Vick Didn't Want to Come to Philly, and I Don't Blame Him

Vick Didn't Want to Come to Philly, and I Don't Blame Him

There may not be a professional athlete alive today that can invoke a full spectrum of emotions the way Michael Vick can. Many fans want to cheer, others want to boo, while professional football players all want to be in the same locker room as Vick, and reporters all want their exclusive interview.

Will Leitch was the latest to catch up with the most polarizing figure in the NFL for the upcoming edition of GQ, and of course there is no shortage of delving into the Pro Bowl quarterback's criminal past. Vick also talked about his decision to sign with the Eagles though, admitting he didn't necessarily want to wear midnight green--as if it were some sort of bombshell.

"I think I can say this now, because it's not going to hurt anybody's feelings, and it's the truth... I didn't want to come to Philadelphia. Being the third-team quarterback is nothing to smile about. Cincinnati and Buffalo were better options."

It's a line that's already garnered quite a bit of attention, but why would this have been his first choice? At the time, Donovan McNabb was still firmly entrenched as the franchise quarterback, and if something happened to Five, the coaches were also high on Kevin Kolb. When the Eagles signed Vick, there didn't appear to be even a remote path that would lead him to become the starting quarterback here.

Furthermore, it shouldn't really come as any surprise Vick wasn't overly thrilled with the situation, considering he had an escape plan built in to his first contract. The two-year deal was structured in such a way that the Eagles either needed to trade or release Vick after one season, otherwise they owed him a hefty bonus that would drive up the cost much higher than normal for a reserve quarterback.

It just so happened by that time, no serious suitors remained. There simply wasn't much of a market for Vick in 2010, and after shipping McNabb to Washington, Andy Reid suddenly had a need for a veteran backup behind the unproven Kolb. The rest is history.

Even before that though, Vick made it perfectly clear he wouldn't be satisfied spending another season primarily on the bench, occasionally subbing in to run a handful of Wildcat plays. Asked during last year's off-season if he could reprise that role, Vick responded:

"It would be a tough decision to make. I would really have to take a lot of things into consideration. The fact that I want to be a starter."

"[If] another opportunity presented itself, it would be even better."

Meanwhile, Leitch's article goes on to suggest Vick may have been steered toward Philadelphia, which both the quarterback and the league have quickly come out and denied. If Cincinnati or Buffalo did in fact have offers on the table for Vick, based on his not-so-hidden agenda, it's not difficult to understand why he might have preferred those scenarios.

With that in mind, it's also difficult not to get the feeling Vick's choice was influenced by somebody close to him. Everything he has said and done seemed largely motivated by his goal of regaining his status as a superstar QB in the NFL. While the best possible destination for him was almost undoubtedly in Philly, where the only immediate pressure was on improving, the fastest possible route would have been someplace where there was less stability.

What's truly important today is not how Vick felt about signing here at the time, but that he recognizes how critical the correct decision was for rehabilitating his career. He could've gone and played right away somewhere else, but not likely ever enjoy the success--team or individual--he is poised to have with the Eagles in 2011. Thankfully, Vick really seems to understand that now.

"The problem was that I wasn't given the liberty to do certain things when I was young. The reason I became a better player was because I came to Philly."

>> The Impossible, Inevitable Redemption of Michael Vick [GQ]
>> NFL says Vick wasn't steered to Philadelphia [PFT]
>> Vick Statement On GQ Article [PE.com]

Union see 4-game winning streak end in shutout loss to Real Salt Lake

Union see 4-game winning streak end in shutout loss to Real Salt Lake

BOX SCORE

SANDY, Utah -- Joao Plata scored his first goal of the season and Real Salt Lake beat the Union, 1-0, on Saturday night to snap Philadelphia's club-record winning streak at four games.

Plata tapped in his goal in the 36th minute after quickly exchanging short passes twice with Jefferson Savarino. Tony Beltran got the play started by saving the ball just before it went over the goal line.

The Union (4-5-5) had a chance to tie it in stoppage time, but goalie Nick Rimando blocked Haris Medunjanin's belt-high free kick and Salt Lake (4-8-2) cleared it after a scramble in front of the net.

Union goalkeeper Andre Blake made seven saves.

Howie Kendrick makes 4th rehab appearance in Lehigh Valley

Howie Kendrick makes 4th rehab appearance in Lehigh Valley

Howie Kendrick on Saturday night made his fourth rehab appearance in Triple A during Lehigh Valley's 13-1 rout of the Louisville Bats in Allentown.

Kendrick went 1 for 5 with a run scored and three strikeouts. He also grounded into a double play and left two runners in scoring position.

It was his second rehab game playing third base. He played third during his appearance in the IronPigs' 8-4 loss Thursday to the Indianapolis Indians. He was 0 for 1 in three plate appearances with a run scored and was hit by a pitch twice (see story).

The Phillies' plan for Kendrick was to have him play a minimum four games at Lehigh Valley. He played left field in two games and third base twice. Pete Mackanin said Wednesday that Kendrick would also get a game at first base but he hasn't gotten a game at first yet.

There is a chance Kendrick could be recalled Sunday before the Phillies’ series finale against the Cincinnati Reds depending on how he feels.

Kendrick has been sidelined since April 15 with an oblique strain. In 10 games before the injury, Kendrick went 13 for 39 (.333) with five extra-base hits and four walks while exclusively playing left field.