Why Philadelphia lost WrestleManias 31 and 32

Why Philadelphia lost WrestleManias 31 and 32

There was talk over the summer that Philadelphia was in the running for a future WrestleMania, but that plan appears to have fallen by the wayside for now. World Wrestling Entertainment announced on Tuesday that Santa Clara, California won its bid to host next year’s show at Levi’s Stadium, the new home of the San Francisco 49ers.

To make matters worse, an NBC Bay Area affiliate reported Cowboys Stadium is “confirmed” for WrestleMania in 2016. If true, that means the very earliest Philly could land the WWE’s hallmark event is three years from now.

’15 and ’16 were described as the target dates for a WM at Lincoln Financial Field when the story broke back in July. Both Santa Clara and Arlington were said to be competition at the time, but the dirt sheets went cold on Philly sometime between then and the announcement. So what happened?

Apparently, city officials didn’t do a good enough job of WOOOO-ing the WWE. (Pretty clever, eh?) Here’s the report by PWInsider via WrestleZone:

WWE chose Santa Clara, California to host WrestleMania 31 over Philadelphia due to Philly official's approach to the bidding process, reports PWInsider. It's being said that Philadelphia lost out on WrestleMania because they showed a "lack of interest". Bay Area officials were much more inviting and enthusiastic about hosting the big event.

The Philadelphia representatives acted more like they were doing WWE a favor by hosting 'Mania in their city, rather than the other way around. The PWInsider report is claiming that was a major factor in WWE's decision to ultimately go with Santa Clara to host WrestleMania 31.

This is also likely the reason Philadelphia's Lincoln Financial Field missed out on WrestleMania 32 as well. It was confirmed this past week that the AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas — home of the Dallas Cowboys — would host WrestleMania in 2016.

Assuming there’s any validity to that, it’s a curious decision by the city. Fans literally travel from all over the world to see WrestleMania, which has turned into a week-long event that includes all kinds of special access to the performers leading up to the night of the show, and as has become customary, the next night’s edition of Raw.

That’s tens of thousands of tourists that probably won’t be visiting the City of Brotherly Love anytime in the next three years—or more importantly, their wallets.

Philadelphia has a rich pro wrestling history, so there’s little doubt WrestleMania will eventually make its way back to the city. Maybe, just guessing, for WrestleMania 35, which would mark the 20-year anniversary of the last time the event was here inside the Wells Fargo Center.

Oh well. Hopefully that’s going to be the last thing Philly loses to Dallas for the rest of the month.

Drexel falls to James Madison in potential CAA Tournament preview

Drexel falls to James Madison in potential CAA Tournament preview

BOX SCORE

Jackson Kent and Tom Vodanovich combined to score 31 points and James Madison held off Drexel late to secure a 70-64 victory Thursday night.

The game could be a preview of a first-round match-up in the Colonial Athletic Association Tournament. With one game left in the regular season, James Madison (9-21, 7-10) is the No. 7 seed and Drexel (9-21, 3-14) has locked up the No. 10 seed. Those seeds meet in the first round, with the winner facing the No. 2 seed in the second round.

Sammy Mojica hit a 3-pointer with :32 left to get the Dragons within four, 66-62, but Shakir Brown and Joey McLean each hit a pair of free throws to seal the victory.

Kent hit 6 of 11 from the floor and tallied 16 points with eight rebounds to lead the Dukes. Vodanovich added 15 points.

Kurk Lee and Mojica both scored 18 points off the Dragons' bench.

Conspiracy charge added for 3 former Penn State administrators

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AP Images

Conspiracy charge added for 3 former Penn State administrators

HARRISBURG, Pa. -- A Pennsylvania judge on Thursday allowed prosecutors to add a conspiracy charge against three former Penn State administrators, increasing their possible penalty if convicted of crimes for their handling of the Jerry Sandusky child molestation scandal.

Judge John Boccabella granted a request by the attorney general's office to tack on a related conspiracy count to the charges of endangering the welfare of children.

Prosecutors said each felony count carries up to 7 years in prison and a $15,000 fine.

Jury selection is scheduled for March 20 in Harrisburg in the case of former university president Graham Spanier, former vice president Gary Schultz and former athletic director Tim Curley.

The defendants sought permission last week from Boccabella for an appeal that could delay the trial. The judge has not ruled on that request.

They argue Boccabella erred when he declined to dismiss the child-welfare charges, arguing the statute of limitations expired, the defendants did not provide direct care for children and they are charged with actions that occurred before the law was revised.

Earlier this month, the judge dismissed charges of failing to properly report suspected abuse, and last year the Superior Court threw out perjury, obstruction and conspiracy charges.

The three administrators fielded a complaint in 2001 from a graduate assistant who said he saw Sandusky, then retired as an assistant football coach, sexually abusing a boy in a team shower.

They did not report the matter to police or child welfare authorities, but did tell Sandusky he could no longer bring children to the campus and they notified his charity for children, The Second Mile.

Sandusky currently is serving a lengthy state prison term after being convicted in 2012 of 45 counts of sexual abuse of 10 boys.

Last week, a new judge appointed to preside over his appeals under the state's Post-Conviction Relief Act scheduled a March 24 hearing at the courthouse near State College to "present and finalize the evidentiary portion" of the hearing.