Your Obligatory Picture of Casper Wells on the Mound in the Longest Game in Phillies History

Your Obligatory Picture of Casper Wells on the Mound in the Longest Game in Phillies History

This, upon review, is quite clearly a picture of John McDonald in relief of Casper Wells. Welcome to 4 a.m. Blame the AP.

Appropriately enough, the ghost of Wilson Valdez was named Casper.

Casper Wells pitched 2/3 of the 18th inning in what was the longest game -- by time -- in Phillies history, a 12-7, 18-inning loss to the Diamondbacks.

Your relevant numbers from CBS Sports:

The teams combined to use 20 pitchers in a contest that ended at 2:12 a.m. and took 7 hours, 6 minutes -- setting a mark for length of game for both teams. It was the longest game by time since the Dodgers and Astros played eight minutes longer on June 3, 1989.

The 18 innings also matched the longest game in Diamondbacks history in terms of innings, though the Phillies fell short of the 21-inning club record set in 1918. The teams combined for 137 at-bats, 35 hits, 32 strikeouts and 28 walks. Both teams used 22 of their available 25 players, with only three starting pitchers for each going unused.

Not mentioned above is the 712 combined pitches thrown, nor the 52 pitches D'Backs leadoff man Tony Campana saw by himself, en route to a 1-for-5 outing with five walks.

Further worth mention is the fact that starting pitched Ethan Martin went 2/3 of an inning Saturday night before an outfielder, Wells, went 2/3 of an inning Sunday morning -- in the same game.

Ryne Sandberg's first words after the game announced that Roy Halladay will start Sunday's series finale after the Phillies burned Sunday's original starter, Tyler Cloyd, when he tossed five shutout innings in extras. Halladay, who was scheduled to start for Double A Reading, will now appear in his first major-league game since May 5. Sandberg admitted after the game that he really didn't know who was available in the pen tomorrow, except that they'll probably be adding a long man before the game.

The Phillies have exactly 11 hours and 23 minutes between the end of Saturday's game and Doc's first pitch.

On Halladay:

On Wells:

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Best of NHL: Trocheck's last-second goal lifts Panthers past Blues

Best of NHL: Trocheck's last-second goal lifts Panthers past Blues

ST. LOUIS -- Vincent Trocheck scored with just under 5 seconds remaining to lift the Florida Panthers to a 2-1 victory over the St. Louis Blues on Monday night.

Jonathan Marchessault also scored and James Reimer stopped 26 shots to help the Panthers complete a 5-0 road trip -- their first perfect trip of at least that many games in franchise history.

Reimer has won five straight decisions and has not lost in regulation since Jan. 7 against Boston, going 6-0-1 since.

The Panthers moved into a tie with Boston for third place in the Atlantic Division, but have the edge because they have a game in hand on the Bruins.

Kyle Brodziak, playing for the second time after missing 10 games due to a broken foot, scored for the Blues and Jake Allen finished with 31 saves. St. Louis lost its second straight since winning six in a row (see full recap).

Coyotes use three-goal 1st period to beat Ducks
GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Radim Vrbata capped Arizona's three-goal first period and the Coyotes held on for 3-2 victory over the Anaheim Ducks on Monday night.

Christian Dvorak and Jakob Chychrun also scored for Arizona, and starting goalie Mike Smith had 27 saves before leaving about 4 1/2 minutes into the third period after a collision in the net. Marek Langhamer helped kill a power play after being pressed into action for his NHL debut and stopped six of the seven shots he faced.

The Coyotes have won four of their last six.

Langhamer gave up Ryan Getzlaf's second goal of the night with 26.8 seconds to play, but thwarted two quality shots in the final seconds.

Jonathan Bernier gave up three goals on six shots in the first period for the Ducks. John Gibson came on to start the second and stopped all 14 shots he faced (see full recap).

Joel Embiid admits to aggravating foot injury after 2014 surgery, almost quitting

Joel Embiid admits to aggravating foot injury after 2014 surgery, almost quitting

Joel Embiid trusts the Process, more so than anyone — the process of patience.

After sitting out two whole seasons because of foot injuries, Embiid learned the importance of patience the hard way.

Appearing on NBA TV's Open Court, Joel Embiid opened up about how he reaggravated the fracture in his foot that cost him the 2015-16 season.

"I didn't know how to deal with patience," Embiid said on the roundtable discussion. "I just wanted to do stuff, that's why I think I needed a second surgery, because after my first one, I just wanted to play basketball again. I just wanted to be on the court and I pushed through what I wasn't supposed to.

"At one point I thought about quitting. I just wanted to come back home and just forget everything."

Embiid goes on to discuss the Sixers' turnaround this season and his mindset during his recovery. Watch the full clip below. 

Embiid also said he models his game after Hakeem Olajuwon.