

Adu is an ideal weapon to bring off the bench in the 65th minute. You can plug him in along the flank and let him utilize his ability to break defenders down 1 v. 1 and provide dangerous service into the box.

So, with Torres in my starting lineup I have two spots left. As frustrating as he is, I’d give Justin Mapp another start. It’s a roll of the dice, but he could just as easily be invisible for 70+ minutes, or he could score two golazos and singlehandedly push the Union into the Conference Finals. He’s that hit-or-miss.

The third and final spot comes down to the ineffective Danny Mwanga, the returning from injury Veljko Paunovic, and the diminutive Jack McInerney. Much has been written about the height advantage the Dynamo have over the Union. This disparity was on display Sunday when the Union stubbornly insisted on trying to beat the Dynamo back line with balls in the air.

Yes, Jack McInerney flicked a header off of the crossbar on Sunday, but I’d rather take my chances against the Dynamo by keeping the ball on the ground. Assuming they make a concerted effort to keep the ball on the ground I’d start McInerney and bring Mwanga off of the bench. Although, Nowak loves Paunovic, so don’t be surprised to see him start.

Tactically, I’d deploy these eleven starters in a standard 4-4-2. I’d give Gabe Farfan and Sheanon Williams the green light to get forward with the understanding that marking Brad Davis and shutting down his service is of the utmost importance.

Finally, Robertson Stadium is an absolute nightmare. You’ll see all kinds of lines across the field (soccer lines, football lines, field hockey lines, rugby lines, badminton lines, clothing lines, etc.), which make for a total television eyesore.

Aesthetics aside, the field is incredibly narrow. As a Union fan you’ve got to hope that the narrow pitch means that Union will be less vulnerable to the sort of heels-on-the-touchline width provided by Davis.

If the Union have any chance of advancing they’ll need to keep the ball on the ground, win the aerial battles in their own box, limit Houston’s set pieces, and finish. Dynamo keeper Tally Hall was credited with ten saves on Sunday. The U need to find a way finish those chances.

Starting Lineup I’d Like to See – As detailed above: Mondragon, Williams, Califf, Valdes, G. Farfan, M. Farfan, Carroll, Torres, Mapp, Le Toux, McInerney.

Final Score Prediction: I cannot get a read on this game. The Union are 2-0 all-time in Houston. Sure, there’s pressure on them, but as a second-year franchise they are not expected to win this game. Maybe they come out loose and play some free-flowing soccer. I foresee a scenario where the Union play well, score an early goal, and then get caught going for it late. The game ends 1-1, and Houston advances 3-2 on aggregate.

The Toni Stahl Memorial Player Most Likely to See Red: N/A (retired for the playoffs) 

Yankees 9, Phillies 4: Cameron Perkins comes out swinging

Yankees 9, Phillies 4: Cameron Perkins comes out swinging

TAMPA -- The Phillies’ bats were slow getting started in the Grapefruit League opener Friday afternoon. The Phils did not have a baserunner through the first six innings in a 9-4 loss to the New York Yankees at Steinbrenner Field.

“First game, I’m just happy we got at-bats because the pitching is always ahead of the hitting this early,” Phillies manager Pete Mackanin said afterward.

Outfielder Cameron Perkins had the Phillies’ first hit, a single up the middle in the seventh inning. He added a solo homer in the ninth inning.

Perkins, 26, was the Phillies’ sixth-round pick in the 2012 draft out of Purdue University. He graduated from Southport High School in Indianapolis, the same school that produced Phillies great and Hall of Famer Chuck Klein.

A right-hander hitter who eschews batting gloves, Perkins hit .292 with eight homers and 47 RBIs at Triple A Lehigh Valley last season. He is not on the 40-man roster but was invited to camp for a look-see. He is considered a longshot to win a spot on the Phillies’ bench, but will certainly improve his chances if he keeps swinging it like he did Friday.

“I don’t think about it,” Perkins said of his bid to make the club. “All I can do is what I did today -- get my opportunity and make the most of it.”

Brock Stassi, another candidate for a job on the Phillies’ bench, also homered.

On the pitching side
Right-hander Alec Asher, who projects to open in the Triple A rotation, started for the Phils. He pitched two innings, allowed a home run to Didi Gregorius and struck out two.

Asher made big strides with his sinker last season. He’s added a cutter now.

Right-hander Nick Pivetta debuted with two scoreless innings. He gave up a hit, walked one and struck out three. The Phillies acquired Pivetta from Washington from Jonathan Papelbon in July 2015. He projects to open in the Triple A rotation, but first will pitch for Team Canada in the WBC in March.

