What Are You Gonna Do? Pacers Hit Ton of Shots, Get Ton of Calls, Beat Sixers

What Are You Gonna Do? Pacers Hit Ton of Shots, Get Ton of Calls, Beat Sixers

Maybe you think the Sixers lost this game by a lot. Literally speaking I
suppose they did, since the 17-point margin of their 111-94 defeat
meets most conventional definitions of "a lot." But did the Pacers
actually outplay the Sixers considerably? I'm not convinced. They just
made more shots and got more calls. You could blame it on bad defense,
but only a small percentage of the made shots were off defensive
miscues, and a lot of the fouls seemed pretty damn questionable.
Meanwhile, the Sixers shot 53% from the field and 46% from deep,
assisted on 63% of their field goals, and only turned the ball over nine
times. How mad can you really get?

Perhaps more importantly,
the Sixers got good games from their now-proclaimed Backcourt of the
Future, whose progress individually and as teammates is probably as
important if not more so than the team's collective fate this regular
season. Jrue Holiday didn't have great ball-handling numbers, just four
assists with three turnovers, but was dynamite scoring the ball, making
seven of eight for 17 points. Jrue's assist numbers are inevitable going
to go down sharing ball-handling responsibilities with Evan and 'Dre in
the starting lineup, but as long as he's making shots and scoring
efficiently (and defending on the other end), he can remain a key part
of the team's future without posting gaudy passing numbers.

And
Evan Turner kept his streak of Villainy alive with maybe his best-ever
game shooting the ball (like a real two-guard!), hitting nine of
11—including a variety of baseline jumpers, fadeaways, even a
three-pointer!—for 21 points. Turner's rebounding fell off a little in
this one, only grabbing five total, but he added four assists, three
steals and two blocks, without a single turnover in 38 minutes. Even
with the good overall numbers, though, it was the shooting that really
impressed—he's in a groove now like we haven't seen all season, and for
maybe the first time since last year's playoffs, he actually looked like
a legit two-guard out there tonight. (By the way, Evan has now scored
over 20 points in three of the last four games, after doing so only four
times in the first 116 games of his career. Unbelievable with this
guy.)

If you really were gonna fault the Sixers for one thing tonight, it
would be their interior defense. Nice as it was to have Spencer Hawes
back on the court—and he was fine on offense, with six points and three
assists in less than 20 minutes—he didn't exactly help the team with
their rebounding woes, grabbing just two total as he, Nik Vucevic and
Elton Brand were brutalized on the offensive boards in the first half,
and the Pacers frontcourt got way too many layups and free throws. The
Sixers were ultimately out-rebounded 36-27, and only got ten free throws
to Indiana's 22—both problems for the team all season, and ones which
unlike in the last few games, Evan Turner wasn't able to help them out
with.

Still, I'm giving the Sixers a pass on this one. Sometimes you just face
a team that seems to make every shot—the nail-in-coffin back-to-back
threes by George Hill in the fourth were particularly ridiculous—and
playing good D just doesn't seem to be good enough. If the Sixers and
Pacers played a seven-game series—which they very well might in the
not-too-distant future—I'd imagine Philly and Indy would each have one
game this good, and the other five would be decided by single digits.
The teams are almost exactly equal in quality, and tonight's loss
doesn't do much to dissuade that notion for me.

The only reason this loss particularly hurts is because it might be the
first of three straight for the Sixers, as they now go on to face the
Bulls and Heat in succession this weekend. But we'll deal with those
games then, and in the meantime, it's hard to feel too bummed about a
loss where your two most promising young players shoot a combined 16-20.
The Extraterrestrial Invasion continues, and for tonight, that's good
enough.

Union sign second-round pick, defender Aaron Jones

Union sign second-round pick, defender Aaron Jones

The Union have signed their second-round draft choice, Aaron Jones, from last month’s MLS SuperDraft. 

The 5-foot-9 defender was selected 33rd overall and is the second player the Union have signed from the Jan. 13 draft. Marcus Epps was the first to sign. 

Jones has been practicing with the team in their preseason camp and has impressed the front office. 

“We are pleased to sign Aaron to an official MLS contract,” Union sporting director Earnie Stewart said. “Aaron has impressed throughout his time with us in preseason camp, displaying quickness, his ability in passing and on free kicks, and his aggressive one-on-one defending. We look forward to bringing him aboard officially and tracking his development at the right back position over the years to come.”

The 22-year-old originally played at the collegiate level with Georgia State University between 2013-2014. He made 35 starts while scoring three goals with five assists. He transferred to Clemson before the 2015 season and finished his final two seasons with the Tigers. In those two seasons he made 38 starts, scoring four goals, and gathered seven assists. 

Flyers clash with Penguins in cheapest outdoor game this season

ap-heinzfield.jpg
AP Images

Flyers clash with Penguins in cheapest outdoor game this season

Editor's note: The following is sponsored content written by TicketIQ.

Attending this year’s Stadium Series game won’t come at much of a cost for fans at Heinz Field.

With the Penguins set to host the Flyers in the 68,000-plus seat stadium on Saturday, tickets are the cheapest of all three outdoor games this season. On TicketIQ, CSN Philly’s official ticketing partner, Penguins vs. Flyers Stadium Series tickets now average $202.

Saturday’s game is considerably cheaper than the Centennial Classic and Winter Classic, which were held in Toronto and St. Louis last month, respectively. The Winter Classic between the Blues and Blackhawks averaged a $632 ticket while the Maple Leafs and Red Wings’ Centennial Classic posted a $299 average.

As it stands now, this weekend’s game owns the third lowest average for a Stadium Series game in the last four years, trumped only by a 2016 game between the Wild and Blackhawks at TCF Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, which owned an overall average of $160. It is the cheapest two-day-out average that any game has posted, however, inching past a 2015 game between the Sharks and Kings ($203) for that title.

Only a 2014 Stadium Series game at Yankee Stadium between the Rangers and Islanders owned a lower get-in price ($45) two days out than Saturday’s game at Heinz Field. Penguins vs. Flyers tickets currently start from $67 each in the 500 sections.

The Flyers will play in their first Stadium Series game since the format was created in 2014. It will be their third overall outdoor game after 2010’s Winter Classic at Fenway Park and 2012’s Winter Classic at Citizens Bank Park.

The game comes at a crucial time for the Flyers, who remain on the cusp of a playoff spot in a crowded Eastern Conference. As of Thursday afternoon, they sit just three points removed from the second wild-card spot. Some pushing and shoving will occur over the next two months, however, as several other teams fight for that last playoff berth.

The Penguins play host to their second outdoor game at Heinz Field following 2011’s Winter Classic against the Capitals. It will be the reigning Stanley Cup champions’ fourth outdoor game since 2008. They enter Saturday owners of the second seed in the Metropolitan division behind the league-best Capitals with 82 points in tow.