Worley Rocked in Tough Day for Phillies Subs

Worley Rocked in Tough Day for Phillies Subs

After being called up, sent down, re-called, asked to pitch relief, sent down again and ultimately recalled once more, Vance Worley's struggles on Sunday afternoon weren't altogether shocking considering his recently unorthodox travel and pitching schedules. Though Vance had performed plenty well in his previous appearances for the big club this season, the New York Mets saw to it that Worley encountered his first rough up of 2011 in the form of a 9-5 series-ending loss.

Before receiving the hook, Worley surrendered eight runs on twelve hits and needed seventy-one pitches to complete just three innings of work. Now, in fairness to Vance, only five of those eight allowed were of the earned of the variety, with the remaining three credited to a Jimmy Rollins fielding error in the first. That said, regardless of exactly how the runs came, the Phillies founds themselves in an eight-run hole after only the second inning.

In relief, the combination of Kyle Kendrick, J.C. Romero and Danys Baez would give up only one more run in the final six innings of play. While the pen was solid in terms of limiting any extra damage, Baez was especially lucky to work out of a messy bases-loaded jam in the eighth thanks to a timely (and somewhat lucky) double-play.

On the mound for the Mets, although neither Niese nor Bucholz nor Beato were particularly dominant in allowing five runs of a totals of eleven hits, they were all good enough to lock down an eight-run head start.

Actually, the five crossed and eleven knocks are pretty impressive considering the lineup Charlie marched out in Flushing Meadows on Sunday afternoon. With Chase Utley, Carlos Ruiz and Ryan Howard all getting the day off, Phils fans watched as Michael Martinez, Wilson Valdez and Dane Sardinha did their best to fill some bigs shoes. Deserved or not—and you're certainly free to weigh in with thoughts of your own below—the manager will no doubt be on the receiving end of at least some criticism for deciding to sit all three on the same day.

Leaving NY for DC, the team will be hopping the train this evening in preparation for tomorrow's Memorial Day match up with the Washington Nationals. As stated on the broadcast, Phillies' color commentator Chris Wheeler is really looking forward to the trip, and especially enjoys traveling by rail. "The scenery is really beautiful and it's just so easy to fall asleep once that train starts gently rocking back and forth."

There's truly nothing like a Chris Wheeler anecdote to make a bad afternoon of baseball even worse. Let's say we all forget this and get back to some barbecue. Enjoy the weekend, guys.

Watch Delware 87ers legend Nate Robinson dribble through a player's legs

Watch Delware 87ers legend Nate Robinson dribble through a player's legs

Delaware 87ers living legend Nate Robinson pulled a new one out of his bag of tricks on Saturday.

Akin to your dog running through the doggie door and back into your house, the 5-foot-9 Robinson took matters into his own hands when he was in a jam and dribbled *THROUGH* the legs of 7-foot-2 Raptors 905 big man Edy Tavares.

Like put his entire body through Tavares' legs while dribbling.

No, seriously, check this out.

Call him up to the Sixers right now just for that. All of us, especially Shaq, need to see him do that to JaVale McGee on Monday when the Warriors are in town.

Outside of that move, it was not a good night for Robinson as he finished with just three points on 1 of 6 from the field.

The Robinson comeback tour in the First State has gotten off to an OK start. He's averaging eight points through four games with the 87ers.

But who cares about points if you can do cool stuff like dribble your whole body through another dude's legs?

Commence the Justin Anderson era

Commence the Justin Anderson era

Last night, the Philadelphia 76ers came seconds away from not just their second straight win since their already shorthanded team was further decimated over the All-Star break, but their second straight pantsing of New York after what should've been an easy Knicks win. Down double-digits for most of the second half -- and trailing by 12 with just five minutes to go -- the Ballers battled back to take a one-point lead on a Jahlil Okafor hook shot with nine seconds to go. But Carmelo Anthony was unstoppable virtually all night, and he victimized Robert Covington at the buzzer with a baseline jumper that avenged the T.J. McConnell shot a couple months earlier. Final score: Knicks 110, 76ers 109. 

Hard to get mad at this L when you're just overwhelmed with love for everyone on the roster. Dario Saric continued his awesome February with 19-15-5 -- the first Sixers rookie to put up those numbers in a half-century -- even though his shot wasn't really falling (7-17 FG, 1-5 3PT). That's what's really remarkable about Dario's recent hot streak, and what separates it from, say, Nik Stasukas' impossibly scorching late 2016 -- he's averaging 20 a game (along with nine rebounds and three assists) over his last seven, and he's shooting over 50% for that span, but he's doing it while only hitting 31% from deep. The fact that he's scoring so prolifically without getting a lot of lucky bounces means it's not just an unsustainable fluke, and that Dario's gonna be a problem for defenses in this league for a long time. 

Speaking of Nik -- he had some embarrassing moments in this one, including a thunderously missed dunk and a thrown-away pass while leading a 3-on-1 break, but he redeemed himself with some big shots in the fourth quarter, and ended up with a nice 14 points on 5-9 shooting. It's his seventh game in a row scoring double digits -- all since moving back to the bench, which is particularly remarkable when you consider that in his 21 games before that as a starter, he only scored in double-digits five times. His starting/reserve splits for the season remain absolutely absurd, but if his NBA destiny is just to be an awesome seventh man for us, we'll certainly take it. 

And as much crap as Jahlil Okafor has gotten from Sixers fans the last few weeks -- few more than me -- as the unlucky child left behind in the Sixers' divorce with Nerlens Noel, I gotta say: He was awesome in this one. 28 points and ten rebounds, and even though the Knicks paraded to the rim early (Okafor-Saric frontcourt, yikes), Jahlil got stronger as the game went on both sides of the ball, in a way I don't ever remember seeing from him before. He saved a good deal of his damage for the fourth quarter, with 11 points, including two absolutely gigantic buckets late, including the hook on the Sixers' scattered final possession that could've been the game-winner. The Nerlens trade will never be justifiable, but if Jah can keep playing like this, it'll certainly take some of the sting out.

So much more to rave about in this one: T.J. McConnell was as clutch late as Jah, even hitting a rare three-pointer (just his second of 2017) to nearly become a repeat Knicks-killer. Covington couldn't handle Carmelo (37 points on 15-25 shooting) at really any point in this one -- thus putting him in good company with every other Sixers wing defender of the past decade -- and his own shot wasn't falling, but he still powered his way to 20 and 10, and had three steals, making it six straight games with at least that many, the longest such streak in the NBA this season. Sergio Rodriguez had about the worst game a point guard could have (2 points on 1-8 shooting, with just one assist and terrible defense), but he's just about the only Sixer you didn't want to hug after this one. 

And oh yeah, welcome aboard Justin Anderson. Our latest acquisition didn't get to do a ton for us in this one, playing just three minutes and attempting one shot (a badly missed corner three), but he had some eye-catching moments on defense, and gave us all some nice Jason Richardson flashbacks wearing the #23. Looking forward to getting to know you, J-And.