“It’s a lifelong dream for me, right up there with whenever it is that I get my first start with the Phillies,” Pivetta said.

The bullpen
Mackanin has said he’d like to have two left-handed relievers in his bullpen. The Phillies have just one -- Joely Rodriguez -- on their 40-man roster, although it’s possible that Adam Morgan could be shifted from starter to reliever later in camp.

The Phils have brought two veteran lefties -- Sean Burnett and Cesar Ramos -- into camp on minor-league deals to compete for a job. Burnett made his debut Friday and gave up a triple, a sacrifice fly and a home run in his inning of work.

Luis Garcia was tagged for four hits and three runs in his spring debut.

Up next
The Phillies host the Yankees in Clearwater on Saturday afternoon. Morgan will start for the Phils against right-hander Adam Warren.

A Q & A with Siera Santos

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A Q & A with Siera Santos

What experience had the biggest impact on your life and career in sports and why? 
I’m often asked why I chose to be in sports broadcasting and the answer is not exactly brief. Most people aren’t familiar with my backstory. While I prefer to tell it face-to-face, here it is in a nutshell: Throughout high school, I had a lot of “problems” (that’s the gentle way of putting it). I didn’t graduate and instead got my GED while I was in a treatment center in Utah. That summer when I returned home to Arizona, I needed a healthy distraction and, although I had always been a casual Arizona Diamondbacks and Phoenix Suns fan, I started watching games every day and reading the sports section with my dad over our morning cup of coffee.

When the NBA season started, I begged my dad for season tickets. This was the Nash/Stoudemire/Marion era and tickets were incredibly expensive. While we didn’t get season tickets that year, we went to several regular season and playoff games. Next season rolled around and, once again, I pleaded with my dad to get us season tickets. He finally broke down and bought a half-season package. We went to nearly every other game. I knew at that point that I wanted to go to games for the rest of my life. I enrolled in community college for the spring with my heart set on getting a degree in broadcast journalism. Not only did Suns games change the course of my future, but they also repaired my relationship with my dad. 

Who’s had the biggest impact and why?  
It’s difficult to single out one person. Obviously my parents' unwavering support got me where I am today. If I had to name someone who is currently a mentor-figure in my life, it would definitely be Jesse Sanchez from MLB Network. He always checks in to make sure I’m OK (in both my career and personal life), and he’s given me invaluable feedback and advice. There aren’t many Latinos working in sports media at national level and he encourages me to embrace who I am. 

What are some of the funniest moments you’ve experienced as a woman in sports?
When I tell people I’m a sports broadcaster, the immediate follow-up question tends to be: “Oh, so you like sports?” It’s tough to not respond with something sarcastic so I usually say, “Nope! I hate them!” I just don’t think it’s a question that you would ask a man in sports broadcasting. 

What was the most negative moment you’ve experienced ... the one that got you fired up or perhaps made you think about quitting?
Overall, most of my interactions are very positive and the majority of athletes are professionals. But I did have an issue with one player who was unbelievably disrespectful. He had been inappropriate on two previous occasions and I dreaded having to crowd around his locker to do interviews with him after games. I stopped asking him questions and after one of the scrums, he said: “If you’re not going to ask any questions, move your ass to the back.” My cameraman was still rolling and the mic was still hot. It was caught on video. Eventually, the issue was resolved with the support of my superiors. However, the entire ordeal was embarrassing and made my job more difficult. 
 
Have you had any teachable moments, i.e. someone made an ignorant comment, but had no idea you were offended – until you said something?
Double-checking the pronunciation of names that I’m not familiar with has been a priority. If you slip-up on a name, viewers will crucify you. Most male broadcasters will be forgiven for a mispronunciation, but it’s not necessarily the same for women. 

Any awkward moments?  
Whenever an athlete crosses the line and tries to be flirtatious or ask for a date. It doesn’t happen as often as you’d think, but it’s still uncomfortable. 

What are you most proud of?
I’m often asked “Well, what’s next?” The truth is I’m very happy with where I am. My end goal was to be a team reporter for a regional sports network and that’s exactly what I’m doing. I live in an amazing city and I love what I do. After I dropped out of high school, I never thought I would make it this far, much less graduate college. I’m incredibly grateful to be here and I’m proud of where I am.

A lot of girls look up to you and aspire to be on TV covering sports. What is the most important message you want to send to them?
Be someone that people enjoy working with and being around. Always be open to feedback. Don’t be afraid to ask questions if you’re not 100 percent sure. Oh, and don’t post anything on social media that you wouldn’t want your grandma to see.